Muscular and Skeletal Anomalies in Human Trisomy in an Evo-Devo Context: Description of a T18 Cyclopic Fetus and Comparison Between Edwards (T18), Patau (T13) and Down (T21) Syndromes Using 3-D Imaging and Anatomical Illustrations, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Muscular and Skeletal Anomalies in Human Trisomy in an Evo-Devo Context

Description of a T18 Cyclopic Fetus and Comparison Between Edwards (T18), Patau (T13) and Down (T21) Syndromes Using 3-D Imaging and Anatomical Illustrations, 1st Edition

By Rui Diogo, Christopher M. Smith, Janine M. Ziermann, Julia Molnar, Marjorie C. Gondre-Lewis, Corinne Sandone, Edward T. Bersu, Mohammed Ashraf Aziz

CRC Press

222 pages | 25 Color Illus. | 130 B/W Illus.

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Description

This book focuses on human anatomy and medicine and specifically on both muscular and skeletal birth defects in humans with trisomy. Moreover, this book also deals with Down syndrome, which is one of the most studied human syndromes and, due to its high incidence and the fact that individuals with this syndrome often live until adulthood, is of special interest to the scientific and medical community.

This new line of inquiry is addressed to a wide audience, including medical researchers, physicians, surgeons, medical and dental students, pathologists, and pediatricians, among others, while also being of interest to developmental and evolutionary biologists, anatomists, functional morphologists, and zoologists.

Table of Contents

Topics and purpose of this book

Introduction

The ontology, phylogeny and clinical importance of muscle variation seen in the light of the myology of human aneuploid syndromes

Table 1 - Examples of muscle variations and their clinical correlations in karyotipically normal humans

Trisomies 18, 13, and 21, cyclopia, and lack of comparative myological studies

Order versus randomness in evolution and birth defects

Serial homology, integration, forelimbs and hindlimbs

Developmental constraints, muscle attachments, facial muscles, and the present study

The musculoskeletal system of a 28-week human Trisomy 18 cyclopia fetus

Introduction

Back, shoulder and arm

Left forearm/hand

Right forearm/hand

Legs and feet

Neck and head, including extraocular muscles

Bones of the cranium

Table 2 - Muscular anomalies in 28-week Trisomy 18 cyclopic fetus compared with documented cases of Trisomies 18, 13, and 21

Comparative anatomy of muscular anomalies of Trisomies 13, 18, and 21

Introduction

Head and neck

Back and pectoral region

Upper limb

Lower Limb

Table 3 - Muscular anomalies reported by other authors in Trisomies 18, 13, and 21

Cyclopia, trisomic anomalies, and order versus chaos in development and evolution

Introduction

Cyclopia and eye musculature

Development, trisomy, cyclopia, and muscles

Integration and limb serial homology

Facial muscles and topological position versus developmental anlage in the cyclopic head

"Logic of monsters", homeostasis, and order versus chaos in development and evolution

Digits and muscles: topology-directed muscle attachment

Introduction

Tetrapod limbs, digits, muscles, and homeotic transformations

Birth defects, limb muscles, non-pentadactyly, and implications for human medicine

Evolutionary theory and mouse models for Down syndrome

Introduction

Evolutionary reversions, Dollo's law, and human evolution

Atavisms, birth defects, "recapitulation", adaptive plasticity and developmental constraints

Future directions: Down syndrome, muscle dysfunction, mouse models, genetics, and apoptosis

Appendix A - Dissection photographs of Trisomy 18 human cyclopia fetus

Appendix B - 3-D renders of Trisomy 18 human cyclopia fetus CT scan data

References

Index

About the Originator

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
MED005000
MEDICAL / Anatomy
MED069000
MEDICAL / Pediatrics
MED085000
MEDICAL / Surgery / General
MED107000
MEDICAL / Genetics