Nineteenth Century British Women's Education, 1840-1900 v6 : Arguments and Experiences book cover
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Nineteenth Century British Women's Education, 1840-1900 v6
Arguments and Experiences



ISBN 9781003061014
Published November 24, 2020 by Routledge
462 Pages

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Book Description

Nineteenth Century British Women's Education brings together key documents in the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls’ and women’s education. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets and reviews, this collection gives researchers access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls’ and women’s education and women’s work as educators.





The collection is divided overall into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls’ and women’s education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. In examining the campaign to establish higher education for women, the first volumes include the writings of such primary figures as Emily Davies, Lydia Becker, Barbara Bodichon, Jessie Boucherett, Josephine Butler, Frances Power Cobbe, Millicent Garrett Fawcett, Maria Grey and Emily Shirreff in addition to illustrating the significance of institutions such as Girton and Newnham Colleges. Later volumes document women's work as educators, and include writings by Mary Carpenter, Dorothea Beale, Frances Mary Buss, and the Shirreff sisters Maria and Emily, gifted educators of girls at the elementary and secondary levels, and women whose educational practice embodied the arguments they made on behalf of girls’ education. These volumes also chart the importance of the Governesses’ Benevolent Institution, the Schools Inquiry Commission and the Journal of Women’s Education Union in charting the increasing organization and professionalization of women teachers.



Edited and with new introductions by Susan Hamilton and Janice Schroeder, Nineteenth Century British Women's Education is destined to be an invaluable reference resource to all future scholars of feminism and the history of education.

Table of Contents

VOLUME VI - Women as Educators: Arguments and Experiences -- PART 1 Teaching as a Profession for Women -- 110. ‘Hints on the Modern Governess System’, Fraser’s Magazine, 30, (1844), pp. 571-83. -- 111. ‘On the Social Position of Governesses’, Fraser’s Magazine, 37, (1848), pp. 411-14. /SARAH LEWIS -- 112. ‘Going a Governessing’, English Woman’s Journal, 1, (1858), pp. 396-404. -- 113. ‘The Profession of the Teacher: The Annual Reports of the Governesses’ Benevolent Institution, from 1843 to 1856’, English Woman’s Journal, 1, (1858), pp. 1-13. /BESSIE RAYNER PARKES -- 114. Remarks on the Education of Girls, 3rd edn, (London: Chapman, 1856), pp. 5-24. /BESSIE RAYNER PARKES -- 115. ‘Women as Educators’, English Journal of Education, 11, (1857), pp. 258-62. -- 116. ‘Project for Young Ladies as Schoolmistresses’, English Journal of Education, 12, (1858), pp. 148-52. /ANGELA BURDETT COUTTS -- 117. ‘The London Association of Schoolmistresses’, Englishwoman’s Review, 2, (1868), pp. 9-12. -- 118. ‘Education Considered as a Profession for Women’, Woman’s Work and Woman’s Culture, Josephine Butler (Ed.), (London: Macmillan, 1869), pp. 49-77. /GEORGE BUTLER -- 119. ‘Work for Ladies in Elementary Schools’, (London: Longmans, 1872), pp. 1-26. /LOUISA M. HUBBARD -- 120. ‘Elementary Teaching, A Profession for Ladies’, National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, (1873), pp. 370-78. /LOUISA M. HUBBARD -- PART 2 Children’s Education -- 121. ‘On Girls’ Industrial Training’, National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, (1859), pp. 366-76. /J.P. NORRIS -- 122. ‘On the Training and Supervision of Workhouse Girls’, National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, (1859), pp. 696-702. /LOUISA TWINING -- 123. ‘Home and school education’, Contemporary Review, 3, (1866), pp. 220-36. /W.E. JELF -- 124. ‘Middle Class Schools for Girls’, Englishwoman’s Review, 1, (1867), pp. 285-88. -- 125. ‘Technical Education of Girls’, Englishwoman’s Review, 2, (1868), pp. 1-9. -- 126. ‘A Few Thoughts Upon the Education of Girls’, Victoria Magazine, 14, (1869), pp. 1-11. -- 127. The English Girl’s Education’, Contemporary Review, 14,(1870), pp. 29-41. /MENELLA B. SMEDLEY -- 128. ‘Workhouse schools for girls’, Macmillan’s Magazine, 31, (1874), pp. 27-36. /MENELLA B. SMEDLEY -- 129. ‘A Woman’s View of Compulsory Education’, Victoria Magazine, 16, (1871), pp. 271-75. /J.C. AYRTON -- 130. ‘The Establishment of Girls’ Public Middle Class Schools’, Englishwoman’s Review, 5, (1872), pp. 5-17. /MARY GURNEY -- 131. A Few Words to the Mothers of Little Children, (London: Hatchards, Piccadilly, 1880), pp. 5-29. /LOUISA M. HUBBARD -- 132. ‘The Other Side of the Question’, Macmillan’s Magazine, 43, (1881), pp. 461-64. /FRANCES MARTIN -- 133. ‘The Education of Children’, Macmillan’s Magazine, 61, (1890), pp. 186-92. /MRS. CHRISTOPHER G. B. CORBETT -- 134. ‘On the Education of Girls’, Macmillan’s Magazine, 68, (1893), pp. 33-37. /EMILY C. COOK -- 135. ‘A Village School’, Macmillan’s Magazine, 71, (1895), pp. 455-61. /MRS. EDWARD CARTWRIGHT -- 136. ‘Resident Schools and Boarding Houses’, Public Schools for Girls: A Series of Papers on Their History, Aims, and Schemes of Study, Sara A. Burstall and M.A. Douglas (Eds), (London: Longmans, 1911), pp. 226-44. /MARGARET ROBERTSON -- PART 3 Mary Carpenter -- 137. ‘The Girls’, Juvenile Delinquents: Their Condition and Treatment, (Montclair, N.J.: Patterson Smith, 1970 (1853)), pp. 81-117. /MARY CARPENTER -- 138. ‘An Address Read at the Conference on Ragged Schools’, (Birmingham: Benjamin Hall, 1861), pp. 3-10. /MARY CARPENTER -- 139. ‘On the Education of Pauper Girls’, English Woman’s Journal, 9, (1862), pp. 321-8. /MARY CARPENTER -- 140. ‘On Female Education in India’, National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, (1867), pp. 405-18. /MARY CARPENTER -- 141. ‘Female Education’, National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, (1869), pp. 351-64. /MARY CARPENTER, DOROTHEA BEALE AND WHATELY COOKE TAYLOR -- PART 4 Sara Burstall -- 142. ‘The Aim of Girls’ Education’, English High Schools for Girls, (London: Longmans, 1907), pp. 1-15. /SARA BURSTALL -- 143. ‘Rise and Development of Public Secondary Schools for Girls, 1850-1910’, Public Schools for Girls: A Series of Papers on Their History, Aims, and Schemes of Study, Sara A. Burstall and M.A. Douglas (Eds), (London: Longmans, 1911), pp. 1-21. /SARA BURSTALL.

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Editor(s)

Biography

Susan Hamilton (Edited by) ,  Janice Schroeder (Edited by)