Defending the Revolution : The Church of Scotland 1689–1716 book cover
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Defending the Revolution
The Church of Scotland 1689–1716




ISBN 9781409401346
Published July 25, 2013 by Routledge
354 Pages

 
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Book Description

The 'Glorious Revolution' of 1688-90 played a fundamental role in re-shaping the political, religious and cultural map of the British Isles. Yet, as this book demonstrates, many key elements of the history of the period between the landing of William of Orange and the establishment of the Union between Scotland and England, remain shadowy. In particular, the religious and theological underpinnings of the Revolution in Scotland have received scant attention compared to discussions of events in England, and Ireland. This book sets out to show how the religious dimension of the revolution settlement in Scotland while comprehensively Presbyterian, was not inevitable, revealing instead the degree of political and religious pressure that was brought to bear in order to press for a moderate settlement that took cognizance of the Episcopalian position. However, the outcome demonstrated the ability of Presbyterians to respond to the changing political circumstances and seize the opportunities they offered, enabling them to galvanise their support within parliament and secure a settlement that went beyond what William and Erastian-inclined Presbyterians would have preferred. Traditionally, treatment of the religious outcome in Scotland has been restricted to a bare narration of the significant acts of parliament - this book takes a more thorough and critical approach to explain not only the nature of the final settlement but how it was achieved, and the legacy it left for both Scotland and the newly forged British state.

Reviews

'... marvelous and formidable ... Defending the Revolution is, first and foremost, a political history of Scottish Presbyterianism from the waning days of the Restoration Killing Time through the aftermath of the Jacobite Rising of 1715.' Journal of British Studies