Food Forensics: Stable Isotopes as a Guide to Authenticity and Origin, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Food Forensics

Stable Isotopes as a Guide to Authenticity and Origin, 1st Edition

Edited by James F. Carter, Lesley A. Chesson

CRC Press

336 pages | 16 Color Illus. | 30 B/W Illus.

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pub: 2017-07-13
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Description

Food forensics is a multi-disciplinary science involving advanced analytical techniques, plant and animal metabolism, and sophisticated data interpretation tools. This book explains how plants, and in turn animals eating those plants, assimilate stable isotopes and trace elements from their environments. It provides extensive reviews of the use of stable isotope and trace element measurements for the authentication of major food groups and how these can be used to detect fraudsters. The book emphasises the use of correct methods for sample preparation and measurement so that data can be compared to existing datasets, with a dedicated chapter discussing interpretations.

Table of Contents

Isotope ratio measurements for food forensics

Introduction

Reporting and reference materials

Measurements

Good practice

Sampling, sample preparation and analysis

Introduction

Sampling

Practical sampling and sample preparation

Isotope ratio analysis - bio-elements (H, C, N, O, and S)

Isotope ratio analysis – radiogenic isotopes (Sr and Pb)

Interpreting stable isotope ratios in plants and plant-based foods

Our foods come from plants with different photosynthetic pathways

Photosynthetic pathway differences result in difference s in plant carbon isotope ratios

Genetic variations can lead to differences in carbon isotope ratios

Drought histories are recorded by enrichment of carbon isotopes of C3 plants

Shade and indoor growth are recorded depletions in carbon isotopes of plants

Different tissues can exhibit different 13C contents

The soil and atmospheric water environment is recorded as variations in hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in plants

Soil nitrogen sources are recorded in plant nitrogen isotopes

Fertilizer nitrogen isotope ratios

Sulfur isotopes in plants

Strontium isotopes in plants

Conclusions

Introduction to stable isotopes in food webs

A brief history of isotopes in foodweb ecology

Key considerations in studying food webs with isotopes

The spatial template: Isoscapes

Isotopic discrimination and physiological considerations

Hypothetical case studies

Combining tools

Data analysis interpretation: Forensic applications and examples

Introduction

Reporting of isotopic evidence in forensic casework

Common approaches for food isotope data analysis and interpretation

Likelihood-based data analysis approaches in food forensics

Conclusion

Flesh Foods, or What can stable isotope analysis reveal about the meat you eat?

Introduction

Review of isotopic variation in flesh foods

Conclusion

Fruits and vegetables

Introduction

Fruits, vegetables, and isotopes

Fruit juices

Determining countries or regions of origin

Tea

Coffee

Alcoholic Beverages I – Wine

Introduction

Sample preparation and analysis

Wine

Alcoholic Beverages II – Spirits, Beer, Sake and Cider

Spirit drinks

Beer

Sake or Saké

Cider, Cyder or Cidre

Stable isotope measurements and modeling to verify the authenticity of dairy products

Introduction

Current trends in food fraud and milk adulteration

Milk composition

Production and processing of milk

Milk isotopic fingerprint, a result of biogeochemical influence

Preparation of milk components for isotopic analysis

Application of stable isotope analysis to dairy products

An isoscape approach

Deliberate contamination – a case study

Edible vegetal oils

Introduction

Methods

Application of IRMS for detecting the authenticity of edible oils

Conclusions

Organic food authenticity

Introduction

Regulations

Discrimination between organic and conventional crops

Discrimination between organic and conventional products

Conclusion

Odds and ends, or, All that’s left to print

Introduction

Bottled water

Carbonated soft drinks

Caffeine

Vanilla/vanillin

Essential oils

Sweeteners

Eggs

Vinegar

Other food products

Isotope effects during food preparation

Conclusion

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
TEC012000
TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Food Science