Women, Families and the British Army, 1700–1880 Vol 4: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Women, Families and the British Army, 1700–1880 Vol 4

1st Edition

By Jennine Hurl-Eamon, Lynn MacKay

Routledge

293 pages

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Description

This series concentrates on women and the soldiers in the ranks whose lives they shared, assembling a wide body of evidence of their romantic entanglements and domestic concerns. The new military history of recent decades has demanded a broadening of the source base beyond elite accounts or those that concentrate solely on battlefield experiences. Armies did not operate in isolation, and men’s family ties influenced the course of events in a variety of ways. Campfollowing women and children occupied a liminal space in campaign life. Those who travelled "on the strength" of the army received rations in return for providing services such as laundry and nursing, but they could also be grouped with prostitutes and condemned as a ‘burden’ by officers. Parents, wives, and offspring left behind at home remained in soldiers’ thoughts, despite an army culture aimed at replacing kin with regimental ties. Soldiers’ families’ suffering, both on the march and back in Britain, attracted public attention at key points in this period as well.

This series provides, for the first time in one place, a wide body of texts relating to common soldiers’ personal lives: the women with whom they became involved, their children, and the families who cared for them. It brings hitherto unpublished material into print for the first time, and resurrects accounts that have not been in wide circulation since the nineteenth century. The collection combines the observations of officers, government officials and others with memoirs and letters from men in the ranks, and from the women themselves. It draws extensively on press accounts, especially in the nineteenth century. It also demonstrates the value of using literary depictions alongside the letters, diaries, memoirs and war office papers that form the traditional source base of military historians.

This fourth volume covers the period from the Treaty of Paris to the Declaration of War in 1854.

Table of Contents

Volume 4: From the Treaty of Paris to the Declaration of War in 1854

Edited by Lynn MacKay

Table of Contents

Introduction

Newspapers, Journals and Magazines

Part 1. Experiences of Courtship and Marriage

1.1. Courtship

The Annette Meyers Case:

1. ‘Murder of a Soldier in St. James’s Park’, Times of London, 5 February 1848, p. 6.

2. ‘Horrible and Deliberate Murder of a Soldier’, Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper, 13 February 1848, p. 6.

3. ‘Depravity of the British Army’, The Era, 13 February 1848, p. 8.

4. Old Bailey Proceedings, 28 February 1848trial of Annette Meyers for murdering Henry Ducker, a soldier who had abandoned her.

5. ‘Central Criminal Court—March 3, Old Court’, Morning Chronicle, 4 March 1848, p. 7.

6. ‘Abolition of Capital Punishments’, Times of London, 9 March 1848, p. 8.

7. ‘The Case of Annette Meyers’, The Era, 12 March 1848, p. 10.

8. ‘Respite of Annette Meyers’, Morning Chronicle, 13 March 1848, p. 6.

9. ‘Miscellanea’, The Examiner, 20 May 1848, p. 332.

10. Buck Adams, The Narrative of Private Buck Adams (Cape Town: Van Riebeck Society, 1941), pp. 164-6, 283-4.

11. George Calladine, The Diary of Colour-Serjeant George Calladine (London: Eden Fisher & Co., 1922), p. 17, pp. 96, 98.

12. Arthur Swinson and Donald Scott (eds), The Memoirs of Private Waterfield (London: Cassell, 1968), pp. 106-7.

1.2. Domestic Arrangements in the British Isles

1.2.1. Permission to Marry

13. ‘Military Flogging’, Morning Chronicle, 16 May 1817, p. 2.

14. J. H. Stocqueler, The British Soldier: an Anecdotal History of the British Army (London: Wm. S. Orr, 1857), pp. 272-6.

1.2.2. Travel

15. ‘A distressing accident’, Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser, 28 December 1815, p. 4.

a. The Rifle Brigade Women

16.Most Barbarous Outrage Committed by the Rebels’, Morning Chronicle, 26 February 1822, p. 4.

17. ‘Ireland’, Glasgow Herald, 8 March 1822, p. 8.

18. ‘A strong Refutation’, Bristol Mercury, 23 March 1822, p. 1.

19. ‘Ireland’, Glasgow Herald, 29 March 1822, p. 4.

20. ‘County of Cork Assizes’, Derby Mercury, 17 April 1822, p. 2.

21. Sir William Cope, History of the Rifle Brigade (London: Chatto & Windus, 1877), p. 223.

22. ‘The 2d Division’, Jackson’s Oxford Journal, 23 December 1826, p. 1.

b. 53rd Regiment

23. ‘Heartrending Case’, Ipswich Journal, 31 August 1844, p. 3.

24. ‘Public Liberality’, Times of London, 2 September 1844, p. 6.

25. ‘Alleged "Heart-rending Case"’, Liverpool Mercury, 6 September 1844, p. 6.

26. ‘Chatham, September 11’, Times of London, 13 September 1844, p. 7.

27. ‘Shocking Accident’, Leeds Mercury, 5 September 1846, p. 7.

