Consulting in a Nutshell : A practical guide to successful general practice consultations before, during and beyond the MRCGP book cover
SAVE
$6.59
1st Edition

Consulting in a Nutshell
A practical guide to successful general practice consultations before, during and beyond the MRCGP




  • Available for pre-order. Item will ship after November 26, 2020
ISBN 9780367456955
November 26, 2020 Forthcoming by CRC Press
192 Pages - 35 Color & 19 B/W Illustrations

 
SAVE ~ $6.59
was $32.95
USD $26.36

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

‘…a unique book, written by a unique GP. There is no-one better placed to pull together decades of learning and experience on how to achieve the greatest success in the general practice consultation. The relaxed pace of writing, the accessible examples, the clear narrative and the engaging anecdotes make this a resource that it is accessible and useful to all who seek to improve their clinical consulting skills.’

Helen Stokes-Lampard, former Chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners

This brand-new book aims to help GPs establish ways of thinking, talking and behaving in the consultation that are most likely to lead to good outcomes. It describes a simple three-part approach to the consultation’s essential task, which is to convert a patient’s problem into a plan acceptable to both patient and doctor. It combines reader-friendly explanations, helpful illustrations and examples from everyday practice.

Key features:

  • Written by a respected GP, teacher, and author of the highly-regarded trilogy The Inner Consultation, The Inner Apprentice and The Inner Physician
  • Gives GPs a framework for consulting that is easy to remember, comprehensive, adaptable, robust, exam-friendly and quickly becomes second nature
  • Identifies and addresses key areas of anxiety for GP trainees and MRCGP candidates, including ‘How do I complete in 10 minutes?’, ‘How do I deal with difficult patients?’ and ‘What do I do when it all goes pear-shaped and I don’t know what to do?’
  • Gives advice and practical suggestions for how to make the difficult transition from theory to practice, from reading about the consultation to actually doing it better in real life

Consulting in a Nutshell will help GPs at every career stage – from medical student to CSA candidate to experienced practitioner – to analyse, develop and grow their personal consulting style. Coming at a time of profound change in primary care, it aims to ensure that seeing patients and having good consultations becomes and remains a source of satisfaction and fulfilment.

The author:
Roger Neighbour is a retired GP, former Convenor of the Panel of MRCGP Examiners, and past President, Royal College of General Practitioners, UK.

Table of Contents

FOREWORD: Prof. Helen Stokes-Lampard

PREFACE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR, ILLUSTRATOR AND FOREWORD WRITER

  1. AS WE BEGIN
  2. THE BIG PICTURE
  3. What are the goals of the consultation?

    Converting a problem into a plan

    Whose version of the problem?

    What good consulting is, and is not

    What consultation models are, and are not

    Something else consultation models are not

    How does the ‘three-part’ framework fit in with other consultation models?

    Do we really need another model of the consultation?

    ‘Doctor-centred’ or ‘patient-centred’?

  4. THE CONSULTATION IN A NUTSHELL
  5. The ‘right’ problem’

    A typical consultation

    The three-part consultation

    More about the Patient’s part

    More about the Doctor’s part

    More about the Shared part

    Transitions

    Before we move on

  6. MAKING A SUCCESS OF THE THREE-PART CONSULTATION
  7. Making a success of the Patient’s part

    ‘Telling-the-doctor-all-about-it’ mode

    Greetings and introductions

    Rapport

    Paying attention

    Starting the Patient’s part

    Keeping it going

    Give ‘receipts’ for important points in the patient’s story

    Don’t ‘medicalise’ too soon

    Ideas, concerns and expectations

    How long should the Patient’s part last?

    Summarise

    In conclusion

    More about receipts

    Receipting emotions

    What and when to receipt

    Two-part ‘steering’ remarks

    Turning a receipt

    Using receipts in the Patient’s part

    Cues and hidden agenda

    Cues

    Hidden agenda

    Health beliefs

    Cues and hidden agenda in the CSA

    Transitioning from the Patient’s part to the Doctor’s part

    Summarising as a transition

    Transitioning without a summary

    Introducing the Doctor’s part

    Making a success of the Doctor’s part

    Things you might include in the Doctor’s part

    Sequencing your questions

    Physical examination

    Adding your own agenda to the consultation

    Knowing when to stop

    Transitioning from the Doctor’s part to the Shared part

    Making the transition

    ‘Plan A’

    Making a success of the Shared part

    Does shared decision-making matter?

    Why is the Shared part difficult?

    Explaining

    Options and choice

    Shared decision-making

    Thinking aloud

    Checking for understanding

    Safety-netting

    Closing the consultation

    More about thinking aloud

  8. SOME PARTICULAR CHALLENGES
  9. Four things that will get you out of most difficulties

    The patient with a list

    ‘While I’m here, Doctor …’

    The potentially time-consuming consultation

    The uncommunicative patient

    The over-talkative patient

    The emotional patient

    Breaking bad news

    When it all goes wrong

    Telephone and video consultations

    Preparing for the CSA

  10. BEFORE YOU GO …

Index

...
View More

Author(s)

Biography

Roger Neighbour OBE MA MB BChir DSc FRCP FRCGP FRACGP

Roger qualified from King’s College, Cambridge, and St Thomas’ Hospital. After vocational training in Watford, he practised as a GP in Abbot’s Langley, Hertfordshire, from 1974 to 2003. He was a trainer and programme director with the Watford Vocational Training Scheme for many years, an MRCGP examiner for 20 years, and the Royal College of General Practitioners’ Chief Examiner from 1997 to 2002. In 2003 he was elected President of the RCGP for a three-year term. In 2011 he was awarded an OBE for services to medical education.

Having studied experimental psychology instead of biochemistry as an undergraduate, Roger found himself fascinated by the psychology of the consultation and the doctor-patient relationship in general practice. This interest led him to write his ‘Inner’ trilogy: The Inner Consultation (1987), The Inner Apprentice (1992) and The Inner Physician (2016). A collection of his medico-philosophical writings, I’m Too Hot Now, was published in 2005.

Now retired from clinical practice, Roger continues to write, teach and lecture in the UK and worldwide on consulting skills and medical education. He plays the violin to semi-professional standard, and enjoys spending time at his second home in Normandy.