1st Edition

The Limits of Family Influence
Genes, Experience, and Behavior

By

Rowe.



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ISBN 9780898621488
Published November 1, 1995 by Guilford Press
232 Pages

USD $36.00

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Book Description

Most parents believe that their child's personality and intellectual development is a direct result of their child-rearing practices and home environment. This belief is supported by many social scientists who contend that the influences of "nature" and "nurture" are inseparable. Challenging such universally accepted assumptions, The Limits of Family Influence argues that socialization science has placed too heavy an emphasis on the family as the bearer of culture. Similarly, it reveals how the environmental variables most often named in socialization science--such as social class, parental warmth, and one- versus two-parent households--may also be empty of causal influence on child outcomes such as intelligence, personality, and psychopathology.

Table of Contents

1. The Primacy of Child Rearing in Socialization Theory

2. Separating Nature and Nurture

3. As the Twig is Bent?: Families and Personality

4. Limited Rearing Effects on Intelligence (IQ)

5. Uniting Nature and Nurture: The Genetics of Environmental Measures

6. Gender Differences

7. Why Families Have Little Influence

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Reviews

"Exciting and provocative....An excellent selection for a graduate level or upper-level undergraduate course on the family. Even for readers well versed in behavior genetics, this book will provide a handy reference and be an enjoyable read." - -Family Relations

"Rowe gives a masterly presentation....What he has to say should be known by every psychologist, sociologist, criminologist, educationalist, marriage guidance experts, and even politicians....A wonderful university course could be based on it..." - -Personality and Individual Differences