Translation: An Advanced Resource Book (Paperback) book cover

Translation

An Advanced Resource Book

By Basil A Hatim, Jeremy Munday

© 2005 – Routledge

400 pages

Purchasing Options:$ = USD
Paperback: 9780415283069
pub: 2004-12-02
$49.95
x
Hardback: 9780415283052
pub: 2004-12-02
$160.00
x


FREE Standard Shipping!

Description

Routledge Applied Linguistics is a series of comprehensive textbooks, providing students and researchers with the support they need for advanced study in the core areas of English language and Applied Linguistics.

Each book in the series guides readers through three main sections, enabling them to explore and develop major themes within the discipline.

  • Section A, Introduction, establishes the key terms and concepts and extends readers’ techniques of analysis through practical application.
  • Section B, Extension, brings together influential articles, sets them in context, and discusses their contribution to the field.
  • Section C, Exploration, builds on knowledge gained in the first two sections, setting thoughtful tasks around further illustrative material. This enables readers to engage more actively with the subject matter and encourages them to develop their own research responses.

Throughout the book, topics are revisited, extended, interwoven and deconstructed, with the reader’s understanding strengthened by tasks and follow-up questions.

Translation:

  • examines the theory and practice of translation from a variety of linguistic and cultural angles, including semantics, functional linguistics, corpus and cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis, gender studies and postcolonialism
  • draws on a wide range of languages, including French, Spanish, German, Italian, Russian and Arabic
  • explores material from a variety of sources, such as the Internet, advertisements, religious texts, literary and technical texts
  • gathers together influential readings from the key names in the discipline, including James S. Holmes, George Steiner, Vinay and Darbelnet, Eugene Nida, Werner Koller and Ernst-August Gutt.

Written by experienced teachers and researchers in the field, Translation: An Advanced Resource Book is an essential textbook for students and researchers of English language and Applied Linguistics.

The accompanying website to this book can be found at http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/041528306X

Reviews

'To complement and enrich this truly innovative advanced resource book, there is a very useful website where students can browse in search of further text samples, translations, and updated information on developments and events pertaining to the discipline of Translation Studies.' The Linguist List

'Fills a space that I'm sure many translation academics feel needs to be filled … This book will help to define and shape translation pedagogy for the next few years. In brief, I see it as Mona Baker's In Other Words ten years on.' - Stuart Campbell, University of Western Sydney

'This truly comprehensive work is doubly innovative: it goes beyond the abstract presentation of translation issues and concepts and it is interactive, containing many exercises and readings to help readers explore all aspects of translation theory and improve their translation skills. Add to this the use of English back translation … and you have a resource that is destined to enjoy broad appeal and become a primary textbook for undergraduate and graduate programs in translation, modern languages and linguistics.' - Malcolm Williams, University of Ottawa, Canada

Table of Contents

Section A: Introduction A1. What is Translation? A2. Translation Strategies A3. The Unit of Translation A4. Translation Shifts A5. The Analysis of Meaning A6. Dynamic Equivalence and the Receptor of the Message A7. Textual Pragmatics and Equivalence A8. Translation and Relevance A9. Text Type in Translation A10. Text Register in Translation A11. Text, Genre and Discourse Shifts in Translation A12. Agents of Power in Translation A13. Ideology and Translation A14. Translation in the Information Technology Era Section B: Extension B1. What is Translation? B2. Translation Strategies B3. The Unit of Translation B4. Translation Shifts B5. The Analysis of Meaning B6. Dynamic Equivalence and the Receptor of the Message B7. Textual Pragmatics and Equivalence B8. Translation and Relevance B9. Text Type in Translation B10. Text Register in Translation B11. Text, Genre and Discourse Shifts in Translation B12. Agents of Power in Translation B13: Ideology and Translation B14. Translation in the Information Technology Era Section C: Exploration C1. What is Translation? C2. Translation Strategies C3. The Unit of Translation C4. Translation Shifts C5. The Analysis of Meaning C6. Dynamic Equivalence and the Receptor of the Message C7. Textual Pragmatics and Equivalence C8. Translation and Relevance C9. Text Type in Translation C10. Text Register in Translation C11. Text, Genre and Discourse Shifts in Translation C12. Agents of Power in Translation C13. Ideology and Translation C14. Translation in the Information Technology Era: Developing Words and Cultures. Glossary. Bibliography

About the Authors

Basil Hatim is Professor of Translation and Linguistics at Heriot Watt University, UK and Professor of English and Translation at the American University of Sharjah, UAE. He is very well known internationally for his books with Ian Mason and single-authored texts. Jeremy Munday is Deputy Director of the Centre for Translation Studies, University of Surrey, UK and author of our very successful Introducing Translation Studies. Both are practising translators as well as theorists and experienced teachers.

About the Series

Routledge Applied Linguistics

Routledge Applied Linguistics is a series of comprehensive resourcebooks, providing students and researchers with the support they need for advanced study of English applied linguistics and language.
Each book carefully guides the reader through three main sections, enabling them to explore and develop major themes within the discipline:
*Section A, Introduction, establishes the key terms and concepts and extends readers' techniques of analysis through practical application
*Section B, Extension, brings together influential articles, sets them in context, and discusses their contribution to the field
*Section C, Exploration, builds on knowledge gained in the first two sections, setting thoughtful tasks around further illustrative material. This enables readers to engage more actively with the subject matter and encourages them to develop their own responses.
Throughout the books, topics are revisited, extended, interwoven and deconstructed, with the reader's understanding strengthened by tasks and follow-up questions.
*ALL TITLES ARE AVAILABLE AS INSPECTION COPIES

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
LAN000000
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / General
LAN009000
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General

eResource

How to Use Translation

Translation, both commercial and literary, is an activity that is growing phenomenally in today’s globalized world. The study of translation, an interdisciplinary field known as Translation Studies, has also developed enormously in the past twenty years. It interfaces with a wide range of other disciplines from linguistics and modern languages to Cultural Studies and postcolonialism. This book attempts to investigate both the practice and the theory of translation in an accessible and systematic way. It is designed specifically with the needs in mind of students of Masters degrees and final year undergraduates in translation or applied linguistics, research students beginning to investigate the field, and practising translators who wish to examine the theory behind the practice. It is hoped that it will also provide useful insights and examples for more experienced researchers.

The book is divided into three sections (A, B and C) and 14 units. Each unit is treated in each of the sections.

Section A of each unit introduces the main concepts of each area of translation and presents reflective tasks to encourage the reader to think through the theory. Key concept boxes highlight and summarize the main points.

Section B, the extension stage, then presents one or two readings, which are extracts from key articles or books on the relevant subject. Each reading is accompanied by brief tasks: Before you read aids recall of the Section A concepts, As you read brings out the crucial elements of the reading and After you read recapitulates the main points and prepares for exploration.

Section C is the exploration section. It critiques and develops the previous sections with a series of tasks and projects that at first provide the reader with specific data to investigate and then encourage wider exploration and original research in the reader’s own linguistic and cultural context.

A detailed glossary is supplied at the end covering central terms of Translation Studies, including some from linguistics and Cultural Studies. These terms are highlighted in bold in the main text for ease of reference. Finally, a full bibliography brings together the theory references. A very focused Further Reading list is also accompanies each unit.

Of course, the study of translation inevitably presupposes knowledge of more than one language. However, the book has been designed for use by readers from any language background who have an advanced level of English, whether or not they are native speakers. In the translation examples, English is therefore always either the source (original) language or the target language. The other languages covered are varied, including the major European languages and Arabic.

The many different tasks that are part of the basic framework of the book are designed in such a way that they can be used either by readers working on their own, or in pairs or groups in a more formal teaching situation. Section A tasks are designed to encourage the reader to reflect on the validity and application of the theoretical concepts and to relate them to their own experience. In Section B, the ‘After you read’ tasks may lend themselves to an oral presentation by one member of a class, followed by discussion, or to a short essay-type response in the early stages of assessment. In Section C, the tasks are more extensive, especially the ‘projects’ which in some cases may develop into full-scale research projects and even doctoral theses! Although data are provided and a methodology suggested, the more complex projects will work best when the student actively researches new material and has the opportunity of interviewing or observing professional translators. Sometimes that professional may in fact be the teacher of a translation class.

The cross-referenced contents list describes each unit (1 to 14) and each section (A, B and C). This allows the book to be followed either ‘vertically’ or ‘horizontally’. That is, it can be read linearly from beginning to end (all Section A units, then all Section B units, then all Section C units) or thematically through a unit (e.g. Unit 1 Section A, followed by Unit 1 Section B, Unit 1 Section C, and so on). Many readers or teachers may find the thematic order particularly useful, especially since Section C usually critiques the concepts presented in Section A and B of the same unit and which may then be further developed in Section A of the subsequent unit.

Further Reading

The book presents and explores many concepts, but these can only be properly extended by careful pursuit of the further reading and the research projects. The following reference books may prove to be of particular value in the initial stages of this research:

  • Mona Baker (ed. 1998) The Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies, London & New York: Routledge.
  • David Crystal (2003, 5th ed.) A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics, Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Jeremy Munday (2001) Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and applications, London & New York: Routledge.
  • Mark Shuttleworth and Moira Cowie (1997) Dictionary of Translation Studies, Manchester: St Jerome.
  • Lawrence Venuti (ed. 2000) The Translation Studies Reader, London & New York: Routledge.

We also recommend that the reader collect source material and text samples that may be valuable for the research projects. These could include one or more literary translations into the reader’s first language (plus a copy of the foreign language source text), a translation of a classic work such as Shakespeare, parallel texts (either pairs of original texts with their translation or pairs of non-translated texts on the same subject in different languages) and other examples encountered of translation (good and bad).

Extra Activities

Click on the link below to download the extra activities available. The activities are split-up into 18 projects, each a valuable learning companion for Translation.

Translation Projects

Useful Weblinks

Further Investigation

The following websites contain a wealth of material to assist further investigation into issues raised in the book:

English Language and Linguistics Arena
http://www.routledge.com/rcenters/linguistics
The American Literary Translators’ Association (ALTA)
http://www.literarytranslators.org/
Anthony Pym’s website
http://www.fut.es/~apym/welcome.html
Bibliography of Translation Studies
http://aix1.uottawa.ca/~lbowker/bibtsweb/bibts.htm
British Centre for Literary Translation
http://www.uea.ac.uk/eas/centres/bclt/bclt.intro.shtml
Canadian Translators Association
http://www.uottawa.ca/associations/act-cats/Eng/E_index.htm
Careers in Languages
http://lrc.wfu.edu/certificates/index/oldindex.html
CETRA (The Leuven Research Centre for Translation, Communication and Cultures)
http://fuzzy.arts.kuleuven.ac.be/cetra/
Eurodicautom
http://europa.eu.int/eurodicautom/Controller
European Association for Studies in Screen Translation
http://www.esist.org/
European Commission Translation homepage
http://europa.eu.int/comm/translation/index_en.htm
European Society for Translation Studies
http://est.utu.fi/
Federico Zanettin, corpus linguistics
http://www.federicozanettin.net/
Fédération Internationale des Traducteurs
http://www.fit-ift.org/
Index Translationum
http://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=7810&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html
Institute of Linguists
http://www.iol.org.uk/
Institute of Translation and Interpreting
http://www.iti.org.uk/indexMain.html
International Association for Translation and Intercultural Studies
http://www.iatis.org/
João Roque Dias, Glossaries
http://www.jrdias.com/JRD-Links.html
Localisation Industry Standards Association
http://www.lisa.org/
Translatio Discussion List
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/TRANSLATIO.html
Translation Research webring (Douglas Robinson’s website)
http://www.translationresearch.com/webring/
Translation Resources (Mona Baker’s website)
http://www.monabaker.com/tsresources/
Translation Resources (by Vassilis Korkas)
http://www.surrey.ac.uk/lcts/cts/resources.htm
Translation Studies Bibliography
http://www.benjamins.com/online/tsb/
The Translator’s Home Companion
http://www.lai.com/companion.html
Translation Studies Journals
Babel
http://www.benjamins.nl/cgi-bin/t_seriesview.cgi?series=Babel
Journal of Specialised Translation
www.jostrans.org
Meta
http://www.erudit.org/revue/meta/
Palimpsestes
http://www.palimpsestes.com/
Target
http://www.benjamins.nl/cgi-bin/t_seriesview.cgi?series=Target
The Translator
http://www.stjerome.co.uk/journal.html
Traduction Terminologie Rédaction
http://www.erudit.org/revue/ttr/
Translation and Literature
http://www.eup.ed.ac.uk/newweb/journals/Translation/index.html
Translation Journal
http://www.accurapid.com/journal/
Other publishers of translation books
John Benjamins
http://www.benjamins.nl/cgi-bin/t_seriesview.cgi?series=BTL
Multilingual Matters
http://www.multilingual-matters.com/
Rodopi
http://www.rodopi.nl/senj.asp?SerieId=ATS
Routledge
http://www.routledge.com/rcenters/linguistics/text/ts.html
St Jerome publishers
http://www.stjerome.co.uk/