1.2.3. Morality and Reputation

28. ‘Recollections of the Inner Life’, The Thistle: A Monthly Journal of the Royal Scots, Vol. VI, No. 5 (July 1899), pp. 87-9.

29. Chips, ‘Soldiers' Wives’, Household Words Conducted by Charles Dickens, No. 76 (1851), pp. 561-2.

30. ‘The Church in the Army, No. 2’, The Morning Chronicle, 25 March 1852, p. 3.

1.2.4. Barracks

31. Anon., ‘The Education and Lodging of the Soldier’, Quarterly Review, Vol. 77 (1845-46), pp. 542-4, 551-2, 553-6.

32. A Private Dragoon, ‘Soldiers’ Wives’, St. Paul’s Magazine, Vol. 6 (1870), pp. 78-87.

33. The St. George's Barracks 1851 Manuscript Census Return, HO107/1481, pp. 390-405.

34. The Wellington Barracks 1851 Manuscript Census Return, HO107/1480, pp. 869-87.

1.2.5. Behaviour & Affection

35. ‘Union Hall’, Morning Chronicle, 9 January 1817, p. 3.

36. ‘At Stockbridge’, Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle, 24 August 1835, p. 4.

37. George Calladine, The Diary of Colour-Serjeant George Calladine (London: Eden Fisher & Co., 1922), pp. 100, 117, 130, 137, 157, 158, 163, 174, 187, 189, & 195.

38. Thomas Faughnan, Stirring Incidents in the Life of a British Soldier (Toronto: Hunter Rose, 1881), pp. 66-8.

39. Marquess of Anglesey (ed.), Sergeant Pearman's Memoirs (London: Jonathan Cape, 1968), pp. 122-7.

1.2.6. Family Disputes

40. ‘Thames’, Morning Chronicle, 5 October 1852, p. 8.

41. ‘Alleged Sending’, Reynolds's Newspaper, 10 October 1852, p. 10.

42. ‘Police–Thames’, Morning Chronicle, 11 October 1853, p. 11.

1.3. Domestic Arrangements Overseas

43. ‘Soldiers' Children’, Freeman's Journal & Daily Commercial Advertiser, 31 October 1850, p. 4.

44. ‘English Women in Hindustan’, The Calcutta Review, Vol. IV (July—December 1845), pp. 121-7.

45. John Ryder, Four Years' Service in India (Leicester: W.H. Burton, 1853), pp. 198-201.

46. Isaac Tyrrell, excerpts from England to the Antipodes & India (Madras: A.L.V. Press, 1904), pp. 25, 33, 47, 48, 49, 50.

47. Arthur Swinson & Donald Scott (ed.), The Memoirs of Private Waterfield (London: Cassell, 1968), pp. 108, 130.

48. ‘Ingenious, If Not Delicate’, The Examiner, 29 October 1826, p. 698.

49. Marquess of Anglesey (ed.), Sergeant Pearman's Memoirs (London: Jonathan Cape, 1968), p. 61.

1.4. Bigamy

50. Old Bailey Proceedings, Mary Fitzgerald, 19 August 1850 trial of Mary Fitzgerald for bigamy.

51. Old Bailey Proceedings, Thomas Glover, 27 October 1851 trial of Thomas Glover for bigamy.

1.5. Domestic Violence

52. Old Bailey Proceedings, John Davies, 9 April 1849 trial of John Davies for stabbing Ellen Davies, his wife.

Part 2. Economic Survival

2.1. Philanthropy

2.1.1. The Mendicity Society

53. ‘Police—Hatton Garden’, Morning Chronicle, 22 October 1821, p. 3.

54. Mendicity Society Annual Reports 1820-53, excerpts from the Appendices.

2.1.2. The Destitute Condition of Wives Left Behind

55. ‘Woolwich’, The Era, 15 August 1847, p. 13.

56. ‘Soldiers and their Wives’, Reynolds’s Newspaper, 4 July 1852, p. 1.

2.1.3. Philanthropic Housing

57. ‘The Church in the Army—No. IV’, The Morning Chronicle, 28 April 1852, p. 6.

2.2. State Relief

2.2.1. The Army

58. ‘Soldiers' Wives and Widows’, Caledonian Mercury, 25 January 1817, p. 4.

59. ‘Military Passes’, Caledonian Mercury, 20 October 1817, p. 4.

60. ‘Forged Passes’, Caledonian Mercury, 15 November 1817, p. 3.

61. ‘Imposition, Fraud, and Forgery’, Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser, 24 September 1818, p. 3.

62. ‘Police—Bow Street’, Times of London, 5 April 1823, p. 3.

63. ‘Police—Union Hall’, Times of London, 2 November 1831, p. 4.

64. ‘Police—Guildhall’, Times of London, 15 March 1832, p. 4.

65. ‘Police—Lambeth Street’, Times of London, 1 September 1832, p. 3.

2.2.2. Poor Relief

66. ‘Police’, The Examiner, 10 November 1816, p. 720.

