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Alfred Hitchcock

Edited by Neil Badmington

Routledge – 2014 – 1,512 pages

Series: Critical Evaluations of Leading Film-makers

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    978-0-415-64525-6
    February 23rd 2014

Description

‘Will there ever be an end to the supply of books about Alfred Hitchcock?’, pleaded the Times Literary Supplement in 2008. It is a fair question for, as Michael Walker pointed out in Hitchcock’s Motifs, more has been written about Hitchcock (1899–1980) than any other film director. Indeed, Jane E. Sloan’s 1993 Hitchcock bibliography revealed that well over seventy-five scholarly books and nearly 1,000 articles had been published by 1990; and those figures have, of course, continued inexorably to rise.

So, while the prospective viewer of Vertigo or Rear Window is likely to feel a compelling need for some preparation before consuming the film itself, the daunting quantity (and variable quality) of Hitchcock criticism makes it difficult to discriminate the useful from the tendentious, superficial, and otiose. That is why this new Routledge title, compiled by Neil Badmington, is so urgently needed. In four volumes, the collection meets the need for an authoritative reference work to allow researchers and students to make sense of the vast Hitchcock literature and the continuing explosion in research output. Users will now be able easily and rapidly to locate the best and most influential critical scholarship, work that is otherwise often inaccessible or scattered throughout a variety of specialist journals and books. With material gathered into one easy-to-use set, researchers and students can now spend more of their time with the key journal articles, book chapters, and other pieces, rather than on time-consuming (and sometimes fruitless) archival searches.

The collection is supplemented with a comprehensive introduction newly written by the editor, which places the collected material in its historical and intellectual context. It is also fully indexed and includes an expertly compiled ‘Thematic Guide’ to enable users readily to discover and follow thematic pathways through the assembled works. Alfred Hitchcock is an essential reference work and is destined to be valued as a vital research resource.

Contents

1. Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol, ‘The English Period’, Hitchcock: The First Forty-Four Films, trans. Stanley Hochman (New York: Ungar, 1979), pp. 3–56.

2. Jean Douchet, ‘Hitch and his Audience’, trans. David Wilson, in Robert Kolker (ed.), Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho: A Casebook (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 62–73.

3. Robin Wood, ‘Introduction’ [1965], in Hitchcock’s Films Revisited, rev. ed. (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002), pp. 55–85.

4. Raymond Durgnat, ‘Moral Codes: Mainstreams and Challenges’, The Strange Case of Alfred Hitchcock; or the Plain Man’s Hitchcock (London: Faber and Faber, 1974), pp. 27–61.

5. Laura Mulvey, ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’, Screen, 1975, 16, 3, 6–18.

6. William Rothman, ‘Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious’, Georgia Review, 1975, 39, 4, 884–927.

7. Maurice Yacowar, ‘Hitchcock’s Imagery and Art’ [1977], Hitchcock’s British Films (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2010), pp. 204–16.

8. Maurice Yacowar, ‘Hitchcock’s Appearances’ [1977], Hitchcock’s British Films (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2010), pp. 217–25.

9. Raymond Bellour, ‘Psychosis, Neurosis, Perversion (on Psycho)’, trans. Nancy Huston, The Analysis of Film (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2000), pp. 238–61.

10. William Rothman, ‘Alfred Hitchcock’s Murder!: Theatre, Authorship, and the Presence of the Camera’, Wide Angle, 1980, 4, 1, 54–61.

11. Stanley Cavell, ‘North by Northwest’, Critical Inquiry, 1981, 7, 4, 761–76.

12. Thomas Elsaesser, ‘The Dandy in Hitchcock’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzalès (eds.), Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays (London: BFI, 1999), pp. 3–13.

13. Michel Chion, ‘The Impossible Embodiment’, in Slavoj Žižek (ed.), Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan (But Were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock) (London and New York: Verso, 1992), pp. 195–207.

14. Gilles Deleuze, Cinema 1: The Movement-Image, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam (London and New York: Continuum, 2005), pp. 204–9.

15. Robert Stam and Roberta Pearson, ‘Hitchcock’s Rear Window: Reflexivity and the Critique of Voyeurism’.

16. George Toles, ‘"If Thine Eye Offend Thee …": Psycho and the Art of Infection’, New Literary History, 1984, 15, 3, 631–51.

17. Tom Ryall, ‘Hitchcock and Genre: "The Classic Thriller Sextet"’, Alfred Hitchcock and the British Cinema (London: Athlone, 1996), pp. 115–40.

18. Tania Modleski, ‘Rape Versus Mans/laughter: Hitchcock’s Blackmail and Feminist Interpretation’, PMLA, 1987, 102, 3, 304–15.

19. John Belton, ‘The Space of Rear Window’, in Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick (eds.), Hitchcock’s Rereleased Films: From Rope to Vertigo (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1991), pp. 76–94.

20. Lesley Brill, ‘Young and Innocent: Comic Romances of False Accusation’, The Hitchcock Romance: Love and Irony in Hitchcock’s Films (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988), pp. 22–69.

21. Thomas Schatz, ‘Selznick and Hitchcock: Balance of Power’, The Genius of the System: Hollywood Filmmaking in the Studio Era (London: Faber and Faber, 1998), pp. 271–94.

22. Robin Wood, ‘The Murderous Gays: Hitchcock’s Homophobia’, Hitchcock’s Films Revisited (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002), pp. 336–57.

23. Ina Rae Hark, ‘Keeping Your Amateur Standing: Audience Participation and Good Citizenship in Hitchcock’s Political Films’, Cinema Journal, 1990, 29, 2, 8–22.

24. D. A. Miller, ‘Anal Rope’, Representations, 1990, 32, 114–33.

25. Stephen Rebello, ‘Shooting: Production #9401, Hitchcock’s "Thirty-Day Picture"’, Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho (London and New York: Marion Boyars, 1998), pp. 79–128.

26. Robert J. Corber, ‘Reconstructing Homosexuality: Hitchcock and the Homoerotics of Spectatorial Pleasure’, In the Name of National Security: Hitchcock, Homophobia, and the Political Construction of Gender in Postwar America (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993), pp. 56–82.

27. Anthony J. Mazzella, ‘Author, Auteur: Reading Rear Window from Woolrich to Hitchcock’, in Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick (eds.), Hitchcock’s Rereleased Films: From Rope to Vertigo (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1991), pp. 62–75.

28. Sabrina Barton, ‘"Crisscross": Paranoia and Projection in Strangers on a Train’, Camera Obscura, 1991, 25–6, 74–100.

29. Slavoj Žižek, ‘The Hitchcockian Blot’, Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan Through Popular Culture (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991), pp. 88–106.

30. Miran Bozovic, ‘The Man Behind His Own Retina’, in Slavoj Žižek (ed.), Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan (But Were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock) (London and New York: Verso, 1992), pp. 161–77.

31. Mladen Dolar, ‘Hitchcock’s Objects’, in Slavoj Žižek (ed.), Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan (But Were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock) (London and New York: Verso, 1992), pp. 31–46.

32. Robert E. Kapsis, ‘The Making of a Thriller Director’, Hitchcock: The Making of a Reputation (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1992), pp. 16–68.

33. Tom Cohen, ‘Hitchcock and the Death of (Mr.) Memory’, Qui Parle, 1993, 6, 2, 41–75.

34. Greg Garrett, ‘The Men Who Knew Too Much: The Unmade Films of Hitchcock and Lehman’, North Dakota Quarterly, 1993, 61, 2, 47–58.

35. Thomas Hemmeter, ‘Hitchcock the Feminist: Rereading Shadow of a Doubt’, Framing Hitchcock: Selected Essays from the Hitchcock Annual (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002), pp. 221–33.

36. Paula Marantz Cohen, ‘Novel into Film: Sabotage’, Alfred Hitchcock: The Legacy of Victorianism (Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky Press, 1995), pp. 29–49.

