Crime II: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Crime II

1st Edition

Edited by Philip Bean

Routledge

1,650 pages

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Hardback: 9781138015043
pub: 2015-11-03
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A new title from Routledge, Crime II is an essential successor to the editor’s earlier collection, published to acclaim in 2002.

Bean’s Crime (978-0-415-25264-5) (2002) was the first comprehensive anthology of the field’s canonical and cutting-edge research, and this new four-volume assembly of major works now takes full account of the many important developments that have taken place since its appearance. For example, in many jurisdictions, crime prevention has become a more dominant theme. The reduction in crime rates, alongside a similar fall in the extent of drug abuse, has also required a reappraisal of many earlier theories of the links with crime and selected social factors. Crime II reflects these and other changes, as well as anticipating those not yet fully formulated in the academy.

With a full index, together with a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which places the collected material in its historical and intellectual context, Crime II is an indispensable work of reference. Alongside its predecessor, it is destined to be valued by scholars, students, and researchers as a vital research resource.

* * *

Philip Bean is Emeritus Professor of Criminology at the University of Loughborough, and was formerly Director of the Midlands Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice. He was president of the British Society of Criminology (1996 to 1999) and from 2000 to 2006 he was an Associate of the General Medical Council. Bean is the author of many essential Routledge books, including Drugs and Crime, 4th edn. (forthcoming, 2014). His other publications include Madness and Crime (Willan, 2007) and Legalising Drugs (Policy Press, 2010).

Table of Contents

Volume I

Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Part 1: Criminology and Crime Prevention

1. D. Garland and R. Sparks, ‘Criminology, Social Theory and the Challenge of Our Times’, British Journal of Criminology 40 2000, 189-204.

2. J. Braithwaite, ‘The New Regulatory State and the Transformation of Criminology’, British Journal of Criminology 40, 2000, 222-238.

3. I. Loader and R. Sparks, ‘The Condition of Contemporary Criminology’, Public Criminology (Routledge, 2011), pp. 10-37.

4. J. H. Laub, ‘Edwin H. Sutherland and the Michael-Adler Report: Searching for the Soul of Criminology Seventy Years Later’, Criminology 44, 2, 2004, 235-257.

5. F. Zimring, ‘Criminology and its Discontents: The American Society of Criminology 2007 Sutherland Address’, Criminology 46, 2, 2008, 255-266.

6. A. Ashworth, ‘Criminal Justice, Not Criminology’, in M. Bosworth and C. Hoyle (eds), What is Criminology? (Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 335-345.

7. R. Clarke, ‘Seven Misconceptions of Situational Crime Prevention’, in N. Tilley (ed), Handbook of Crime Prevention and Community Safety (Willan, 2005), pp. 39-70.

8. P. Ekblom, ‘Designing Products Against Crime’, in N. Tilley (ed), Handbook of Crime Prevention and Community Safety (Willan, 2005), pp. 203 -244

9. G. Laycock, ‘Implementing Crime Reduction Measures: Conflicts and Tensions’, in J. Knutsson and R. Clarke (eds), Putting Theory to Work (Crime Prevention Studies) Vol. 20, 2006, pp. 65-88.

10. K. Pease, ‘Crime Science’, in S. Shoham, P. Knapper and M. Kett (eds), International Handbook of Criminology (CRC Press, 2010), pp. 3-22.

11. L. Sherman, D. P. Farrington, B. C. Welsh amd D. L. MacKenzie, ‘Preventing Crime’, in L. Sherman, D. P. Farrington, B. C. Welsh and D. L. MacKenzie (eds), Evidence Based Crime Prevention (Routledge, 2006), pp. 1-12.

 

Part 2: Theories of Crime

12. P. Rock, ‘Sociological Theories of Crime’, in M. Maguire (ed), The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, 4th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2007),pp.3-42.

13. P. Rock, ‘Caesare Lombroso as a Signal Criminologist’, Criminology and Criminal Justice 7, 2, 2007, 117- 134.

14. R. Agnew, ‘Building on the Foundations of General Strain Theory: Specifying the Types of Strain Most Likely to Lead to Crime and Delinquency’, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 38, 4, 2001, 319-361.

