Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework: Writing in Darkness, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework

Writing in Darkness, 1st Edition

By K. Melchor Quick Hall

Routledge

208 pages

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Hardback: 9780367259808
pub: 2019-12-15
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Description

By writing Black feminist texts into the IR canon and naming a common Black feminist praxis, this text charts a path towards a transnational Black feminist (TBF) framework in IR, and outlines why a TBF framework is a much needed intervention in the field.

Situated at the intersection of IR and Black feminist theory and praxis, the book argues that a Black feminist tradition of engaging the international exists, has been neglected by mainstream IR and can be written into the IR canon using the TBF framework. Using grounded theory research within the Black indigenous Garifuna community of Honduras, as well as the scholarship of Black feminist anthropologists, the author illustrates how five TBF guiding principles—intersectionality, solidarity, scholar-activism, attention to borders/boundaries, and radically transparent author positionality—offer a critical alternative for engaging IR studies. The text calls on IR scholars to engage Black feminist scholarship and praxis beyond the written page, through its living legacy.

This interdisciplinary volume will be of interest to feminist scholars, international relations students, and grassroots activists. It will also appeal to students of related disciplines including anthropology, sociology, global studies, development studies and area studies.

Table of Contents

  1. Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework: Calling for an International Relations Intervention
    1. Transnational Black Feminist (TBF) Guiding Principles
      1. Intersectionality
      2. Scholar-Activism
      3. Solidarity
      4. Attention to Borders/Boundaries

    2. One Axis at a Time: Regional, Race, and Gender Scholarship in IR
      1. Global IR, Regional Worlds & Western Exports
      2. Race (Men) in IR

    3. Greater than the Sum of Others’ Parts
    4. Radically Transparent Author Positionality
    5. Conclusion

  2. Honduras’ Ereba Makers: Garifuna Foodways as Grassroots Alternatives to Development
    1. Garifuna Ethnogenesis and Migration
    2. From St. Vincent to Honduras (1797 through 19th Century)
    3. Contemporary (20th and 21st Centuries) Matrifocal Society and the Centrality of Ereba
    4. Gender and Dependency Within and Post-Development
      1. Gender within Development Practice
      2. Dependency Theories
      3. Post-Development

    5. How a TBF Framework Highlights Garifuna Alternatives to Development
      1. Fieldwork with Galpones Casaberos of Iriona
      2. Galpones Organizing Alternatives
      3. TBF Principle #1: Intersectionality
      4. TBF Principle #2: Solidarity
      5. TBF Principle #3: Scholar-Activism
      6. TBF Principle #4: Attention to Borders/Boundaries
      7. TBF Principle #5: Radically Transparent Author Positionality

    6. Conclusion

  3. Understanding Black Women’s Families: The Value of Centering Family in IR Studies
    1. Iriona Family Example #1: Daniel’s Sister-Cousin
    2. Iriona Family Example #2: When I Became Family
    3. Iriona Family Example #3: Host Families & Family Homes
    4. Family Analysis in IR
    5. Black Feminist Conceptualizations of Women
    6. Black Feminist Anthropologists Writing about Black Brazilians
    7. TBF Analysis of Family
      1. TBF Principle #1: Intersectionality
      2. TBF Principle #2: Solidarity
      3. TBF Principle #3: Scholar-Activism
      4. TBF Principle #4: Attention to Borders/Boundaries
      5. TBF Principle #5: Radically Transparent Author Positionality

    8. Conclusion

  4. Honduran Garifuna Nation: A Black Matrifocal Society in a Mestizo Patriarchal State
    1. Racialized and Gendered Hierarchies in the Banana Republic
      1. Anti-Black Legislation and Sentiments
      2. A Woman’s Touch
      3. 1954 Workers’ Strike

    2. Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism
      1. Black and Indigenous Garifuna Organizing

    3. Human Rights Challenges in a State Under Pressure
      1. Garifuna Communities as Tourist Sites
      2. Zelaya’s Ousting, Violent Repression and the Birth of a Resistance Movement

