1st Edition

COVID-19 and Gender-Based Violence in Zimbabwe Women's Pandemic Experiences and Lessons for the Future

Edited By Isaiah Munyiswa, Pauline Mateveke, Ezra Chitando Copyright 2025
    212 Pages
    by Routledge

    This book investigates the experiences of women in Zimbabwe facing COVID-19 and gender-based violence, arguing that the insights from this extremely tough period could be used as a springboard for positive legal, cultural and policy changes.

     

    In 2020, COVID-19 caught the world by surprise, and often the socio-cultural factors impacting the treatment and care of those infected by the virus were not fully considered. In Zimbabwe, the socially constructed role of women as caregivers left them particularly vulnerable. Not only this, but COVID-19 lockdowns coincided with particularly high levels of sexual exploitation and gender-based violence, with women again comprising the majority of victims. Authors in this book analyse the pandemic experiences of women in Zimbabwe, both in the workplace or in the home, with the hope of fostering positive cultural change, and sensitising policy-makers to the need for legislation that protects women in moments of disasters.

     

    The important lessons and discussion points raised by this book will be important to policymakers both within Zimbabwe and beyond, and to researchers working on gender, public health, philosophy, sociology, and politics in Africa.

    INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 and Gender-Based Violence in Zimbabwe: Women's Pandemic Experiences and Lessons for the Future

    ISAIAH MUNYISWA, PAULINE MATEVEKE AND EZRA CHITANDO

     

    1.      The COVID-19 Pandemic and Gender-Based Violence in Zimbabwe

    NOMATTER SANDE AND SOPHIA CHIRONGOMA

     

    2.      The Intersectionality of Culture, Religion, Gender and COVID-19: Implications for Indigenous Women’s Health and Wellbeing in Zimbabwe

    BEATRICE TARINGA

     

    3.      Utilizing the African Duality Theory for Gender Equality during Pandemics UCHENNA L. OGBONNAYA AND JOYLINE GWARA

     

    4.      Philosophical reflections on intimate partner violence (IPV) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Zimbabwe

    ELIAS G. KONYANA

     

    5.      The feminine quadrant of girlhood, motherhood, wifehood, and widowhood in Titus 2:3-5: A hermeneutical discussion in the context of Christian women, HIV and AIDS, and COVID-19 in Zimbabwe

    LOVEJOY CHABATA

     

    6.      Women’s Organizations vs Organizing Women? Questioning Silences and Selective (Re)presentation of Women in a COVID-19 Context in Zimbabwe

    MOLLY MANYONGANISE

     

    7.      Women, Religion, Socio-Cultural Beliefs and the HIV/AIDS and COVID-19 Pandemics in Zimbabwe

    TABONA SHOKO AND TRACEY CHIRARA

     

    8.      Media framing of Covid-19 gender-based violence in Zimbabwe: The case of the Herald, Daily News and NewsDay (2019 - 2022)

    CHIPO MUSOKO

     

    9.      ‘Stay-at-Home’, A double Edged Consequential Policy: The Case of Zimbabwean Women During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    THADDEUS IGBALUMUN AGBER

     

    10.  Structural Violence and /as a Pandemic in Crisis Communication: Has the Media done Justice to Women’s Sexual Reproductive Rights?

    KACHEPA NYARI AND CHIVANDIKWA NEHEMIAH

     

    11.  The Media and Dynamics of COVID- 19 Vaccine Acceptance - Hesitance among Harare Central Prison Camp Prison Female Participants

    CHIRARA GLORY RUVARASHE AND CHIVANDIKWA NEHEMIAH

     

    12.  Medical Experts on Religious Influencers’ Framing of COVID-19 Risk Communication: Implications on Women

    DENISH SHORAYI, MAKOMBORERO BOWA AND NEHEMIAH CHIVANDIKWA

     

    13.  Pandemics as Disability: Reflections on the Feminisation of Care During Pandemics in Zimbabwe

    TSIIDZAI MATSIKA

     

    14.  Gender-based Violence Reports in Zimbabwe During the Covid-19 Pandemic and the Danger of Advocacy Inflation

    ISAIAH MUNYISWA AND KHAHLISO MAHULA

     

    CONCLUSION

    ISAIAH MUNYISWA, PAULINE MATEVEKE AND EZRA CHITANDO

    Biography

    Isaiah Munyiswa (PhD) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the National University of Lesotho. He teaches courses in Political Philosophy, Critical Thinking Skills and Textual Analysis. His research interests are in the capabilities approach to human development, citizenship studies, Economic Philosophy and the Philosophy of Well-being.

     

    Pauline Mateveke (PhD) Is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English and Media Studies at the University of Zimbabwe.  She is an African literature and culture scholar whose research interests include, gender, sexuality, Popular Culture, political and social themes on Africa.

     

    Ezra Chitando (PhD) is a Professor of Phenomenology of Religion in the Department of Philosophy, Religion and Ethics at the University of Zimbabwe. His broad research and publication interests include method and theory in the study of religion, as well as religion, health, gender, security, politics, development, climate change, and sexuality, among others.