15. J. Simon, ‘The "Society of Captives" in the Era of Hyper-Incarceration’, Theoretical Criminology 4, 3, 2000, 285- 308.

16. D. P. Farrington, ‘Explaining and Preventing Crime: The Globalisation of Knowledge – The American Society of Criminology 1999 Presidential Address’, Criminology 38, 1, 2000, 1-24.

17. P. Bean, ‘Legalisation and Crime’, in Legalising Drugs (Policy Press, 2010), pp. 59-84.

18. D. Nutt, L. A. King, W. Saulsbury and C. Blakemore, ‘Development of a Rational Scale to Assess Harm of Drugs of Potential Misuse’, The Lancet 369, 2007, 1047-1053.

19. N. Christie, ‘Victim Movements at a Crossroad’. Punishment and Society 12, 2, 2010, 115-122.

20. M. Levi, ‘Financial Crimes in Comparative Context’, in S, Shoham, P. Knapper and M. Kett (eds), International Handbook of Criminology (Routledge, 2010), pp. 309-342.

 

 

Volume II

Contents

Acknowledgements

 

Part 3: Crime and the Criminals

21. P-O Wikstrom, D. Oberwittler, K. Treiber and B. Hardie, ‘Situational Action Theory’, in Breaking Rules: The Social and Situational Dynamics of Young People`s Urban Crime (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 3-45.

22. P-O Wikstrom, D. Oberwittler, K. Treiber and B. Hardie, ‘It’s All About Interactions’, in Breaking Rules: The Social and Situational Dynamics of Young People`s Urban Crime (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 405-410.

23. J. Laub and R. Sampson, ‘Rethinking Lives in and Out of Crime’, Shared Beginnings, Divergent Lives: Delinquent Boys to Age 70 (Harvard University Press, pp. 275-293.

24. A. Bottoms, J. Shapland, A. Costello, D. Holmes and G. Muir, ‘Towards Desistance: Theoretical Underpinnings for an Empirical Study’, The Howard Journal 43, 4, 2004, 368-389.

25. J. Rumgay, ‘Scripts for Safer Survival: Pathways Out of Female Crime’, The Howard Journal 43, 4, 2004, 405-419.

26. M. M. Kurlycheck, R. Brame and S. D. Bushway, ‘Enduring Risk: Old Criminal Records and Predictions of Future Criminal Behaviour’, Crime and Delinquency 53, 1, 2007, 64-83.

27. S. Bushway, P. Nieuwbeerta and A. Blokland, ‘The Predictive Value of Criminal Background Checks: Do Age and Criminal History Affect Time to Redemption?’, Criminology 49, 1, 2011, 27-60.

28. K. Soothill and B. Francis, ‘When do Ex-Offenders become Like Non-Offenders?’, The Howard Journal 48, 4, 2009, 373-387.

29. V. J. Webb, C. M. Katz and S. Decker, ‘Assessing the Validity of Self-Reports by Gang Members: Results from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program’, Crime and Delinquency 52, 2, 2006, 232-252.

30. P. Lussier, D. P. Farrington and T. Moffit, ‘Is the Antisocial Child Father of the Abusive Man? A 40-Year Prospective Longitudinal Study on the Developmental Antecedents of Intimate Partner Violence’, Criminology 47, 3, 2009, 741-780.

 

 

Part 4: Psychiatry, the Media and the Law

31. J. Coid et al., The National Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity Among Prisoners and the Future of Prison Health Care’, Medicine Science and the Law 42, 3, 2002, 245-250.

32. T. Grisso, ‘Reasons for Concern about Mental Disorders of Adolescent Offenders’, in Double Jeopardy: Adolescent Offenders with Mental Disorder University of Chicago Press, 2006), pp. 3-26.

33. J. Peay, ‘Personality Disorder and the Law: Some Awkward Questions’, Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 18, 3, 2011, 231-244

34. R. Reiner, ‘Media-Made Criminality: The Representation of Crime in the Mass Media’, Oxford Handbook of Criminology, 4th edition, (Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 302-337.

