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Shakespeare in the Victorian Periodicals





ISBN 9780415808576
Published December 15, 2011 by Routledge
180 Pages

 
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Book Description

Based on extensive archival research, Shakespeare in the Victorian Periodicals offers an entirely new perspective on popular Shakespeare reception by focusing on articles published in Victorian periodicals. Shakespeare had already reached the apex of British culture in the previous century, becoming the national poet of the middle and upper classes, but during the Victorian era he was embraced by more marginal groups. If Shakespeare was sometimes employed as an instrument of enculturation, imposed on these groups, he was also used by them to resist this cultural hegemony.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction: The Nineteenth-Century Popular Press and Shakespeare Reception History

Chapter One: Making Shakespeare Readers in the Early Working Class Press

Chapter Two: Shakespeare for Manly Boys and Marriageable Girls

Chapter Three: Character Criticism and its Discontents in Periodicals for Women

Chapter Four: The Theatres Regulation Act and the Great Exhibition in the Theatrical Journal

Chapter Five: Victorian Periodicals and England’s National Theatre Debate

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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Reviews

"Prince's book opens up an important and little-investigated terrain for Shakespeare reception studies and demonstrates the key role of periodicals in Shakespeare's wider dissemination during the nineteenth century. It is a useful addition to the existing Shakespeare literature that will be of interest to scholars of Victorian literature, cultural studies, and theatrical history." --Shakespeare Quarterly

"Kathryn Price's Shakespeare in the Victorian Periodicals is a needed addition to nineteenth-century studies... an engaging and well-researched introduction to the topic, and we can look forward to future studies that take up the threads of this discussion." --Victorian Periodicals Review