Nietzsche’s Philosophy of Education: Rethinking Ethics, Equality and the Good Life in a Democratic Age, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Nietzsche’s Philosophy of Education

Rethinking Ethics, Equality and the Good Life in a Democratic Age, 1st Edition

By Mark E. Jonas, Douglas W. Yacek

Routledge

196 pages

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pub: 2018-07-26
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Description

Nietzsche’s Philosophy of Education makes the case that Nietzsche’s ​philosophy has ​significant import for the theory and contemporary practice of education, arguing that ​some of ​Nietzsche​'s most important ​ideas ​have been misunderstood by ​previous ​interpreters. ​In ​providing novel reinterpretations of ​Nietzsche's ​ethical theory, political​ philosophy​ and philosophical anthropology ​and outlining concrete ways in which ​these ideas can enrich teaching and learning in modern democratic schools, the book sets itself apart​ from previous works on Nietzsche​. This is one of the first ​extended engagements with Nietzsche’s philosophy ​which attempts to determine his true legacy for democratic education.

​In its engagement with both the vast secondary literature on Nietzsche's philosophy and the educational implications of his philosophical vision, this book makes a unique contribution to both the philosophy of education and Nietzsche scholarship. In addition, its ​development of four concrete pedagogi​cal approaches from Nietzsche's educational ideas ​makes the book a potentially helpful guide to meeting the practical challenges of ​contemporary teaching.

This book will be of great interest to Nietzsche scholars, researchers in the philosophy of education and ​​students studying educational foundations.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Nietzsche’s Educational Legacy

1: The Doctrine of Perspectivism

2: Educational Implications of Perspectivism: Empathizing with the Other

3: The Doctrine of Self-overcoming

4: Educational Implications of Self-overcoming: Embodying Reason, Embracing Struggle

5: The Doctrine of the Order of Rank

6: Educational Implications of the Order of Rank: Creating a Culture of Emulation

7: The Doctrine of Ressentiment

8: Educational Implications of Ressentiment: Cultivating a Disposition of Gratitude

9: Conclusion: Nietzsche’s Pedagogical Vision for the Good Life

About the Authors

Mark E. Jonas is Associate Professor of Education and Associate Professor of Philosophy (by courtesy) at Wheaton College in Illinois.

Douglas W. Yacek is Research Fellow and Lecturer in the Leibniz School of Education and the Institute for Special Education in the Faculty of Philosophy at the Leibniz University Hannover in Germany.

About the Series

New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

This book series is devoted to the exploration of new directions in the philosophy of education. After the linguistic turn, the cultural turn, and the historical turn, where might we go? Does the future promise a digital turn with a greater return to connectionism, biology and biopolitics based on new understandings of system theory and knowledge ecologies? Does it foreshadow a genuinely alternative radical global turn based on a new openness and interconnectedness? Does it leave humanism behind or will it reengage with the question of the human in new and unprecedented ways? How should philosophy of education reflect new forces of globalization? How can it become less Anglo-centric and develop a greater sensitivity to other traditions, languages, and forms of thinking and writing, including those that are not routed in the canon of Western philosophy but in other traditions that share the ‘love of wisdom’ that characterizes the wide diversity within Western philosophy itself. Can this be done through a turn to intercultural philosophy? To indigenous forms of philosophy and philosophizing? Does it need a post-Wittgensteinian philosophy of education? A postpostmodern philosophy? Or should it perhaps leave the whole construction of 'post'-positions behind?

In addition to the question of the intellectual resources for the future of philosophy of education, what are the issues and concerns that philosophers of education should engage with? How should they position themselves? What is their specific contribution? What kind of intellectual and strategic alliances should they pursue? Should philosophy of education become more global, and if so, what would the shape of that be? Should it become more cosmopolitan or perhaps more decentred? Perhaps most importantly in the digital age, the time of the global knowledge economy that reprofiles education as privatized human capital and simultaneously in terms of an historic openness, is there a philosophy of education that grows out of education itself, out of the concerns for new forms of teaching, studying, learning and speaking that can provide comment on ethical and epistemological configurations of economics and politics of knowledge? Can and should this imply a reconnection with questions of democracy and justice?

This series comprises texts that explore, identify and articulate new directions in the philosophy of education. It aims to build bridges, both geographically and temporally: bridges across different traditions and practices and bridges towards a different future for philosophy of education.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
EDU000000
EDUCATION / General