35. M. Levi, ‘The Media Construction of White-Collar Crime’, British Journal of Criminology 46, 6, 2006, 1037-1057.

36. R. Reiner, ‘Policing and the Media, in T. Newburn (ed), Handbook of Policing, 2nd edition (Willan, 2008), pp. 313-336.

37. K. Soothill, M. Peelo, B. Francis, J. Pearson and E. Ackerley’, ‘Homicide and the Media: Identifying the Top Cases in The Times’, The Howard Journal 41, 5, 401-421.

38. G. H. Gudjonsson, ‘Investigative Interviewing’, in T. Newburn, T. Williamson and A. Wright (eds) Handbook of Criminal Investigation (Willan, 2007), pp. 466-492.

39. S. Shute, R. Hood and F. Sumingal, ‘Perceiving Racial Bias’, in A Fair Hearing: Ethnic Minorities in the Courts (Willan, 2005), pp. 42-60.

40. L. Blom-Cooper , ‘Judge and Jury or Judge Alone’, Medicine Science and the Law 44, 1, 2004, 6-18.

41. G. Zellick, ‘The Scales of Justice: Do They Need Rebalancing? A Non-Politician Looks at the Criminal Justice System’, Medicine Science and the Law 47, 2, 2007, 96-106.

Volume III

Contents

Acknowledgements

Part 5: Problem Solving Courts and Restorative Justice

42. J. L. Nolan, Jr., ‘Problem Solving and Courts of Law’, in Legal Accents, Legal Borrowing: The International Problem-Solving Court Movement (Princeton University Press, 2009), pp. 7-23.

43. J. Braithwaite, ‘Principles of Restorative Justice’, in A. von Hirsch, J. Roberts and A. Bottoms (eds), Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice (Hart Publishing, 2003), pp. 1-20.

44. A. Ashworth, ‘Responsibilities, Rights, and Restorative Justice’. British Journal of Criminology 42, 2002, 578-595.

45. A. Bottoms, ‘Some Sociological Reflections on Restorative Justice’, in A. von Hirsch, J. Roberts and A. Bottoms (eds), Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice (Hart Publishing, 2003), pp. 79-113.

46. D. W. Van Ness, ‘Prisons and Restorative Justice’, G. Johnstone and D. W. Van Ness (eds), Handbook of Restorative Justice (Willan 2006), pp. 312-324.

 

47. C. Hoyle, ‘Policing and Restorative Justice’, in G. Johnstone and D. W. Van Ness (eds), Handbook of Restorative Justice (Willan, 2006), pp. 292-311.

48. J. Bonta, R. Jesseman, T. Rugge and R. Cormier, ‘Restorative Justice and Recidivism: Promises Made, Promises Kept?’, in D. Sullivan and L. Tifft (eds), Handbook of Restorative Justice (Routledge, 2006), pp. 108-120.

 

Part 6: Prisons, Probation and Police

49. J. McNight, ‘Speaking Up For Probation’, The Howard Journal 48, 4, 2009, 327-343.

50. F. S. Taxman, ‘Probation, Intermediate Sanctions and Community Based Corrections’, in J. Petersilia and K. Reitz (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Sentencing and Corrections (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 363-385.

51. A. Worral, ‘Gender and Probation in the Second World War: Reflections on a Changing Occupational Culture’, Criminology and Criminal Justice 8, 3, 2008, 317-334.

52. M. Tonry, ‘Explanations of American Punishment Policies: A National History’, Punishment and Society 11, 3, 2009, 377-394.

53. L. Wacquant, ‘Deadly Symbiosis: When Ghetto and Prison Meet and Merge’, Punishment and Society 3, 1, 2001, 96-134.

54. Z. Bauman, ‘Social Issues of Law and Order’, British Journal of Criminology 40, 2000, 205-221.

55. R. D. King, ‘The Effects of Supermax Custody’, in A. Leibling and S. Maruna (eds), Effects of Imprisonment (Willan, 2005), pp. 118-145.

