Work Safety Regulation in China : The CCP’s Fatality Quota System book cover
1st Edition

Work Safety Regulation in China
The CCP’s Fatality Quota System

By

Jie Gao




ISBN 9781138182448
Published April 1, 2022 by Routledge
262 Pages 28 B/W Illustrations

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Book Description

Fatality quotas implemented in China’s industrial section and local governments are being used to promote work safety and therefore, reducing the number of work-related deaths. Given the controversial nature of this policy, Gao analyzes how the fatality quotas are functioning to aid the country in balancing economic growth and social stability. The book also examines significant implications caused of this policy’s implementation in the local regions, and reveals how local officials attempt to handle these problems.

This is the first book to systematically examine the role of death indicators in work safety improvement in contemporary China, revealing insight into Beijing’s quota-oriented approach to policy-making.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2. Blood-Soaked GDP? 3. China’s Work Safety Management System 4. A Pony Too Small for the Big Cart 5. The Fatality Quota System 6. Why the Fatality Quotas? 7. Has Work Safety Improved? 8. Conclusion

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Author(s)

Biography

Jie Gao is an assistant professor at the Department of Political Science, National University of Singapore. Her research focuses on China’s political and administrative reforms, particularly in the areas of performance management, work safety regulation and cadre management.

Reviews

"In this important book, Jie Gao presents a masterful analysis of how the Chinese state has used the target management system to greatly improve its country’s work safety record, by instituting "quotas" of fatalities that local officials are not allowed to exceed. She convincingly examines both the successes and the limitations of the target-oriented mode of governance, reaching broader conclusions beyond this particular case. In doing so, the book makes major contributions to the literature on China's state capacity and authoritarian resilience. Her work will therefore be a "must-read" for political scientists and those interested in public administration, as well as for scholars of work safety."---Tim Wright, Emeritus Professor of Chinese Studies, University of Sheffield