The Company Democracy Model : Creating Innovative Democratic Work Cultures for Effective Organizational Knowledge-Based Management and Leadership book cover
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The Company Democracy Model
Creating Innovative Democratic Work Cultures for Effective Organizational Knowledge-Based Management and Leadership




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ISBN 9780367745622
November 23, 2021 Forthcoming by Productivity Press
424 Pages 149 B/W Illustrations

 
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Book Description

Company democracy is often misunderstood in the business context as democracy is normally related to politics. In this book, the authors present a different dimension in which they focus first on employees and their work context and then give them new possibilities to understand democracy from the company floor level. The Company Democracy Model (CDM) is an industry-wide, practical standard for knowledge management utilization under applied philosophical thinking. CDM is based on the wisdom of the ancient-Hellenic Delphic maxims, primarily on "Gnothi seauton: Know thyself," "Metron Ariston: Moderation is best" and "Miden Agan: Nothing in excess." The model is executed through a framework in which an organizational evolutionary spiral method is used for the creation of knowledge-based democratic cultures for effective organizational knowledge-based management and leadership. Through this new innovative methodology with methods, we can gain/create many ideas, insights, innovations, new products, and services to benefit the company in many ways. The model starts from the epistemological, ontological, and metaphorical structure to facilitate the creation of a strong conceptual framework as the theoretical basis for a corporate strategy that promotes the continuous, sustainable, democratic improvement of the company based on its intellectual capital, knowledge, and innovation. Furthermore, the model is used to facilitate the finding of analogies for the clarification of differences between and emphasizes the importance of capital-related and human-related business issues in the formation of company innovation development, profitability, productivity, performance, and added value. The model uses this metaphorical basic structure to generate a practical framework of how to develop a strong dynamic, democratic, and co-evolutionary organizational culture inside the company to serve continuous knowledge-based business development. The result of all the described activities is to give the readers new ideas on how to develop, manage, and lead a company in a collective, modern democratic manner. Essentially, the Company Democracy Model (CDM) can be used in companies, organizations, and different governmental bodies as a live knowledge elicitation engine in which ideas are continuously presented from all types of employees regardless of their rank. Once employees feel that there is something that can optimize the company/organization operations better, they are free to express themselves openly and democratically to the company/organization. This is an on-going process and a culture -- not a program. Knowledge-based organizational cultures under the Company Democracy model ignite corporate innovation and corporate entrepreneurship adding to the company’s competitiveness. Employees are free to present knowledge and ideas and receive the support needed to develop them furthermore. Therefore, an employee with one simple idea can end running a product line based on that idea, manage a spin-off company, or get promoted according to the success. The model can be adopted in many ways within an organization, such as: • Horizontal (directly across and throughout the entire organization), • Vertically (in a selected department, division, or business sector of the organization), • Pilot (in a selected group of people only, primarily for acquaintance or trial purposes). The overall, gradual, tiered, or targeted adaptation of the model requires a limited commitment to financial resources, manpower, and corporate operations to generate the benefits but also to support a subsequent expansion of the model is other strategic business areas across the organization.

Table of Contents

Dedication

Acknowledgments

LIST OF FIGURES

LIST OF TABLES

PREFACE

Book Stucture

Section 1. Applied Philosophy.

CHAPTER 1.

Science and Theory Precede Practice : A Scientific Framework for the Applied Philosophy Approach in Management and Leadership

1.1 INTRODUCTION

1.2. CREATION OF THE SCIENTIFIC FRAMEWORK

1.2.1     Scientific Background ('Episteme')

1.2.2     Theoretical Background ('Sophia')

1.2.3     Technological Background ('Techne')

1.2.4    Practical Background ('Phronesis')

1.3. BACKGROUND PHILOSOPHY

1.4 THE DELPHIC MAXIMS AND THE CIRCLES OF MIND

1.5. APPLIED SYSTEMS SCIENCE

1.6. THE COMPILED METHODS WITH APPLIED PHILOSOPHY

1.7 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 2.

Delphic Maxims' Ontology-Based Taxonomies for Applied Philosophy: An Interpretation of the Ancient Hellenic Philosophy in Business and Governance Management.

