Standardization as Sociolinguistic Change: A Transversal Study of Three Traditional Dialect Areas, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Standardization as Sociolinguistic Change

A Transversal Study of Three Traditional Dialect Areas, 1st Edition

Edited by Marie Maegaard, Malene Monka, Kristine Køhler Mortensen, Andreas Candefors Stæhr

Routledge

288 pages | 24 B/W Illus.

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Hardback: 9781138606852
pub: 2019-11-15
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Description

This volume seeks to extend and expand our current understanding of the processes of language standardization, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative approaches to examine how linguistic variation plays out in various ways in everyday life in Denmark. The book compares linguistic variation across three different rural speech communities, underpinned by a transversal framework, which draws upon different methodological and analytical approaches, as well as data from different contexts across different generations, and results in a nuanced and dynamic portrait of language change in one region over time. Examining communities with varying degrees of linguistic variation with this multi-layered framework demonstrates a broader need to re-examine perceptions of language standardization as a unidirectional process, but rather as one shaped by a range of factors at the local level, including language ideologies and mediatization. A concluding chapter by eminent sociolinguist David Britain brings together the conclusions drawn from the preceding chapters and reinforces their wider implications within the field of sociolinguistics. Offering new insights into language standardization and language change, this book will be of particular interest to students and scholars in sociolinguistics, dialectology, and linguistic anthropology.

Table of Contents

Table of contents

 

Acknowledgements

CHAPTER 1: Introduction: Standardization as Sociolinguistic Change (Marie Maegaard)

CHAPTER 2: Patterns of Dialect Use: Language Standardization at Different Rates (Marie Maegaard and Malene Monka)

CHAPTER 3: Southern Jutland: Language Ideology as a Means to Slow Down Standardization (Malene Monka)

CHAPTER 4: Northern Jutland: Local Positioning and Global Orientation (Kristine Køhler Mortensen)

CHAPTER 5: Bornholm: the Terminal Stage of Dedialectalization (Andreas Candefors Stæhr and Anne Larsen)

CHAPTER 6: Perception, Recognition and Indexicality: Experimental Investigations of Variation in Northern Jutland, Southern Jutland and on Bornholm (Marie Maegaard and Pia Quist)

Chapter 7: Dialect in the Media: Mediatization and Processes of Standardization (Andreas Candefors Stæhr, Malene Monka, Pia Quist and Anne Larsen)

CHAPTER 8: Language Ideologies: a Key to Understanding Language Standardization (Jann Scheuer, Anne Larsen, Marie Maegaard, Malene Monka and Kristine Køhler Mortensen)

CHAPTER 9: Transversal Perspectives on Standardization as Sociolinguistic Change (Marie Maegaard, Malene Monka, Kristine Køhler Mortensen and Andreas Candefors Stæhr)

CHAPTER 10: Denmark: a perhaps unexpected dialect laboratory (David Britain)

About the Editors

Marie Maegaard is Associate Professor in the Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Malene Monka is a Postdoc in the Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Kristine Køhler Mortensen is a Postdoc in the Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Andreas Candefors Stæhr is a Postdoc in the Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

About the Series

Routledge Studies in Language Change

This series provides a venue for quantitative research investigating the social underpinnings of language change. It gives a platform to research that is firmly rooted in the speech community, yet abstracts to a level of generalization, resulting in theoretical insights that advance our understanding of change as it percolates through the community and within the individual. The series showcases studies of longitudinal and shorter term patterns of language change from a wealth of communities. Volumes in the series rely on a multitude of epistemological frameworks, including but not restricted to: social identity theory, network theory, models of language change, child language acquisition, multilingualism, language contact, language diffusion, and language shift. Interdisciplinary work is encouraged, especially that which explores the interfaces of sociolinguistics with neighboring disciplines such as formal linguistics, history, human geography, literature or anthropology. The scope of the series covers classic research monographs as well as edited collections of papers that are integrated around a coherent central theme.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
LAN009000
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General