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Playing God?

Genetic Determinism and Human Freedon, 2nd Edition

By Ted Peters

Foreword by Francis S. Collins

Routledge – 2003 – 264 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $33.95
    978-0-415-94249-2
    November 15th 2002
  • Add to CartHardback: $120.00
    978-0-415-94248-5
    December 5th 2002
    Currently out of stock

Description

Since the original publication of Playing God? in 1996, three developments in genetic technology have moved to the center of the public conversation about the ethics of human bioengineering. Cloning, the completion of the human genome project, and, most recently, the controversy over stem cell research have all sparked lively debates among religious thinkers and the makers of public policy. In this updated edition, Ted Peters illuminates the key issues in these debates and continues to make deft connections between our questions about God and our efforts to manage technological innovations with wisdom.

Reviews

"[Praise for the first edition] In this remarkable book, Ted Peters explores the fallacies of the 'gene myth' and presents a resounding array of arguments against this kind of all-encompassing genetic determinism." -- From the Foreword by Francis S. Collins Director, National Center for Human Genome Research

"[Praise for the first edition] The well-wrought ethical arguments complement Peters' sophisticated framing of issues facing geneticists today." -- Research News and Opportunities in Science and Theology

Author Bio

Ted Peters is Professor of Systematic Theology at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary and the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. He is the author of God-- The World's Future and the editor of Dialog, A Journal of Theology

Related Subjects

  1. Religion

Name: Playing God?: Genetic Determinism and Human Freedon, 2nd Edition (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Ted PetersForeword by Francis S. Collins. Since the original publication of Playing God? in 1996, three developments in genetic technology have moved to the center of the public conversation about the ethics of human bioengineering. Cloning, the completion of the human genome project, and, most...
Categories: Religion