2.1. INTRODUCTION

2.2. Analyzing the Delphic Maxims

2.3. Ontologies, Taxonomies, and Classes

2.4. ONTOLOGIES, TAXONOMIES, AND CLASSES OF THE DELPHIC MAXIMS

2.4.1 Ontologies

2.4.2 Taxonomies

2.4.3 Classes

2.4.4. A Triadic Classification of Knowledge

2.4.5. Business Management and Leadership Relationships

2.5. Beyond the Delphic Maxims

2.6. SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

THE 147 DELPHIC MAXIMS

REFERENCES

Chapter 3.

Visualization of the Wisdom Cube: Wisdom Space for Management and Leadership

3.1 FROM PYTHAGORAS TO SOCRATES, PLATO, AND ARISTOTLE

3.2 THE DIMENSIONS OF WISDOM

3.2.1 Episteme - the Scientific Dimension of Wisdom

3.2.2 Sophia – the Theoretical Dimension of Wisdom

3.2.3 Techne – the Technical Dimension of Wisdom

3.2.4 Phronesis – the Practical Dimension of Wisdom

3.3 THE PLANES OF WISDOM

3.3.1 The Plane of Scientific and Theoretical Wisdom

3.3.2 The Plane of Theoretical and Technical Wisdom

3.3.3 The Plane of Scientific and Technical Wisdom

3.4 THE SPACE OF WISDOM

3.5 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 4.

The Company Democracy Culture: Understanding Culture and Dynamics

4.1. INTRODUCTION

4.2. THE COMPANY DEMOCRACY CULTURE SYSTEM AND SUB-SYSTEMS

4.2.1 Information and Communication Sub-System

4.2.2 Command and Control Sub-System

4.2.3 Operation and Production Sub-system

4.2.4 Maintenance and Support Sub-system

4.3. DEMOCRATIC COMPANY CULTURE ONTOLOGY STRUCTURE, SPACE, AND DYNAMICS

4.3.1 Structure of the Company Democracy Culture Ontology

4.3.2 The Space and Dynamics of the Company Democracy Culture Ontology

4.4 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 5.

Dimensions in Company Performance: The Power of Co-Evolution

5.1. THE HUMAN INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL PARADOX

5.2. CO-EVOLUTION IN HUMAN PERFORMANCE

5.3. CO-EVOLUTION IN BUSINESS PERFORMANCE

5.4 CO-EVOLUTION IN COLLECTIVE PERFORMANCE

5.5 THE POWER OF CO-EVOLUTION

5.6 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

 

Chapter 6.

Managing and Leading Democratically: Achieving Democratic Balance

6.1 THE MANAGEMENT WINDSHIELD

6.2. TIME ONTOLOGY

6.3. THE LEADERSHIP ONTOLOGY

6.3.1 Purpose of Leadership

6.3.2 Leadership Focus

6.3.3 Leadership Styles

6.3.4 Leadership Activities

6.4 THE MANAGEMENT ONTOLOGY

6.4.1 Purpose of Management

6.4.2 Management Focus

6.4.3 Management Work Styles

6.4.4 Management Activities

6.5 MANAGEMENT WINDSHIELD: THE COMBINED ONTOLOGY

6.6 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

 

Section 2. Human Focus in Living Systems

Chapter 7.

The Holistic Concept of Man in the Business Environment: The Concepts We Live By

7.1 INTRODUCTION

7.2 know yourself - Opening the human mind

7.3 THE Holistic Concept of Man Metaphor

7.4 BASIC Steps to The Company Democracy Culture

7.5 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 8.

The Circles of Mind Metaphor: Actors on the Stage of Consciousness

8.1 INTRODUCTION

8.2 The workspace of the mind

8.3 The Structure of the Circles of Mind Metaphor

8.4 The Usage of the Circles of Mind Metaphor

8.5 Improving Your Mastery

8.6 EMPHASIS ON WORKING PEOPLE FOR ORGANIZATIONAL AND SOCIETAL SHARED ADDED-VALUE

8.7 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 9.

