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The Hip Hop and Religion Reader

Edited by Monica R. Miller, Anthony B. Pinn

Routledge – 2014 – 496 pages

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  • Pre-Order NowPaperback: $49.95
    978-0-415-74101-9
    November 16th 2014
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  • Pre-Order NowHardback: $135.00
    978-0-415-74100-2
    November 16th 2014
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Description

Edited by two recognized scholars of African-American religion and culture, this reader, the first of its kind, provides the essential texts for an important and emerging field of study – religion and hip hop. Until now, the discipline of religious studies lacked a consistent and coherent text that highlights the developing work at the intersections of hip hop, religion and theology. Moving beyond an institutional understanding of religion and offering a multidimensional assortment of essays, this new volume charts new ground by bringing together voices who, to this point, have been a disparate and scattered few. Comprehensively organized with the foundational and most influential works that continue to provide a base for current scholarship, The Hip Hop and Religion Reader frames the lively and expanding conversation on hip hop’s influence on the academic study of religion.

Contents

Contents: Acknowledgements. General Introduction—Monica R. Miller & Anthony B. Pinn. Section I Setting the Context, Framing the Discussion. 1. Michael Eric Dyson: Performance, Protest, and Prophecy in the Culture of Hip-Hop. 2. Anthony B. Pinn: Making a World with a Beat: Musical Expression’s Relationship to Religious Identity and Experience.3. Greg Dimitriadis: Hip Hop to Rap: Some Implications of an Historically Situated Approach to Performance. 4. H. Samy Alim: A New Research Agenda: Exploring the Transglobal Hip Hop Umma. Section II What’s the ‘Religion’ in Hip Hop? 5. Monica R. Miller: Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover. 6. Joseph Winters: Unstrange Bedfellows: Hip Hop and Religion. 7. John L. Jackson: Peter Piper Picked Peppers, but Humpty Dumpty Got Pushed: The Productively Paranoid Stylings of Hip-hop’s Spirituality. Section III The Religious Aesthetics of Hip Hop Culture. 8. Margarita L. Simon: Intersecting Points: The ‘Erotic as Religious’ in the Lyrics of Missy Elliott. 9. Elonda Clay: Two Turntables and a Microphone: Turntablism, Ritual and Implicit Religion. 10. Angela M. Nelson: ‘God’s Smiling on You and He’s Frowning Too’: Rap and the Problem of Evil. 11. Martina Viljoen: ‘Wrapped Up’: Ideological Setting and Figurative Meaning in African American Gospel Rap. 12. Racquel Cepeda: AfroBlue: Incanting Yoruba Gods in Hip Hop’s Isms. Section IV Hip Hop and/in Religious Traditions. Islam. 13. Juan M. Floyd-Thomas: A Jihad of Words: The Evolution of African American Islam and Contemporary Hip-Hop. 14. H. Samy Alim: Re-inventing Islam with Unique Modern Tones: Muslim Hip Hop Artists as Verbal Mujahidin. 15. Felicia M. Miyakawa: The Five Percenter ‘Way of Life’. 16. Dervla Sara Shannahan and Qurra Hussain: Rap on ‘l’avenue’; Islam, aesthetics, authenticity and masculinities in the Tunisian rap scene. Christianity. 17. Josef Sorett: Believe me, this pimp game is very religious: Toward a religious history of hip hop. 18. Cheryl Kirk-Duggan and Marlon F. Hall: Put Down the Pimp Stick to Pick Up the Pulpit: The Impact of Hip Hop on the Black Church. 19. John B. Hatch: Rhetorical Synthesis through a (Rap)Prochement of Identities: Hip-Hop and the Gospel According to the Gospel Gangstaz. 20. Daniel White Hodge: Where My Dawgs At?: A Theology of Community. Judaism. 21.Judah Cohen: Hip-Hop Judaica: The Politics of Representin’ Heebster Heritage. 22. Malka Shabtay: RaGap’: Music and Identity Among Young Ethiopians in Israel. Eastern Religion. 23. Steven J. Rosen: Hip-Hop Hinduism: The Spiritual Journey of MC Yogi. 24. Ian Condry: Battling Hip-Hop Samurai. 25. Anthony Y.H. Fung: Western Style, Chinese Pop: Jay Chou’s Rap and Hip-Hop in China. Section V Hip Hop as Religion. 26. Siphiwe Ignatius Dube: Hate Me Now: An Instance of NAS as Hip-Hop’s Self-proclaimed Prophet and Messiah. 27. James Perkinson: Tupac Shakur as Ogou Achade: Hip hop Anger and Postcolonial Rancour Read from the Other Side. 28. Robin Sylvan: Rap Music, Hip Hop Culture and ‘the Future Religion of the World’. Conclusion—Monica R. Miller & Anthony B. Pinn. Contributors. Permissions. Index.

Name: The Hip Hop and Religion Reader (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Monica R. Miller, Anthony B. Pinn. Edited by two recognized scholars of African-American religion and culture, this reader, the first of its kind, provides the essential texts for an important and emerging field of study – religion and hip hop. Until now, the discipline of...
Categories: Religion, Religion & Popular Culture, Popular Music, Black Studies, Popular Culture, Religion in America, Religion & Music