Rewriting Peter as an Intertextual Character in the Canonical Gospels: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Rewriting Peter as an Intertextual Character in the Canonical Gospels

1st Edition

By Finn Damgaard

Routledge

154 pages

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Description

Peter is a fascinating character in all four canonical gospels, not only as a literary figure in each of the gospels respectively, but also when looked at from an intertextual perspective. This book examines how Peter is rewritten for each of the gospels, positing that the different portrayals of this crucial figure reflect not only the theological priorities of each gospel author, but also their attitude towards their predecessors. Rewriting Peter as an Intertextual Character in the Canonical Gospels is the first critical study of the canonical gospels which is based on Markan priority, Luke’s use of Mark and Matthew, and John’s use of all three synoptic gospels. Through a selection of close readings, Damgaard both provides a new critical portrait of Peter and proposes a new theory of source and redaction in the gospels.

In the last thirty years there has been an increasing appreciation of the gospels’ literary design and of the gospel writers as authors and innovators rather than merely compilers and transmitters. However, literary critics have tended to read each gospel individually as if they were written for isolated communities. This book reconsiders the relationship between the gospels, arguing that the works were composed for a general audience and that the writers were bold and creative interpreters of the tradition they inherited from earlier gospel sources. Damgaard’s view that the gospel authors were familiar with the work of their predecessors, and that the divergences between their narratives were deliberate, sheds new light on their intentions and has a tremendous impact on our understanding of the gospels.

Table of Contents

Introduction

The power of differences

Survey of scholarship

Intertextuality, intertextual intensity and irony

Outline of chapters

Chapter 1: Rewriting a Paradigmatic Apostolic Portrayal: The Figure of Peter in the Gospel of Mark

1.1 Introduction: In the shadow of Paul

1.2 Previous research on the figure of Peter in the Gospel of Mark

1.3 Reading the Gospel of Mark on the basis of Papias’ note

1.4 The figure of Peter in the Gospel of Mark

1.5 The Gospel of Mark and the figure of Peter in the letters of Paul

1.5.1 The figure of Peter in the letters of Paul

1.5.2 Encountering Peter: Galatians 1:18-2:21

1.5.3 Parity and superiority: 1 Corinthians 9:1-27 and 15:1-11

1.5.4 Peter, Paul and Mark

1.6 Paul’s self-portrayal as a persecutor of the church and later developments of this portrait

1.7 A parallel between Mark’s portrayal of Peter and Paul’s biography of reversal?

1.8 Conclusion: In the footsteps of Paul

Chapter 2: Alienating Peter: The Figure of Peter in the Gospel of Matthew

2.1 Introduction: Superseding the Gospel of Mark

2.2 Previous research on the figure of Peter in the Gospel of Matthew

2.3 Matthew’s rewriting of Mark’s portrayal of Peter

2.3.1 Matthew’s loss of memory

2.3.2 Peter and the marks of fallibility

2.3.3 Flesh, blood and irony

2.3.4 The stumbling stone

2.4 Conclusion: Peter the battlefield

Chapter 3: Rehabilitating Peter: The Figure of Peter in the Gospel of Luke

3.1 Introduction: The author of Luke-Acts, his predecessors and the question of order

3.2 Previous research on the figure of Peter in Luke

3.3 Rewriting Matthew’s and Mark’s portrayal of Peter

3.4 Rehabilitating Peter: Rewriting Matthew’s portrayal of Peter

3.4.1 Introduction: The figure of Peter in Matthew’s substantive additions to Mark

3.4.2 Luke 5:1-11 as a counter narrative to Matt 14:22-33?

3.4.3 On Peter’s brother, Andrew

3.4.4 A perfect confession

3.4.5 “He went out and wept bitterly” (Matt 26:75 and Luke 22:62)

3.5 Remembering and repentance: Rewriting Mark’s portrayal of Peter

3.5.1 Introduction: The potential of Mark

3.5.2 The function of Luke’s denial scene

3.6 Conclusion: Outbidding Matthew and Mark

Chapter 4: Reinventing a Paradigmatic Disciple: The Figure of Peter in the Gospel of John

4.1 Introduction: John 1-21 and the synoptic gospels

4.2 Previous research on the figure of Peter in John

4.3 Rewriting the synoptic portrayals of Peter

4.4 Reinventing a paradigmatic disciple: Mark’s portrayal of Peter rewritten

4.4.1 Peter and the Beloved Disciple

4.4.2 Scattering and following

4.4.3 Shepherding the sheep: Peter and John 21

4.5 “He was speaking of Judas” (John 6:71): Matthew’s portrayal of Peter rewritten

4.5.1. Introduction: Matthew and John

4.5.2 Peter, Judas and the devil

4.6 Fisherman or shepherd?: Luke’s portrayal of Peter rewritten

4.6.1 The run to the empty tomb and John’s dependence on Luke

4.6.2 The fishing trip

4.7 Conclusion: Replacing the synoptic gospels

Conclusion

Summary

Rewritten Bible and the canonical gospels

Dialogicity vs referentiality

Appendix: References to the Figure of Peter in the Letters of Paul and the Canonical Gospels and Parallel Texts

About the Author

Finn Damgaard was a postdoctoral researcher in the Biblical Studies Department of the Faculty of Theology at the University of Copenhagen. He is now a minister in the Danish Church. He is also the author of Recasting Moses (2013).

About the Series

Copenhagen International Seminar

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS002000
HISTORY / Ancient / General