Skip to Content

Great Empires, Small Nations

The Uncertain Future of the Sovereign State

By Josep M. Colomer

Routledge – 2007 – 128 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $50.95
    978-0-415-43775-2
    August 24th 2007
  • Add to CartHardback: $185.00
    978-0-415-43774-5
    August 29th 2007

Description

'Colomer's book is a stimulating read, certainly for anyone willing to entertain nonconventional observations that hold up well in what is happening in the world. His most important argument is that global public services, such as security, a trading system, an international monetary regime, and communication networks provided by large democratic entities such as the United States and the European Union provide opportunities for small countries and regions to prosper. The successful smaller units – like Ireland or Catalonia – trade more in proportion to their economies than large ones, are generally more democratic, and have more multilingual populations. I expect this book to be widely read and greatly admired.’ Sidney Weintraub, William E. Simon Chair in Political Economy, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Washington DC, USA

Reviews

'Colomer's book is a stimulating read, certainly for anyone willing to entertain nonconventional observations that hold up well on what is happening in the world. His most important argument is that global public services, such as security, a trading system, an international monetary regime, and communication networks provided by large democratic entities such as the United States and the European Union provide opportunities for small countries and regions to prosper. The successful smaller units --like Ireland or Catalonia-- trade more in proportion to their economies than large ones, are generally more democratic, and have more multilingual populations. I expect this book to be widely read and greatly admired.' - Sidney Weintraub, William E. Simon Chair in Political Economy, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington DC, USA.

'Great Empires, Small Nations is an original and persuasive book. Colomer looks beyond nation-states and discovers the world that does not resemble the Westphalian paradigm. The book makes an important contribution to our understanding of international politics, especially in Europe.' - Jan Zielonka, Professor of European Politics and Ralf Dahrendorf Fellow, University of Oxford, UK.

'This book strengthens intellectually what practice shows: that the small nations not only are viable as identities, societies and economies, but can attain excellent performance. This is on provision that they do not confine themselves, but rather participate in great political and economic spaces. Besides its intellectual quality, this book has another great merit: it opens gates to hope, something we need in Catalonia now. And it does it with solid and consistent arguments, that is, with rationality, some of which it is also convenient for us to have.' - Jordi Pujol, President of Catalonia (1980-2003) and President of the Assembly of European Regions (1992-96)

Contents

Introduction: The Imperial Opportunity for Small Nations Part 1: Empires, States and Nations 1. Great Empires 2. Sovereign States 3. Small Nations 4. Nation Building and Deconstructing Part 2: Broad Alliances, Small Governments 5. Military Alliances 6. Market Agreements 7. Linguas Francas 8. Small Democracies Part 3: The European Empire 9. Unity in Diversity 10. Self-Government a la Carte 11. A Case of a Failing Nation-State 12. Multilevel Democracy Conclusion: After Sovereignties

Author Bio

Josep M. Colomer is a member by election of the Academia Europaea and life member of the American Political Science Association. He is currently a Research Professor at the CSIC and the Pompeu Fabra University (in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe).

Name: Great Empires, Small Nations: The Uncertain Future of the Sovereign State (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Josep M. Colomer. 'Colomer's book is a stimulating read, certainly for anyone willing to entertain nonconventional observations that hold up well in what is happening in the world. His most important argument is that global public services, such as...
Categories: History: Theory, Method & Historiography, Political History, History, Politics & International Relations, Introductory Politics