67. Excerpts from the St. Martin in the Fields Settlement Examinations 1816-40, City of Westminster Archive Centre, F 5073.

68. ‘The New Poor Law Bill—Casual Relief’, Morning Chronicle, 30 October 1834, p. 4.

69. ‘Several Irish Women’, Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle, 21 April 1849, p. 4.

70. ‘The Kafir War’, The Morning Chronicle, 31 October 1851, p. 7.

71. ‘Board of Guardians’, Hampshire Telegraph & Sussex Chronicle, 12 February 1853, p. 5.

2.2.3. Education

72. Thomas Faughnan, Stirring Incidents in the Life of a British Soldier, (Toronto: Hunter Rose, 1881), pp. 68-9.

73. Thomas Faulkner, ‘The Royal Military Asylum’, An historical and topographical description of Chelsea, and its environs, (Chelsea: J. Tilling, 1810), pp. 205-22.

74. Royal Military Asylum [RMA], Board of Commissioners Minutes, 1813-21, National Archives, PRO WO143/8, pp. 33, 34, 38, 39, 40.

75. Regulations for the Establishment and Government of the Royal Military Asylum (Chelsea: Tilling & Hughes, 1819).

76. Report of the Quarter Master General respecting the female branch of this Asylum, Royal Military Asylum Commissioners' Minutes WO 143/9, 13 March 1821, pp. 4-10.

77. ‘Duke of York’s School’, Morning Chronicle, 16 October 1839, p. 3.

78. ‘Military School at Chelsea’, The Watchman, 23 October 1839, p. 350.

79. ‘Illiberality of Duke of York School’, Morning Chronicle, 1 November 1839, p. 3.

80. ‘National Education’, Edinburgh Review, April 1852, pp. 324-8.

2.3. Work

81. Henry Mayhew, ‘Labour and the Poor’, Morning Chronicle, 15 January 1850, pp. 5-6.

Part 3. Impact of War: Life in a War Zone

82. ‘Westminster Hospital’, Lloyd’s Weekly London Newspaper, 21 May 1843, p. 7.

Part 4. Sex Outside of Marriage

4.1 Sexual Assault & Rape

The Hurst Case

83. ‘Charge Against Military Officers’, Morning Chronicle, 26 October 1843, p. 3.

84. ‘Dublin Police—Yesterday’, Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 27 October 1843, p. 3.

85. ‘Exchange Court Office’,, Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 30 October 1843, p. 3.

86. ‘Olive Mount Institution of the Good Samaritan’, Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 31 October 1843, p. 2.

87. ‘Dublin Police—Yesterday’, Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 22 November 1843, p. 2.

88. ‘Dublin Police—Yesterday’, Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 23November 1843, p. 4.

89. ‘Dublin Police—Yesterday’, Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser, 28 November 1843, p. 4.

90. ‘From Our Own Reporter’, Morning Chronicle, 2 December 1843, p. 3.

91. John Ryder, Four Years' Service in India (Leicester: W.H. Burton, 1853), p. 129.

4.2. Prostitution

92. George Calladine, The Diary of Colour-Serjeant George Calladine (London: Eden Fisher & Co., 1922), pp. 84, 88.

Part 5. First Person Accounts

93. Edward Costello, Adventures of a Soldier (London: Colburn & Co., 1852), pp. 201-13.

94. Mary Ann Ashford, Life of a Licenced Victualler's Daughter (London: Saunders & Otley, 1844), pp. 49-91.

95. Royal Military Asylum, Board of Commissioners Minutes, 1821-32, 1833-46, National Archives, PRO WO143/9, pp. 386, 420, 436, 447, 456, 468 and PRO WO143/10 pp. 104, 108, 138.

96. John Mercier McMullen, Camp and Barrack-room, or the British Army As It Is (London: Chapman & Hall, 1846), pp. 34-5, 163-5, 238-9.

Part 6. Fictional Representations - Novels & Stories

97. S.C. Hall, ‘The Soldier’s Wife’, Jackson’s Oxford Journal, 6 December 1828, p. 4.

98. Mrs. Ward, ‘Married Soldiers in the Army’, Colburn's United Service Magazine (September & October, 1850), Part III (London: H. Hurst, 1850), pp. 49-55, 245-58.

99. Alexander Walker, ‘A Soldier’s Friendship’, Hours Off & On Sentry or Personal Recollections of Military Adventure in Great Britain, Portugal & Canada (Montreal: Jn. Lovell, 1859), pp. 10-63.

100. Charles Neill, ‘ Ellen of Ayr, or the Soldier’s Wife (Edinburgh: Charles Neill, 1856), pp. 32-46, 52-8, 158-71, 186, 188-97, 203-4, 229-30, 247-50, 253-6, 282-9, 299-310.

About the Authors

Jennine Hurl-Eamon is Associate Professor of History at Trent University, Canada

Lynn MacKay is Professor of History at Brandon University, Canada

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General