37. Lee Edelman, ‘Piss Elegant: Freud, Hitchcock, and the Micturating Penis’, GLQ, 1995, 2, 1–2, 149–77.

38. Dennis R. Perry, ‘Imps of the Perverse: Discovering the Hitchcock/Poe Connection’, Literature/Film Quarterly, 1996, 24, 4, 393–9.

39. Stefan Sharff, ‘The Art of Seeing, The Art of Looking’, The Art of Looking in Hitchcock’s Rear Window (New York: Limelight, 1997), pp. 2–10.

40. Thomas M. Leitch, ‘The Hitchcock Moment’, in Sidney Gottlieb and Christopher Brookhouse (eds.), Framing Hitchcock: Selected Essays from the Hitchcock Annual (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002), pp. 180–96.

41. Charles Barr, English Hitchcock (Moffat: Cameron and Hollis, 1999), pp. 6–21.

42. Lee Edelman, ‘Hitchcock’s Future’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzalès (eds.), Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays (London: BFI, 1999), pp. 239–58.

43. Brigitte Peucker, ‘The Cut of Representation: Painting and Sculpture in Hitchcock’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzalès (eds.), Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays (London: BFI, 1999), pp. 141–56.

44. Elsie B. Michie, ‘Unveiling Maternal Desires: Hitchcock and American Domesticity’, in Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington (eds.), Hitchcock’s America (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 29–53.

45. Richard Millington, ‘Hitchcock and American Character: The Comedy of Self-construction in North by Northwest’, in Jonathan Freedman and Richard Millington (eds.), Hitchcock’s America (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 135–54.

46. James Morrison, ‘Hitchcock’s Ireland: The Performance of Irish Identity in Juno and the Paycock and Under Capricorn’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzáles (eds.), Hitchcock: Past and Future (London and New York: Routledge, 2004), pp. 193–210.

47. Peter Wollen, ‘Rope: Three Hypotheses’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzalès (eds.), Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays (London: BFI, 1999), pp. 75–85.

48. Joan Hawkins, ‘"See it from the Beginning": Hitchcock’s Reconstruction of Film History’, in Sidney Gottlieb and Christopher Brookhouse (eds.), Framing Hitchcock: Selected Essays from the Hitchcock Annual (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002), pp. 373–86.

49. David Sterritt, ‘Alfred Hitchcock: Registrar of Births and Deaths’, in Sidney Gottlieb and Christopher Brookhouse (eds.), Framing Hitchcock: Selected Essays from the Hitchcock Annual (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002), pp. 310–22.

50. Sidney Gottlieb, ‘Early Hitchcock: The German Influence’, in Sidney Gottlieb and Christopher Brookhouse (eds.), Framing Hitchcock: Selected Essays from the Hitchcock Annual (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002), pp. 35–58.

51. Peter Conrad, ‘The Pursuit of Unhappiness’, The Hitchcock Murders (London: Faber and Faber, 2000), pp. 121–36.

52. M. J. Robinson, ‘The Poetics of Camp in the Films of Alfred Hitchcock’, Rocky Mountain Review, 2000, 54, 1, 53–65.

53. John Fawell, ‘Rear Window’s Unity: Freedom Through Constraint’, Hitchcock’s Rear Window: The Well-Made Film (Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 2001), pp. 16–40.

54. Robert J. Yanal, ‘The End of Suspicion: Hitchcock, Descartes, and Joan Fontaine’, in Kevin L. Stoehr (ed.), Film and Knowledge: Essays on the Integration of Images and Ideas (Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Co., 2002), pp. 50–66.

55. James Naremore, ‘Hitchcock and Humor’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzáles (eds.), Hitchcock: Past and Present (London and New York: Routledge, 2004), pp. 22–36.

56. Raymond Durgnat, A Long Hard Look at Psycho (London: BFI, 2002), pp. 127–42.

57. William Rothman, ‘The Villain in Hitchcock: "Does He Look Like a ‘Wrong One’ to You?"’, in The ‘I’ of the Camera: Essays in Film Criticism, History, and Aesthetics, 2nd edn. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 254–62.