    4. A TBF Analysis of the Black Garifuna Nation in the Mestizo Honduran State
      1. TBF Principle #1: Intersectionality
      2. TBF Principle #2: Solidarity
      3. TBF Principle #3: Scholar-Activism
      4. TBF Principle #4: Attention to Borders/Boundaries
      5. TBF Principle #5: Radically Transparent Author Positionality

    5. Conclusion

  5. Beyond States: Understanding Transnational Indigeneity in Latin America
    1. An International Relations Intervention
    2. Latin American Mestizaje and Blanqueamiento
    3. Feminist Conceptualizations of Nation(alism)
    4. The Garifuna Transnational Community
      1. A History of Garifuna US Migrations
      2. Garifuna Matrifocal Nation
      3. Garifuna Identity and Land Rights

    5. A TBF Analysis of Latin American Transnational Indigeneity
      1. TBF Principle #1: Intersectionality
      2. TBF Principle #2: Solidarity
      3. TBF Principle #3: Scholar-Activism
      4. TBF Principle #4: Attention to Borders/Boundaries
      5. TBF Principle #5: Radically Transparent Author Positionality

    6. Conclusion

  6. Conclusion: Opportunities for Transnational Solidarity
    1. From International Relations to Transnational Feminist Frameworks
    2. Building Solidarity
    3. Radical Reproductive Justice
    4. Learning from Garifuna Land Struggles and the Food Sovereignty Movement
    5. A TBF Analysis of Transnational Solidarity
      1. TBF Principle #1: Intersectionality
      2. TBF Principle #2: Solidarity
      3. TBF Principle #3: Scholar-Activism
      4. TBF Principle #4: Attention to Borders/Boundaries
      5. TBF Principle #5: Radically Transparent Author Positionality

    6. Conclusion

About the Author

K. Melchor Quick Hall is a faculty member in Fielding Graduate University’s School of Leadership Studies, USA. Interested in transnational feminist and grassroots work that advances liberation struggles, she is also a member of a Solidarity Collective that is working to strengthen relationships between grassroots organizations in the US and Latin America.

About the Series

Worlding Beyond the West

Historically, the International Relations (IR) discipline has established its boundaries, issues, and theories based upon Western experience and traditions of thought. This series explores the role of geocultural factors, institutions, and academic practices in creating the concepts, epistemologies, and methodologies through which IR knowledge is produced. This entails identifying alternatives for thinking about the "international" that are more in tune with local concerns and traditions outside the West. But it also implies provincializing Western IR and empirically studying the practice of producing IR knowledge at multiple sites within the so-called ‘West’.

We welcome book proposals in areas such as:

  • Critiques of Western-centric scholarship and policy-making.
  • The emergence of new theories and approaches from ‘the periphery’.
  • The challenges for the discipline at large in accommodating its post-Western phase, and the political and ethical dilemmas involved in this.
  • Concrete studies of the results of approaching issues and agendas in ‘the periphery’ with the tools offered by core thinking.
  • Work by scholars from the non-West about local, national, regional or global issues, reflecting on the importance of different perspectives and of geocultural epistemologies.
  • Studies of ‘travelling theory’ – how approaches, concepts and theories get modified, re-casted and translated in different contexts.
  • The meaning and evolution of major concepts in particular regions, such as security thinking, concepts of globalisation and power, understandings of ‘economy’ and ‘development’ or other key categories in particular regions.
  • The sociology of the discipline in different places – with a focus on a country, a region, on specific research communities/schools, subfields, or on specific institutions such as academic associations, journals, foundations or think tanks.
  • Empirical studies of epistemic practices and the conditions of knowledge production in different Western and non-Western locales and sites.
  • Studies of the interaction between different knowledge producers, such as processes of expertise or the dialogue between intellectuals, academics, bureaucrats and policy elites.

Series Editors: Arlene B. Tickner, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia, David Blaney, Macalester College, USA and Inanna Hamati-Ataya, University of Cambridge, UK

Founding Editor: Ole Wæver, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POL000000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / General