1st Edition

Globalizing Sport
How Organizations, Corporations, Media, and Politics are Changing Sport





ISBN 9781594517587
Published January 30, 2011 by Routledge
272 Pages

USD $38.95

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Book Description

Sport is enjoyed by millions of people across the world, and both watching and playing sport constitutes a major part of modern leisure time. But sport is also a huge worldwide industry. In Globalizing Sport, George Sage invites readers to explore a deeper understanding of the global dynamics of sport - not only competitions but of the big businesses of money, media coverage, athletic apparel and more. He shows how phenomena such as migration, labour, commerce and politics affect the athletes and the fans, continually reshaping the business and experience of sport. Globalizing Sport puts sport in its political, economic and social context, revealing its connections with businesses, countries, media outlets and education systems.

Table of Contents

Preface Chapter 1

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Reviews

“Sage has done it again. His systematic research into ‘sport sociology’ is legion. With this book, he extends his mark by providing one of the few comprehensive treatments of globalization and sport. … Balanced in looking at worldwide coverage of sport played worldwide. Highly recommended.”
—CHOICE

“At long last, George Sage has given us the first comprehensive critical analysis of globalization and sport. From Nike to TV; from the Olympics to the Internet; Sage systematically probes the sources and consequences of global linkages and processes for athletes, fans, sport organizations and nation states. This is a must read for fans, critics, and scholars of sport.”
—Michael A. Messner, University of Southern California

“This book provides a much needed introduction to sport and globalization. Sage clearly articulates the economic, political, and cultural processes that shape global sport and, through his careful documentation, is able to illustrate the complexities and tensions of globalization processes.”
—Becky Beal, California State University-Eastbay