58. Sidney Gottlieb, ‘Unknown Hitchcock: The Unrealized Projects’, in Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzáles (eds.), Hitchcock: Past and Future (London and New York: Routledge, 2004), pp. 85–106.

59. Murray Pomerance, ‘A Bromide for Ballantine: Spellbound, Psychoanalysis, Light’, An Eye for Hitchcock (New Brunswick and London: Rutgers University Press, 2004), pp. 58–91.

60. Tom Cohen, ‘Zarathustran Hitchcock’, Hitchcock’s Cryptonymies: Volume I: Secret Agents (Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2005), pp. 184–92.

61. Nicholas Haeffner, ‘Delirium of Interpretation? The Uses and Abuses of Psychoanalysis’, Alfred Hitchcock (Harlow: Pearson Longman, 2005), pp. 81–92.

62. John Orr, ‘Hitch as Matrix-Figure: Hitchcock and Twentieth-Century Cinema’, Hitchcock and Twentieth-Century Cinema (London: Wallflower, 2005), pp. 1–25.

63. Eleanor Salotto, ‘She’s Not There: Vertigo and the Ghostly Feminine’, Gothic Returns in Collins, Dickens, Zola, and Hitchcock (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006), pp. 101–17.

64. Jack Sullivan, ‘Waltzes from Vienna: Hitchcock’s Forgotten Operetta’, Hitchcock’s Music (New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2006), pp. 20–30.

65. Constantine Verevis, ‘For Ever Hitchcock: Psycho and its Remakes’, in David Boyd and R. Barton Palmer (eds.), After Hitchcock: Influence, Imitation, and Intertextuality (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2006), pp. 15–29.

66. Richard Allen, ‘Romantic Irony’, Hitchcock’s Romantic Irony (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), pp. 3–37.

67. Maria di Battista, ‘Daphne du Maurier and Alfred Hitchcock’, in Helen Taylor (ed.), The Daphne du Maurier Companion (London: Virago, 2007), pp. 320–9.

68. Tom Gunning, ‘Hitchcock and the Picture in the Frame’, New England Review, 2007, 28, 3, 14–31.

69. Helen Hanson, Hollywood Heroines: Women in Film Noir and the Female Gothic Film (London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2007), pp. 98–112.

70. Barbara Straumann, ‘Inhabiting Feminine Suspicion’, Figurations of Exile in Hitchcock and Nabokov (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2008), pp. 127–64.

71. Philip J. Skerry, ‘The Evolution of the Shower Scene’, Psycho in the Shower: The History of Cinema’s Most Famous Scene (London and New York: Continuum, 2009), pp. 188–208.

72. Ned Schantz, ‘Hospitality and the Unsettled Viewer: Hitchcock’s Shadow Scenes’, Camera Obscura, 2010, 25, 1, 1–27.

73. Neil Badmington, ‘SpectRebecca’, Hitchcock’s Magic (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011), pp. 67–84.

74. Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli, ‘Vertigo and the Vertiginous History of Film Theory’, Camera Obscura, 2011, 25, 3, 101–39.

75. Brenda Austin-Smith, ‘Secrets, Lies, and "Virtuous Attachments": The Ambassadors and The 39 Steps’, in Susan Griffin and Alan Nadel (eds.), The Men Who Knew Too Much: Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 35–47.

76. Murray Pomerance, ‘Hitchcock’s American Scapes’, Alfred Hitchcock’s America (Cambridge: Polity, 2013), pp. 18–70.

Name: Alfred Hitchcock (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Neil Badmington. ‘Will there ever be an end to the supply of books about Alfred Hitchcock?’, pleaded the Times Literary Supplement in 2008. It is a fair question for, as Michael Walker pointed out in Hitchcock’s Motifs, more has been written...
Categories: Social & Cultural History, British Cinema, Film History