Social Memory as a Force for Social and Economic Transformation  book cover
1st Edition

Social Memory as a Force for Social and Economic Transformation

Edited By

Muxe Nkondo



  • Available for pre-order. Item will ship after March 3, 2023
ISBN 9781032434445
March 3, 2023 Forthcoming by Routledge
360 Pages 38 B/W Illustrations

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Book Description

This volume of essays is a reflection on social memory as a force for social and economic transformation.

Written by scholars and organic intellectuals, it focuses on the uses of social memory, in particular the conflict between the legacies of colonialism and the movement for fundamental change. The content addresses both experts and ordinary citizens alike, with a view to advancing discourse on where we are right now, and how we move on from here to achieve meaningful transformation. As scholars and public representatives with a deep understanding of the social, economic and political dynamics of modern history of South Africa, the contributors offer their unique perspectives and reflections on history, politics, economics, culture, education, ethics and the arts, as well as the links that bind these aspects into an ecology of ideas and attitudes.

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

FOREWORD Cyril Ramaphosa

FOREWORD Nathi Mthethwa

PREFACE MCR Makopo

PREFACE Jane Mufamadi

INTRODUCTION Muxe Nkondo

1. CONTRADICTIONS IN MEMORIALISING LIBERATION HISTORY

Albie Sachs

2. MEMORIALISATION AS A FORCE FOR RADICAL TRANSFORMATION: THE CASE OF FREEDOM PARK IN SOUTH AFRICA 11

Mandla S. Makhanya

3. FREEDOM PARK AS A PLACE OF MEMORY: SYMBOLIC REPARATIONS, INDIGENOUS AFRICAN KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS AND RECONCILIATION

Jane Mufamadi

4. MEMORY AND SOCIOECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION IN SOUTH AFRICA

Vusi Gumede

5. HOMELAND MANIFESTATIONS—A POSTAPARTHEID DENIGRATION OF SOCIAL COHESION

Modimowabarwa Kanyane

6. THE HISTORICAL TRANSFORMATION OF MALE INITIATION POLITICALCULTURAL PRACTICES AND ITS ROLE IN NATION-BUILDING: THE CASE OF THE WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

Mthobeli Guma

7. MEMORY, KNOWLEDGE AND FREEDOM: FROM DISMEMBERMENT AND RE-MEMBERING

Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni

8. MEMORY FOR PEACE IN WAR: A CASE OF REMEMBERING AND REBUILDING POSTAPARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA

9. MENDING OUR WOUNDED SOULS: TOWARDS THE POSSIBILITY OF HEALING AND SOCIAL COHESION

Puleng Segalo

10. RECONCILIATION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN SOUTH AFRICA: STILL THE UNFINISHED BUSINESS OF THE TRC?

Tembeka Ngcebetsha-Mooij

11. RISING VIOLENCE: THE CRISIS OF BROKEN INDIVIDUALS

William Gumede

CHAPTER 12 SOCIAL MEMORY THROUGH POSTHUMOUS REMEMBRANCE

Moeketsi Letseka

13. MEMORIALISING THE COMMUNITY PUBLIC HEALTH LEGACY OF THE RIBEIROS

Olga Makhubela-Nkondo

14. THE PLACE OF MEMORY IN THE LIFE AND WORK OF DESMOND TUTU

Tinyiko Maluleke

15. MEMORIALISING THE UNTOLD STORIES OF WOMEN, FOR TRANSFORMATION

Thenjiwe Mtintso

16. ON AND OF MEMORIES: UNDERSTANDING WOMEN’S STORIES, STITCHED PERCEPTIONS AND THE RUPTURE OF VIOLENCE IN THEIR LIVES

Thenjiwe Meyiwa

17. MEMORIES OF, AND REFLECTIONS ON, BROADCASTING IN SOUTH AFRICA

Marcia Socikwa

18. PRESS FREEDOM 25 YEARS POSTINDEPENDENCE: CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS FOR THE SOUTH AFRICAN MODEL

Lauren Marx

19. UNIVERSITIES OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FOR RURAL DEVELOPMENT AS FREEDOM AND JUSTICE: THE POLITICS OF EVIDENCE AND DECISION

Muxe Nkondo

20. THE CENTRE, THE PERIPHERY AND SELFHOOD: RETHINKING THE ROLE OF AFRICAN LANGUAGES FOR RADICAL TRANSFORMATION

Tlhabane Mokhine Motaung

21. MEMORIALISING THE PAN-AFRICANIST CONGRESS OF AZANIA

Molefe Ike Mafole

22. TO SING OR NOT TO SING: THE PROTEST SONG IN SOUTH AFRICA TODAY

Vuyisile Msila

23. SHARED DREAMS: CREATIVE ART—FROM COLLECTIVE MEMORY TO SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION

Judy Seidman

24. (SOCIAL) ANCHOR AS OPPOSITE TO TUMBLEWEED: THE NAMING OF "THINGS" AS MEMORY AND ANCHOR, REPRESSION AS EROSION AND DISLOCATION

Wiseman Magasela

25. MEMORIALISING FREEDOM DURING COVID-19 LOCKDOWN IN SOUTH AFRICA

Tembeka Ngcebetsha-Mooij

26. THE POLITICAL ECONOMY AND ETHICS OF GLOBAL SOLIDARITY IN COVID-19

Muxe Nkondo

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

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Editor(s)

Biography

Muxe Nkondo, formerly Andrew Mellon Fellow in English and Visiting Professor at Harvard University, Visiting Scholar at Oxford University, Visiting Professor at Northwestern University, Chicago; one of 500 intellectuals from Africa and the diaspora, invited, in 2004, by the African Union to advise it on policy and related issues. Currently, he is a member of Council of the University of South Africa, and Chairperson of the Rixaka Forum and Collins Chabane Foundation. He has written extensively on the political economy of knowledge, language, culture and fundamental change, with a focus on South Africa.