The Role of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy in Asthma Mortality  book cover
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The Role of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy in Asthma Mortality




ISBN 9780367236618
Published May 23, 2019 by CRC Press
288 Pages

 
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Book Description

First published in 1993, the Role of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy in Asthma Mortality provides the first comprehensive review of the role of beta-receptor agonist drug therapy and asthma mortality. The book includes sections on the epidemiological and experimental methods used to examine possible relationships between beta-agonist drug therapy and asthma mortality. It also reviews the development of beta-agonist drugs and the long-term trends in asthma mortality to present a historical perspective. Internationally respected experts have contributed to this unique volume, making it essential for epidemiologists, pharmacologists, and researchers in clinical medicine and public health.

Table of Contents

Preface. Historical Overview: The Development of Beta Receptor Agonist Drugs (S.R. O'Donnell). Studies of Time Trends in Asthma Mortality: A Century of Asthma Mortality (R.T. Jackson). Asthma Mortality Epidemics: The Problem Approached Epidemiologically (P. Stolley and T. Lasky). Analytical Epidemiological Studies of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy and Asthma Mortality: Epidemiological Methods for Studying the Role of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy in Asthma Mortality (N.E. Pearce and J.Crane). The New Zealand Case-Control Studies of Asthma Deaths Fenoterol: Interpratation and Clinical and Drug Regulatory Implications (J.M. Elwood). The Pharmacological Effects of Beta Receptor Agonist Drugs: An Overview of Experimental Methods (C.D. Burgess). The Role of Hypoxemia in Determining the Cardiovascular Response to Beta Receptor Agonist Drugs (R.G. Shanks). The Acute and Long-Term Effects of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy: The Acute Unwanted Effects of Beta2 Receptor Agonist Therapy (M.J. Kendall and C.A. Haffner). The Long Term Effects of Beta Receptor Agonist Therapy in Relation to Morbidity and Mortality (C.S. Wong and A.E. Tattersfield). The Future: Long-Acting Inhaled Beta2 Receptor Agonist Drugs (K.F. Chung and P.J. Barnes). Asthma Mortality and Beta Receptor Agonists-A Perspective (J. Crane).

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Author(s)

Biography

Richard Beasley, M.D., is Professor of Medicine at the Wellington School of Medicine, University of Otago Medical School and Consultant Physician at Wellington Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand. Dr. Beasley graduated in 1979 from the University of Otago Medical School with an MBChB degree and became a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 1985. He then took up a New Zealand Medical Research Council-Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, before returning to the Wellington School of Medicine in 1987 and was appointed to the Chair of Medicine in 1993. He was awarded his M.D. degree from the University of Southampton in 1990, and returned to that institution as a Medical Research Council (U.K.) Visiting Senior Scientist in 1992. Dr. Beasley is a member of the American Thoracic Society, British Thoracic Society, European Respiratory Society, Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand, and the Collegium Internationale Allergologicum. He is President of the Australian Chapter of the International Association of Asth- mology and has served on a number of advisory committees including the Expert Panel of the FDA Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. Dr. Beasley is author of more than one hundred papers in the medical literature. His current major research interests in the field of asthma are related to epidemiology, pharmacology, and management. Neil Pearce, Ph.D,, is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Medicine in the Wellington School of Medicine. Dr. Pearce obtained his training at the Wellingtoi School of Medicine, completing his Ph.D. degree in epidemiology in 1985 From 1985 to 1987 he carried out epidemiological research in the Departim nt of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded by an Overseas Research Fellowship of the Health Research Council of New Zealand. Since 1987 he has primarily carried out teaching and research in epidemiology at the Wellington School of Medicine, but during 1992 to 1993 he is based at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, was recipient of a Visiting Scientist Award. He is currently engaged in fulltime epidemiological research in the Wellington School of Medicine with funding from the Health Research Council of New Zealand; his asthma epidemiology research is conducted as a member of the Wellington Asthma Research Group (directed by Drs. Beasley, Burgess, Crane, and Pearce), which is funded by a Programme Grant from the Health Research Council of New Zealand. Dr. Pearce is a member of the Australasian Epidemiology Association, the International Epidemiology Association, the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, and the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand. Dr. Pearce has co-authored a textbook of occupational epidemiology, and more than one hundred papers. His current major research interests include asthma epidemiology, occupational and environmental epidemiology, cancer epidemiology, and epidemiological methods.