56. E. Crawley and R. Sparks, ‘Hidden Injuries? Rethinking the Experience of Older Men in English Prisons’, The Howard Journal 44, 4, 2005, 345-356.

57. E. Genders and E. Player, ‘Rehabilitation, Risk Management and Prisoners’ Rights’, Criminology and Criminal Justice 14, 4, 2013, 1-24.

58. A. Leibling, ‘Moral Performance, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment and Prison Pain’, Punishment and Society 13, 5, 2011, 530- 550.

59. A. Leibling and B. Crewe, ‘Prisons Beyond the New Penology: The Shifting Moral Foundations of Prison Management’, in J. Simon and R. Sparks (eds), Sage Handbook of Punishment and Society (Sage, 2013), pp. 283- 307.

60. R. Reiner, ‘Who Governs? Democracy, Plutocracy, Science and Prophecy in Policing’, Criminology and Criminal Justice13, 2, 2013, 161-180.

61. P. Bean, ‘Informers and Corruption’, in Drugs and Crime,4th Edition (Routledge, 2014), pp. 184-202.

 

 

Volume IV

Contents

Acknowledgements

Part 7: New Directions, New Developments

62. G. LaFree and L. Dugan, ‘Terrorism and Countering Terrorism’, in M. Tonry (ed), Crime and Justice Volume 38 (University of Chicago Press, 2009), pp. 413-477.

63. J. Goodey, ‘Human Trafficking: Sketchy Data and Policy Responses’, Criminology and Criminal Justice 8, 4, 2008, 421-442.

64. S. Cohen, ‘Neither Honesty nor Hypocrisy: The Legal Reconstruction of Torture’, in T. Newburn and P. Rock (eds), The Politics of Crime Control (Oxford University Press, 2006), pp. 297-317.

65. P. Bierne, ‘From Animal Abuse to Interhuman Violence? A Critical Review of the Progression Thesis’, Society and Animals 12, 1, 2004, 39-65.

66. N. South, A. Brisman and P. Bierne, ‘A Guide to a Green Criminology’, in N. South and A. Brisman (eds), (Willan, 2013), pp. 27-42.

67. Y. Jewkes, ‘Policing the Net: Crime Regulation and Surveillance in Cyberspace’, in Y. Jewkes (ed), Dot.cons: Crime Deviancy and Identity in the Internet (Willan, 2003), pp.15-35.

68. J. Bryce, ‘Online Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People’, in Y. Jewkes and M. Tar (eds), Handbook of Internet Crime (Willan, 2010), pp. 320-342.

69. H. Croall, ‘Food Crime’, in P. Bierne and N. South (eds), Issues in Green Criminology (Willan, 2007), pp. 206-229.

70. J. Short, M. Zahn and D. Farrington, ‘Experimental Research in Criminal Justice Settings: Is There a Role for Scholarly Societies?’, Crime and Delinquency 46, 3 2000, 295- 298.

71. E. Burney, ‘Crime and Criminology in the Eye of the Novelist: Trends in Nineteenth Century Literature’, The Howard Journal 51, 2, 2012, 160-172.

 

Index

About the Editor

Philip Bean is Emeritus Professor of Criminology at the University of Loughborough, and was formerly Director of the Midlands Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice. He was president of the British Society of Criminology (1996 to 1999) and from 2000 to 2006 he was an Associate of the General Medical Council. Bean is the author of many essential Routledge books, including Drugs and Crime, 4th edn. (forthcoming, 2014). His other publications include Madness and Crime (Willan, 2007) and Legalising Drugs (Policy Press, 2010).

About the Series

Critical Concepts in Criminology

Edited and introduced by leading experts in the field, Routledge’s Major Works collections are designed to meet today’s research, reference, and teaching needs. The Critical Concepts in Criminology series includes a number of titles within the subject area of Crime and Criminal Justice. An area of interest with a fast expanding body of literature, titles within this series provide an authoritative look at some of the key areas of interest within Criminology.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC004000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Criminology