Critique and Radical Discourses on Crime  book cover
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Critique and Radical Discourses on Crime




ISBN 9781138736115
Published November 27, 2019 by Routledge
160 Pages

 
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Book Description

This title was first published in 2000:  Critique and Radical Discourses on Crime develops a unique line of thought in contemporary criminology, re-examining an under-researched dimension of radical discourse. In particular, it focuses attention on the distinguishing feature of radical discourses, their allegiance to various visions of critique. The book reassesses the genres of critique evident in previous forms of radical criminology, formulates a different genre of critique appropriate to the uncertainties of postmodern conditions and, shows how these genres can be articulated to differently conceived radical discourses on crime.

Table of Contents

Introduction: what lies in wait...Radical Criminology and the Twilight of Critical Judgement: A grammar of modern critique: judgement, criteria and progress; Radical criminology’s judgemental genres of critique; Amidst the ruins of judgement. Governmental Critique’s Logos of Crimen: The art of post-disciplinary critique: a governmental grammar; Of Logos: from whence to speak; Of Crimen: governmental accusations in the name of crime; Epilogue: ambitions and insinuations; Bibliography.

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Author(s)

Biography

George Pavlich

Reviews

’...a major tour de force...an absorbing and stimulating work which makes a very significant contribution to the literature in this field...provides a very timely antidote to what has become of late, with a few notable exceptions, a criminology which had largely lost its critical way. For this, the author is to be congratulated.’ Professor W.G. Carson, Emeritus Professor, University of Melbourne, Australia ’...a scholarly and erudite manuscript which will make a first rate contribution to the literature...Overall I believe the manuscript succeeds in providing a coherent argument out of a large and disparate set of literatures.’ Professor Pat O’Malley, La Trobe University, Australia