Health and Welfare in St. Petersburg, 1900–1941: Protecting the Collective, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Health and Welfare in St. Petersburg, 1900–1941

Protecting the Collective, 1st Edition

By Christopher Williams

Routledge

310 pages | 26 B/W Illus.

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Hardback: 9780754655343
pub: 2018-07-02
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pub: 2018-06-12
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Description

In the first book to chart late Imperial and Soviet health policy and its impact on the health of the collective in Russia’s former capital and second "regime" city, Christopher Williams argues that in pre-revolutionary St. Petersburg radical sections of the medical profession and the Bolsheviks highlighted the local and Tsarist government’s failure to protect the health of poor peasants and the working class due to conflicts over the priority and direction of health policy, budget constraints and political division amongst doctors. They sought to forge alliances to change the law on social insurance and to prioritise the health of the collective. Situating pre- and post-revolutionary health policies in the context of revolutions, civil war, market transition and Stalin’s rise to power, Williams shows how attempts were made to protect the Body Russian/Soviet and to create a healthier lifestyle and environment for key members of the new Soviet state. This failed due to shortages of money, ideology and Soviet medical and cultural norms. It resulted in ad hoc interventions into people’s lives and the promotion of medical professionalization, and then the imposition of restrictions resulting from changes in the Party line. Williams shows that when the health of the collective was threatened and created medical disorder, it led to state coercion.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. The "Body Russian" in Tsarist St. Petersburg

2. The Health of the Petrograd Collective Under War Communism, 1918-20

3. Health, Class and the Market Under N.E.P., 1921-27

4. Health Plans, Medical Disorder and Repression: The Health of the Collective in Crisis, 1928-41

Conclusion

About the Author

Christopher Williams is former head of the Department of History and Politics and former Professor of Modern History at Liverpool Hope University, UK.

About the Series

The History of Medicine in Context

An interest in medicine is one of the constants that re-occurs throughout history. From the earliest times, man has sought ways to combat the myriad of diseases and ailments that afflict the human body, resulting in a number of evolving and often competing philosophies and practices whose repercussions spread far beyond the strictly medical sphere.

For more than a decade The History of Medicine in Context series has provided a unique platform for the publication of research pertaining to the study of medicine from broad social, cultural, political, religious and intellectual perspectives. Offering cutting-edge scholarship on a range of medical subjects that cross chronological, geographical and disciplinary boundaries, the series consistently challenges received views about medical history and shows how medicine has had a much more pronounced effect on western society than is often acknowledged. As medical knowledge progresses, throwing up new challenges and moral dilemmas, The History of Medicine in Context series offers the opportunity to evaluate the shifting role and practice of medicine from the long perspective, not only providing a better understanding of the past, but often an intriguing perspective on the present.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General