Harnessing Modern Knowledge Systems: Applying Knowledge Frameworks

9.1 INTRODUCTION

9.2 Philosophic Model of the User

9.3 The Hyper-knowledge Framework

9.4 A Modern Human Knowledge System

9.5 Emerging Paradigm and Its Functionality

9.6 New Technology with the FUSION Paradigm

9.7 Individual, Collective AND Machine Wisdom Generation

9.8 Summary

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 10.

The Cross-Scientific Approach for Human-Compatible Systems: Acting with Modern Decision Tools

10.1 INTRODUCTION

10.2 Democratic Corporate cultures

10.3 Current Situations in ManagEMENT and Leading

10.4 Cross-Scientific Approach

10.5 Co-evolute Approach

10.6 Application Context and Environment

10.7 Summary

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 11.

Agility Application, Ontology, and Concepts in a Technology Company Context: Agility Boosts Collective Wisdom

11.1 Introduction

11.2 The NAture of Agility

11.3 Defining AGILITY Ontology

11.4 Creating Agility Ontologies

11.5 Agility Application catenary

11.6 agility CASE Study in finland

11.7 agility Case STUDY Results

11.8 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Section 3. The Company Democracy Model.

Chapter 12.

The Company Democracy Model for Organizational 
Management and Leadership Strategies.
The Innovative Company Democracy Model.

12.1 INTRODUCTION

12.2 The capability and maturity to change

12.3 Research Foundations

12.4 Basic prinCiples of the spiral model

12.5 Responsive Environment for Democratic Development in Organizations

12.6 The Spiral Method for Knowledge Creation of Democratic Behavior

12.7 Methods for Qualitative Analysis OF Organizational Democracy

12.8 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 13.

The Levels of the Company Democracy Model: A Spiral Co-Evolution.

13.1 INTRODUCTION

13.2 The SiX LEvels of the COMPANY democracy model

13.2.1 CDM Level 1: Democratic Culture and Knowledge based Strategy.

13.2.2 CDM Level 2: Democratic Culture-based Business Models, Structures, and Knowledge Engines

13.2.3 CDM Level 3: Democratic Culture Knowledge-based Process & Project Management & Engineering

13.2.4 CDM Level 4: Democratic Culture Innovation Development & Management

13.2.5 CDM Level 5: Democratic Culture Innovation based Competitive Operations

13.2.6 CDM Level 6: Democratic Culture Optimization & International Alliances

13.3 Reading the Company Democracy Levels

13.4 LEvel CATEGORIES

13.5 Company democracy model Strategies

13.6 COMPANY DEMOCRACY INFLECTION POINTS

13.7 EFFORT BASED EFFECTIVENESS

13.8 The Effort–Benefit Relationship of the Model

13.9 Company democracy model indICes

13.10 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 14.

Human Perception, Interpretation, Understanding and Communication of Company Democracy: Building Co-opetitive Ecosystems

14.1 INTRODUCTION

14.2 Analyzing the phenomenon of Company Democracy

14.3 Pre-conditions, Operations, and Post-conditions for Innovation

14.4 Staged Pre-conditions, Operations, and Post-conditions of the Company Democracy Model

14.5 SucCESS Stage (pre-coNDITIONS): Human and Ethical Infrastructure

14.6 REWARDS Stage (EXECUTION): Co-opetition and Co-evolution process

14.7 SHARE STAGE (Post-Conditions): SHARED ADDED VALUE NETWORKS

14.8 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 15.

The Company Democracy Model for Human Intellectual Capitalism and Shared Value Creation: Towards Added Value and Circular Economies

15.1 INTRODUCTION

15.2 The Value of Sharing

15.3 The CIRCULAR ECONOMY

15.4 The Shared Value of Democracy

15.5 From Company Democracy to Human Capitalism

15.6 From Human Capitalism to Added Value

15.7 From Added Value to Shared Value

15.8 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 16.

Maturity Spaces for Company Democracy: The Seven Clouds of Glory

16.1 INTRODUCTION

16.2 The neo manager BUZZWORD PHENOMENON

16.3 INNOVATION PARADOX

16.4 UNDERSTANDING INNOVATION

16.5 THE POWER OF KNOWLEDGE

16.6 PEOPLE'S KNOWLEDGE

16.7 EMPHASIS ON PEOPLE

16.8 THE DYNAMIC COMPANY DEMOCRACY SPACE

16.9 THE COMPANY DEMOCRACY SPACE Levels

16.10 Space for HUMAN CAPITAL AND SHARED VALUE INNOVATION

16.11 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 17.

The Dynamics of Company Democracy Culture: Enlightening the Black Hole in Knowledge Management

17.1 INTRODUCTION

17.2 Knowledge and knoWledge management

17.3 Knowledge definitions

17.4 Managing Knowledge

17.5 Modeling Knowledge

17.6 The Black Hole

17.7 True knowledge

17.8 knowledge and Knowledge management driven company cultures

17.9 Knowledge Creation and Wisdom Generation

17.10 The Company Democracy Model on Knowledge Engineering and Management

17.11 SUMMARY

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 18.

Applying the Company Democracy Model. From Theory to Practice

18.1 overview of the Company DemocracY Model

18.2 The Company democracy model SPIRAL

18.3 LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION APPROACH

18.4 MODEL IMPLEMENTATION APPROACHES

18.4.1 Organizational Link Approach (for SMEs)

18.4.2 Bottom-Up Approach (for Large Organizations)

18.5 ALTERNATIVE IMPLEMENTATION Processes

18.5.1 Plan-Driven Implementation Process

18.5.2 Assessment-Driven Process

18.5.3 Training-Driven Implementation Process

18.6 Supporting Software Applications

18.6.1 Software Application ACCORD

18.6.2 Software Application PURSOID

18.6.3 Software Application FOLIUM

18.7 Benefits of the Company Democracy Model for Innovation Management and Leadership

18.7.1 Individual Benefits

18.7.2 Organizational Benefits

18.7.3 Economic Impact

18.8 summary

Questions for review and discussions

REFERENCES

Chapter 19.

Repetition is the Mother of Studying, Learning, and Internalization. Concluding Remarks with the Company Democracy Model and Applied Philosophy for Management and Leadership;

SECTION 1. Applied Philosophy IN MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP

A. 1. The situation in your company

A.2. Managers and leaders in your company

SECTION 2. HUMAN FOCUS IN LIVING SYSTEMS

B.1. Individuals in the business situation

B.2. Supply and demand in the business situation

SECTION 3. tHE COMPANY DEMOCracy model

C.1. Company Democracy Model in theory

C.2. Company Democracy Model in practice

CONCLUSIONS - EPILOGUE

GLOSSARY

 

REFERENCES.    

INDEX  

 

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Author(s)

Biography

Dr. Evangelos Markopoulos was born in Kalamata Greece in 1967. He is an expert, entrepreneur, and scholar on Process and Project Management, Enterprise Engineering, Knowledge Management, and Innovation & Entrepreneurship. He holds a BA in Computer Science with a minor in Mathematics, from the City University of New York, an MSc on Computer Science with a concentration in Artificial Intelligence from New York University, and a Ph.D. on ICT Project and Investments Management from University of Piraeus (Greece). He has worked as a computer scientist in the USA at ΙΒΜ, Siemens, and Bell Laboratories of AT&T. As an academic, he has worked in universities such as Hult International Business School, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), University College London (UCL), City University New York, (CUNY), Vaasa University (VU) and Turku University of Applied Sciences (TUAS). He won the 2018 HULT Prize Global Social Innovation competition with his UCL students, and he is part of the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI-U) for Sustainable Innovation. Dr. Hannu Vanharanta was born in 1949 in Pori, Finland. He matriculated in 1967 and took his M.Sc. in Chemical Engineering at Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. He began his professional career as a Technical Assistant at the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry. He entered then the engineering industry and gained valuable practical experience in many fields of industrial management. In 1995 he got his Ph.D. degree in Industrial Management at Åbo Akademi and started his academic career. He has had full professorships at the University of Joensuu, Lappeenranta University of Technology and Tampere University of Technology, Finland, and has now after retirement been visiting professor at Vaasa University and Poznan University of Technology. He has over 300 articles and publications in international journals and conferences.