The Study of Human Development: The Future of the Field (Hardback) book cover

The Study of Human Development

The Future of the Field

Edited by Richard A. Settersten Jr., Megan M. McClelland

© 2018 – Routledge

218 pages

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Hardback: 9781138306783
pub: 2017-11-07
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Description

If you had just one wish for the study of human development, what would it be? How would it advance the field? And what would it take for your vision to be realized? This was the charge given to twenty-eight scholars, coming from different disciplines and fields, and who study different periods of the life course. This book compiles provocative contributions from a wide range of established scholars, organized into seven thematic areas: conceptual advances; systems, levels, and contexts; individual differences; methodological advances; harnessing science for human welfare and social justice; underexplored life course dynamics; and interdisciplinary collaboration and playing well with others. This book was originally published as a special issue of Research in Human Development.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Just One Wish for the Study of Human Development Richard A. Settersten, Jr. and Megan McClelland

Part I: Conceptual Advances

1. Taking Conceptual Analyses Seriously Willis F. Overton

2. On the Need to Seriously Challenge the Empiricist Side of the Nativist–Empiricist Debate David C. Witherington

3. Eliminating Genetic Reductionism from Developmental Science Richard M. Lerner

4. How Can Developmental Systems Theories Cope With Free Will? The Importance of Stress-Related Growth and Mindfulness Carolyn M. Aldwin

Part II: Systems, Levels, and Contexts

5. An Observatory for Life Courses: Populations, Countries, Institutions, and History Karl Ulrich Mayer

6. Toward a Vigorous Incorporation of Culture in the Study of Human Development Kristine J. Ajrouch

7. Right in Front of Us: Taking Everyday Life Seriously in the Study of Human Development Dale Dannefer

8. Relationships in Time and the Life Course: The Significance of Linked Lives Richard A. Settersten, Jr.

Part III: Individual Differences

9. Tracing Three Lines of Personality Development Dan P. McAdams

10. Towards a New Synthesis for Development in Adulthood Karen Hooker

11. Why Should Cognitive Developmental Psychology Remember that Individuals Are Different? Anik de Ribaupierre

Part IV: Methodological Advances

12. Fellow Scholars: Let’s Liberate Ourselves from Scientific Machinery Alexander von Eye and Wolfgang Wiedermann

13. Toward an Empirically Robust Science of Human Development Greg J. Duncan

14. Getting at Developmental Processes Through Experiments Alexandra M. Freund

15. Methodological Practice as Matters of Justice, Justification, and the Pursuit of Verisimilitude Todd D. Little

Part V: Harnessing Science for Human Welfare and Social Justice

16. Human Developmental Science for Social Justice Stephen T. Russell

17. Understanding and Watering the Seeds of Compassion Mark T. Greenberg and Christa Turksma

18. Research that Helps Move Us Closer to a World Where Each Child Thrives Adele Diamond

19. Mothering Mothers Suniya S. Luthar

Part VI: Underexplored Life Course Dynamics

20. Toward a New Science of Academic Engagement Katariina Salmela-Aro

21. Recognizing Civic Engagement as a Critical Domain of Human Development Lonnie R. Sherrod

22. Contribution of Adolescence to the Life Course: What Matters Most in the Long Run? John Schulenberg and Julie Maslowsky

23. Mind the Gap in the Middle: A Call to Study Midlife Margie E. Lachman

Part VII: Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Playing Well With Others

24. Towards Truly Interdisciplinary Research on Human Development Ursula M. Staudinger

25. Teams Do It Better! Toni C. Antonucci

26. Let’s Work Together: Towards Interdisciplinary Collaboration Ingrid Schoon

27. The Study That Got Away Frank F. Furstenberg

28. Understanding Human Development: Toward a Comprehensive Framework Frederick J. Morrison

About the Editors

Richard A. Settersten is Professor of Human Development and Family Sciences and Endowed Director of the Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families at Oregon State University, USA. His research examines transitions across the life course, and has most recently focused on the longer and more uncertain process of becoming an adult today.

Megan M. McClelland is the Katherine E. Smith Professor of Healthy Children and Families in Human Development and Family Sciences at Oregon State University, USA. Her research focuses on optimizing children's development, especially as it relates to children’s self-regulation from early childhood to adulthood.

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC026000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / General