Global Crime and Justice: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Global Crime and Justice

1st Edition

By David A. Jenks, John Randolph Fuller

Routledge

324 pages | 16 B/W Illus.

Look Inside
Purchasing Options:$ = USD
Paperback: 9781455777716
pub: 2016-12-12
$97.95
x
Hardback: 9781138693470
pub: 2016-12-12
$295.00
x
eBook (VitalSource) : 9781315439563
pub: 2016-12-08
from $48.98


FREE Standard Shipping!

Description

Global Crime and Justice offers a truly transnational examination of both deviance and social controls around the world. Unlike comparative textbooks detailing the criminal justice systems of a few select nations, or cataloging types of international crimes that span multiple legal jurisdictions, Global Crime and Justice provides a critical and integrated investigation into the nature of crime and how different societies react to it. The book first details various types of international crime, including genocide, war crimes, international drug and weapons smuggling, terrorism, slavery, and human trafficking. The second half covers international law, international crime control, the use of martial law, and the challenges of balancing public order with human and civil rights.

Global Crime and Justice is suitable for use in criminology and criminal justice departments, as well as in political science, international relations, and global studies programs. It will appeal to all who seek an academically rigorous and comprehensive treatment of the international and transnational issues of crime and social order.

Reviews

As the forces of globalization continue to reshape societies and impact relationships among and between nations, corporations, and individuals, David Jenks and John Fuller provide an excellent overview and analysis of the complex issues related to global crime and justice. Their new book not only defines global crime, but provides examples of the most prevalent types of global crime while contextualizing these behaviors and societies’ responses. Students and scholars alike will find this book essential in understanding crime in a global context. --Matthew S. Crow, Professor and Chair, Dept. of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of West Florida

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter

  1. GLOBAL CRIME IN CONTEXT: DEFINING AND MEASURING GLOBAL CRIME
  2. What do we mean when we say global crime?

    Crime and Culture

    Crime and Globalization

    Gender and Family

    Education

    Race and Ethnicity

    Religion

    Globalization and Crime in the Future

    Measuring Global Crime

    Methods of Measuring Crime

    Official Statistics

    Self-Report Studies

    Victimization Surveys

  3. COMPARATIVE AND TRANSNATIONAL CRIME
  4. Comparative Crime

    Homicide

    Sexual Assault

    Transnational Crime

    Black Markets

    Fraud

    Money Laundering

    Global Crime in Context

  5. HUMAN TRAFFICKING
  6. Introduction

    Human Trafficking: Definitions, History, and Scope

    Definitions

    The Difference Between Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling

    Critiques of the Definition of Human Trafficking

    History

    Scope

    Starting Points

    Pushes and Pulls

    Globalization and Economics

    Countries of Origination

    The Trafficked and The Traffickers

    People Who Are Trafficked

    Children

    Women

    Men

    Types of Exploitation

    Forced Non-sexual Labor

    Forced Sexual Labor

    The Traffickers

    On The Way

    The Destination

    The Response to Human Trafficking

  7. DRUG TRAFFICKING
  8. Drug Trafficking

    Heroin

    The Golden Crescent

    The Golden Triangle

    Latin America

    Cocaine

    The Trafficking of Amphetamine-Type Stimulants

    Methamphetamine

    Other Amphetamine-type Stimulants

    Cannabis

    Summary

  9. WEAPONS TRAFFICKING
  10. State Sponsored Weapons Sales/Trafficking

    Summary

  11. TERRORISM
  12. What is Terrorism?

    Terrorism and Crime

    Terrorist Groups

    Irish Republican Army (IRA)

    Liberation Tigers of Tamil Elam

    Hamas

    Hezbollah

    National Liberation Army (ELN)

    Al Qaeda

    Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL) and Boko Haram

    The United States as a Sponsor of Terrorism

    The Response to Terrorism

    Counter-terrorism, Anti-terrorism, and Counter-insurgency

    Terrorism Response around the World

    Terrorism Response in the United States

    Policing Terrorism

    Individual Rights and Data Collection

  13. INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY CRIME
  14. What is Information-Technology Crime?

    The Costs and Scope of Information-technology Crime

    What is Hacking?

    Types of Attacks and Attackers

    Motives for Information Technology Attacks

    Economic Motives

    Political Motives

    Personal Motives

    Trespassing and Vandalism

    Copyright Infringement

    Criminal Justice Response

    The Challenges of International Cooperation

    Governments as Law Enforcers and Lawbreakers

  15. INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW
  16. International Criminal Law- Origins

    Sources of International Criminal Law

    The International Criminal Court and International Court of Justice

    International Court of Justice

    The International Criminal Court

    Genocide

    Rwandan Genocide

    Crimes Against Humanity

    War Crimes

    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Crimes of Aggression

    The Future of International Criminal Law

    The United Nations

    Summary

  17. COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS
  18. Culture and Criminal Justice Systems

    Criminal Justice Systems Around The World

    Civil-law Systems

    Civil Law in Germany

    Police and Corrections in Germany

    Common-Law Systems

    Common Law in the United States

    Police and Corrections in the United States

    Socialist Law Systems

    Socialist Law in China

    Police and Corrections in China

    Islamic Law Systems

    Islamic Law in Iran

    Police and Corrections in Iran

  19. HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL CRIME CONTROL
  20. The Idea of Human Rights

    Human Rights Violations

    International Law and State Sovereignty

    Transnational and International Crime Control

    International Law Enforcement Organizations

    Europol

    U.N. Office of Drugs and Crime

    World Customs Organization

    Jurisdiction

    Martial Law and Military Intervention

  21. PRIVATIZATION AND GLOBAL JUSTICE
  22. Privatization of Police

    Privatization of the Courts

    Privatization of Corrections

    Private Prisons

    Private Probation

    Private Immigration Detention

    Privatization Concerns in the Global Arena

  23. THE FUTURE OF GLOBAL CRIME

Globalization and The Future of Crime

Violent Crime Then and Now

Culture and Crime

Balancing Privacy and Security

Future Questions

About the Authors

David A. Jenks received his Ph.D. from Florida State University and is currently the Interim Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and a Professor of Criminology at the University of West Georgia. His research interests vary, but are currently focused on comparative/international policing, organizational administration and leadership, and higher education. Dr. Jenks has worked for and with the International Scientific and Professional Advisory Council of the United Nations, the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces, the Los Angeles Police Department, and the United States Department of State.

John Randolph Fuller brings both an academic and an applied background to his scholarship in criminology. Fuller received his Bachelor of University Studies degree from the University of New Mexico and his Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the School of Criminology at Florida State University. Fuller has taught at the University of West Georgia since 1981 and has been recognized by students as a superior teacher and advisor. In 1991 he was named the College of Arts and Sciences Faculty Member of the Year, and in 2001 he was given Professor of the Year Award by the Honors College. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, Fuller published six books on topics ranging from juvenile delinquency to peacemaking criminology. He is a frequent presenter at meetings of both the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Additionally, he served as the Faculty Ombuds at the University of West Georgia, where he endeavored to resolve conflicts for faculty, students, and administrators.

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POL038000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Cultural Policy

eResources

Download the lecture slides

Instructor Resources
To gain access to the instructor resources for this title, please visit the  Instructor Resources Download Hub.

You will be prompted to fill out a registration form which will be verified by one of our sales reps.