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The Ottoman World, the Mediterranean and North Africa, 1660–1760



ISBN 9781409464822
Published June 3, 2013 by Routledge
324 Pages

 
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Book Description

Dr Heywood’s second volume of collected papers in the Variorum series brings together fourteen studies published between 2000 and 2010. They represent two of the main strands of his interests during the past decade: the era of Ottoman history dominated by the ministerial family of Köprülü; and the maritime history of the ’post-Braudelian’ Mediterranean, in the later 17th and early 18th centuries. Aspects of the Köprülü era under examination in Part One include the shifting chronology of the Çehrin campaign of 1678; a study of the role of renegades in Ottoman service, linked in this instance to the Venetian betrayal of the Cretan fortress of Grabusa to the Ottomans in 1691, and a study of the reorganisation of the Ottoman state courier service in 1696, together with three studies of English diplomacy at the Porte during the ’Long War’ of 1683-99. In Part Two maritime and Mediterranean themes predominate. Four papers revolve around the complexities of the English maritime and commercial presence in Algiers in the decades before and after 1700, and two examine the Ottoman maritime frontier in the western Mediterranean and in the Aegean in the same period. The volume concludes with a look at the daily (and mainly maritime) uncertainties in the life of the French community in Cyprus at the turn of the eighteenth century, and an examination of the emergence of Fernand Braudel’s intellectual involvement with Ottoman history, down to the publication in 1949 of his epochal study of the Mediterranean in the age of Philip II.

Table of Contents

Contents: Preface; Part I Ottomanics: Aspects of the Köprülü Era: The shifting chronology of the Chyhyryn (Çehrin) campaign (1089/1678) according to the Ottoman literary sources, and the problem of the Ottoman calendar; All for love?: Lucca della Rocca and the betrayal of Grabusa (1691); A Buyuruldu of A.H. 1100 / A.D. 1689 for the dragomans of the English embassy at Istanbul; English self and Ottoman other in the late 17th century: Lord Paget at the Porte, 1692-1699; An undiplomatic Anglo-Dutch dispute at the Porte: the quarrel at Edirne between Coenraad van Heemskerck and Lord Paget (1693); Two firmans of Mustafa II on the reorganisation of the Ottoman courier system (1108/1696) (Documents from the Thessaloniki Cadi Sicills). Part II Between North Africa and Cyprus: Mediterranean Maritime Studies: An English merchant and consul-general in Algiers, c.1676-1712: Robert Cole and his circle; Anglo-Maghrebi shipbroking in North Africa in the late 17th Century: an Arabic document from Algiers (1094/1683); What’s in a name?: some Algerine fleet lists (1686-1714) from British libraries and archives; Ideology and the profit motive in the Algerine Corso: the strange case of the Isabella of Kirkcaldy, 1709-1714; A frontier without archaeology? The Ottoman maritime frontier in the Western Mediterranean, 1660-1760; Ottoman territoriality versus maritime usage: the Ottoman Islands and English privateering in the wars with France 1689-1714; ‘The economics of uncertainty’?: the French merchant community in Cyprus at the turn of the18th century; Fernand Braudel and the Ottomans: the emergence of an involvement (1928-50): Index.

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Author(s)

Biography

Dr Colin Heywood is an Honorary Research Fellow at the Maritime Historical Studies Centre, University of Hull, UK.

Reviews

'Heywood’s strength lies in his plumbing the depths of archival materials (mostly sources in English and Italian from the Public Record Office in London and other archives, but also documents in Ottoman Turkish and Arabic), and assembling various pieces of those materials to tell a story. One sees individuals and hears conversations in this work.' International Journal of Maritime History