Forensic Interpretation of Glass Evidence  book cover
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Forensic Interpretation of Glass Evidence




ISBN 9780849300691
Published June 27, 2000 by CRC Press
178 Pages

 
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Book Description

Intended for forensic scientists and students of the discipline, Forensic Interpretation of Glass Evidence provides the practicing forensic scientist with the necessary statistical tools and methodology to introduce forensic glass evidence into the laboratory. With free software available for downloading at the author's Web site, scientists can apply their own data and draw conclusions using principles practiced in the text.
This book contains an introductory chapter on glass evidence procedures and analysis before covering topics such as classical approaches to handling glass evidence, the application of Bayesian statistics to forensic science, and the use of histograms.
By presenting both the physical and chemical examinations performed on glass along with a recommended interpretation, the author allows readers the luxury of having all reference materials contained within a single book. Useful for case-working forensic scientists, this book is ideal for students of forensic science at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well anyone currently working in the field.

Table of Contents

Introduction
EXAMINATION OF GLASS
History
Flat glass
Float glass
Toughened glass
Laminated glass
Glass composition
Glass breakage under impact
Physical examinations
Examinations of large fragments
Examinations performed on small and large fragments
Elemental composition
Summary of Chapter 1
THE CONVENTIONAL APPROACH TO EVIDENCE INTERPRETATION
Data comparison
Statistical tests and grouping1
Coincidence probabilities
Summary of Chapter 2
THE BAYESIAN APPROACH TO EVIDENCE INTERPRETATION
Probability - some definitions
The laws of probability
Bayesian thinking in forensic glass analysis
Taking account of further analyses
Search strategy
Comparison of measurements: the continuous approach.
Summary of Chapter 3
GLASS FOUND AT RANDOM AND FREQUENCY OF GLASS
Relevant questions
Availability
Glass found at random (clothing surveys)
Comparison between suspect and general population: an example.
Estimation of the probability of finding at random i groups of j fragments
frequency of the analyzed characteristics
Control glass data collections
Clothing surveys
Characteristics of glass found on general population
Characteristics of glass found on suspect population
Comparison between suspect and general population: an example
Summary of Chapter 4
TRANSFER AND PERSISTENCE STUDIES
Transfer of glass
Persistence of glass on garments
Main results of the studies
Modeling glass transfer and making estimates
STATISTICAL TOOLS AND SOFTWARE
Data analysis
Calculating densities by hand
Computer programs
Summary of Chapter 6
REPORTING GLASS EVIDENCE
Verbalization of a likelihood ratio answer
Sensitivity of the a likelihood ratio answer to some of the data estimates
The effect of search procedures
Fallacy of the transposed conditional
REFERENCES

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Reviews

"…an outstanding text for trace examiners who provide statistical analysis of their data, or for those who wish to learn statistical treatment of evidence. An excellent set of references at the end of the book provides a thorough literature study of glass for those with the appropriate resources."
- Virginia M. Maxwell, State of Connecticut Forensic Laboratory, Meriden

"By presenting both the physical and chemical examinations performed on glass along with a recommended interpretation, the author allows readers the luxury of having all reference materials contained within a single book. Useful for case-working forensic scientists, this book is ideal for students of forensic science at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as anyone currently working in the field.
- ZI Ziegelindustrie International, September 2001

"Forensic Interpretation of Glass Evidence contains valuable information for the practising forensic glass examiner and should be included on any trace evidence bookshelf. Overall this book has made a good attempt at summarizing the scientific literature pertinent to forensic glass examination and has made a good first attempt at describing the interpretation of glass evidence in a Bayesian context."
-Mark Sandercock, M.Sc., RCMP Forensic Laboratory, Winnipeg, in Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal