Niall  Johnson Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Niall Johnson


Niall completed his PhD at the University of Cambridge. After working with a diverse range of organisations, including Hewlett Packard, British Sky Broadcasting and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, he joined the Australian Commission on Safety & Quality in Health Care. At the Commission he has worked in various topics areas, including clinical quality registries, clinical practice guidelines and on the Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Britain & the 1918-19 Influenza Pandemic: Johnson - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Medical Journal of Australia

Development of clinical quality registries in Australia - the way forward


Published: Apr 04, 2011 by Medical Journal of Australia
Authors: Sue M Evans, Ian A Scott, Niall P Johnson, Peter A Cameron and John J McNeil

Clinical registries provide a clinically credible means of monitoring health care processes and outcomes. Clinical registry development should be prioritised to target conditions or procedures that are suspected of being associated with large variations in processes or outcomes of care and that impact significantly on health care costs and patient morbidity. Registries should also aim to capture information across care and to monitor the safety and effectiveness of interventions.

Clinical Infectious Diseases

Questioning the Salicylates and Influenza Pandemic Mortality Hypothesis in 1918–


Published: Apr 15, 2010 by Clinical Infectious Diseases
Authors: Andrew Noymer, Daisy Carreon and Niall Johnson

Starko [1] presented an original and creative idea to explain a continuing medical mystery, the extreme virulence of the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic. Her hypothesis, that the use of salicylates exacerbated the tendency of the infection to produce fluid in the lungs, has face validity and is supported by anecdotal evidence of widespread use of aspirin in the United States during the pandemic. The international characteristics of the pandemic make the salicylate hypothesis difficult to sustain.

Medical Journal of Australia

Clinical-quality registries: their role in quality improvement


Published: Mar 01, 2010 by Medical Journal of Australia
Authors: John J McNeil, Sue M Evans, Niall P Johnson and Peter A Cameron

Registries can provide sound data needed by clinicians and organisations to improve patient safety and quality of care

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The 1918–1919 influenza pandemic in England and Wales: spatial patterns...


Published: Mar 07, 2008 by PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B: BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Authors: Gerardo Chowell, Luís M.A Bettencourt, Niall Johnson, Wladimir J Alonso, Cécile Viboud

We explored the association between influenza death rates, transmissibility and several geographical and demographic indicators for the autumn and winter waves of the 1918–1919 pandemic in cities, towns and rural areas of England and Wales.

Scottish Historical Review

Scottish 'flu – The Scottish Experience Of ‘Spanish Flu’


Published: Oct 01, 2004 by Scottish Historical Review
Authors: Niall Johnson

Scottish 'flu – The Scottish Experience Of ‘Spanish Flu’

Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers

The spatial anatomy of an epidemic: influenza in London and the county boroughs


Published: Feb 20, 2003 by Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers
Authors: Matthew Smallman–Raynor, Niall Johnson andAndrew D. Cliff

This paper examines the spatial structure of influenza transmission during the ten–month course of the epidemic in England and Wales, June 1918–April 1919, using the weekly counts of influenza deaths in London and the county boroughs as collated by the General Register Office, London.

Popolazione e Storia

Measuring a pandemic: Mortality, demography and geography


Published: Jan 01, 2003 by Popolazione e Storia
Authors: Niall Johnson

Influenza in 1918-19 was truly pandemic, extending into all parts of the world. Not only did it have a global extent, it exhibited marked universality – universality in reach and universality in impact.

Bulletin of the History of Medicine

Updating the Accounts: Global Mortality of the 1918-1920 "Spanish" Influenza Pan


Published: Sep 01, 2002 by Bulletin of the History of Medicine
Authors: Niall P. A. S. Johnson, Juergen Mueller

The recorded statistics of influenza morbidity and mortality are likely to be a significant understatement. This paper suggests that it was of the order of 50 million. However, it must be acknowledged that even this vast figure may be substantially lower than the real toll, perhaps as much as 100 percent understated. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2002.0022

Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Animating Geography: Multimedia and communication


Published: Mar 01, 2002 by Journal of Geography in Higher Education
Authors: Niall Johnson

Editorial

The Lancet Infectious Diseases

World War I may have allowed the emergence of “Spanish” influenza


Published: Feb 01, 2002 by The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Authors: J S Oxford, A Sefton, R Jackson, W Innes, R S Daniels, N P A S Johnson

We present an appraisal of epidemiological and mortality evidence of early outbreaks of respiratory disease in France and the UK in the years 1915 to 1917. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(02)00185-8

International Congress Series Volume 1219, October 2001, Pages 155–161

Early herald wave outbreaks of influenza in 1916 prior to the pandemic of 1918


Published: Oct 01, 2001 by International Congress Series Volume 1219, October 2001, Pages 155–161
Authors: J.S Oxford, A Sefton, R Jackson, W Innes, R.S Daniels, N.P.A.S Johnson

We present new epidemiological and mortality evidence of early outbreaks of influenza in France, UK, Norway, Germany and USA in the years 1915 to 1917. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0531-5131(01)00336-3

Nature Medicine

Who's that lady?


Published: Dec 01, 1999 by Nature Medicine
Authors: J.S. Oxford, A. Sefton, R. Jackson, N.P.A.S Johnson & R.S. Daniels

An analysis of scientific and social literature suggests that army bases located in France and the UK may be responsible for the worldwide distribution of the 'Spanish Lady' influenza pandemic of 1918.

Photos

News

New media piece - for BBC World Service - Pandemic: The Story of the 1918 Flu

By: Niall Johnson
Subjects: History

A new media appearance on the 1918 influenza pandemic. This one for the BBC. This stems from my PhD and subsequent book with Routledge.

Interactive Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation launched

By: Niall Johnson

Interactive Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation

 http://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/atlas

The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has developed an online interactive version of the Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation following the launch of the first hardcopy atlas in November 2015. The atlas covers the following clinical areas:

  • Antimicrobial dispensing
  • Diagnostic interventions
  • Surgical interventions
  • Interventions for mental health and psychotropic medicines
  • Opioid medicines
  • Interventions for chronic diseases.

The online interactive version provides users a new platform to interact and engage with the content and data in the atlas. The maps provide overlays of Primary Health Network and Local Hospital Network boundaries and pop-ups for each local area. The pop-ups depict graphically the local, state and national rate, and for some items, national and international comparison rates.

The online interactive atlas allows users to manipulate the maps, including being able to zoom in and out, move across the maps, and to interrogate the data behind the maps in various ways. The interactive atlas also allows users to examine and download or export the data in a range of formats.

www.safetyandquality.gov.au/atlas