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Religion, Terror and Violence

Religious Studies Perspectives

Edited by Bryan Rennie, Philip L. Tite

Routledge – 2008 – 316 pages

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  • Add to CartPaperback: $42.95
    978-0-415-44231-2
    March 30th 2008
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    978-0-415-44230-5
    April 6th 2008

Description

September 11 and the subsequent War on Terror continues to cast a long shadow over the world. Religion, Terror and Violence brings together a group of distinguished scholars from a range of backgrounds and disciplines to explore the claim that acts of violence – most spectacularly the attack of September 11, 2001 and the international reaction to it – were intimately linked to cultural and social authorizing processes that could be called 'religious.'

This book provides a nuanced but incisive insight into the reaction of the discipline of religious studies to the post 9/11 world.

Contents

Introduction Sacred Violence and the Scholar of Religion as Public Intellectual Philip L. Tite Explanatory Approaches to Violence and Religion Violence Internal and External Robert Segal Rhetorical Reflections Savage Civil Religion Paul Christopher Johnson The Rhetoric of Evil and Eradicating Terrorism Caryn D. Riswold The Tricks and Treats of Classification: Searching for the Heart of Authentic Islam Russell T. McCutcheon Discussion: Rhetorical Reflections Anna S. King Theological Reflections A New Paradigm of International Relations? Reflections After September 11, 2001 Hans Küng Can Love Save the World? Walter Wink Discussion: Theological Reflections Samuel M. Powell Historical and Social Reflections Religious Terror and Global War Mark Juergensmeyer Jihad and Islamic History Jonathan E. Brockopp The Roots of Public Attitudes Toward State Accommodation of European Muslims’ Religious Practices Before and After September 11 Joel S. Fetzer and J. Christopher Soper Terrorism From a Buddhist Perspective Martin Adam and Wayne Codling Discussion: Historical and Social Reflections Michel Desjardins Pedagogical and Professional Reflections Teaching Islam Through and After September 11th: Towards a Progressive Muslim Agenda Omid Safi. Islam Within the Context of Higher Education Zayn Kassam Thoughts on Being a Muslim Scholar of Islam in America Post-9/11 Amir Hussain Discussion: Pedagogical and Professional Reflections Susan E.Henking Aesthetic Reflections Seeing What is Missing: Art, Artists, and September 11 Maureen Korp Concluding Reflections Religion, Violence, and the Pursuit of Truth Bryan Rennie

Author Bio

Bryan Rennie is Vira I. Heinz Professor of Religion, and Chair of the Department of Religion, History, Philosophy, and Classics Westminster College. His publications include Reconstructing Eliade: Making Sense of Religion (1996), (editor) Changing Religious Worlds: The Meaning and End of Mircea Eliade (2001), (editor) Mircea Eliade: A Critical Reader (Equinox Press, 2006), and (editor) The International Eliade (SUNY Press, 2007).

Philip L. Tite is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Early Christian Literature and History, Department of Religious Studies, Willamette University. His previous publications include Compositional Transitions in 1 Peter: An Analysis of the Letter-Opening (1997) and Conceiving Peace and Violence: A New Testament Legacy (2004).

Name: Religion, Terror and Violence: Religious Studies Perspectives (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Bryan Rennie, Philip L. Tite. September 11 and the subsequent War on Terror continues to cast a long shadow over the world. Religion, Terror and Violence brings together a group of distinguished scholars from a range of backgrounds and disciplines to explore the claim that acts of...
Categories: Political Islam, Religion & Politics