Mia Ellen Minack Treacey Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Mia Ellen Minack Treacey

Researcher, writer, academic and screened historian.

I am a freelance researcher, academic and screened historian. I teach undergraduate through to HDR levels in the fields of history, film & television studies and screened history, at a variety of universities. Additionally, I work with diverse groups of researchers interested in screened history writing and publishing in forms that are accessible and interesting to the broadest possible audiences.

Biography

I am a freelance researcher, academic and screened historian. I teach in subjects and courses from undergraduate through to HDR levels in the fields of history, film & television studies, screen or cinema studies and screened history, at a variety of universities that value high quality education and its relationship to research. Additionally, I work with diverse groups of researchers interested in screened history (and related fields); writing and publishing in forms that are accessible and interesting to the broadest possible audiences. Furthermore, my research and writing extends beyond academia, to working with groups in broader community and other non-university organisations, e.g. with film, television, radio and new media production companies and networking organisations.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Areas of Research
    I teach, research and publish in the field screened history; which combines the fields of Historical studies and Film and Television studies.

    Professional Expertise
    Over the past 15 years I have also worked in a variety of sessional and contract positions as a lecturer and tutor in History, Film, Television and English subjects.

    I have worked as a theatre technician, a senior course adviser (Faculty of Arts, Monash University), a tenured academic (Monash University, Diploma of Tertiary Studies (DoTS, School of Social Sciences and Applied Media Studies, Faculty of Arts) and as a contract academic (Embedded Academic Transition, Higher Education Programs & Courses, Federation College, Federation University Australia).

    I am now moving into working as an academic on a more part-time basis to commit more time to researching and writing.

Personal Interests

    Like most academics my life revolves around teaching, researching and learning.

    However, I have an exceptionally large extended family (due to my husband and his four brothers) and now have more family events to attend than ever before (I'm an only child).

    I live in a suburb of Melbourne in a 1930s Art Deco house with my husband and our exceptionally demanding cat.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Reframing the Past - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Metro – film, television, radio, multimedia

Bastard Boys: Bastard History or Brilliant Drama?


Published: Mar 01, 2008 by Metro – film, television, radio, multimedia
Authors: Mia Treacey
Subjects: History, Media and Cultural Studies

An exploration of the connection between history and the media through the controversial Australian TV docudrama 'Bastard Boys' based on interviews with the series' director Ray Quint and one of the writers SueSmith.

Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management

Student Perspectives on Temporary and Permanent Exit from University


Published: Jul 01, 2004 by Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management
Authors: Peel, M., Powell, S. & Treacey, M.
Subjects: Education

Full title: Student Perspectives on Temporary and Permanent Exit from University: A case study from Monash University Analysis of reasons why students took leave or discontinued from an Arts degree at Monash University

Metro – film, television, radio, multimedia

Bitumen, Dirt Tracks and Lost Highways – Australian Road Movies


Published: Mar 01, 2000 by Metro – film, television, radio, multimedia
Authors: Mia Treacey
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

A select bibliography and filmography of Australian road movies.

News

New Project - sneak peak

By: Mia Ellen Minack Treacey
Subjects: Applied Arts & Music, Art & Visual Culture, Film and Video, History

I am currently working with Associate Professor and documentary filmmaker, Kim Nelson on a new interdisciplinary and international project. For a sneak peak at our interview with Emeritus Professor Robert A. Rosenstone, go to the Vimeo site link below.

Author presenting at film & history conference 2016

By: Mia Ellen Minack Treacey
Subjects: Applied Arts & Music, Film and Video, History

I am delighted I will be attending and presenting at this year’s Film & history conference in Milwaukee, Wisconsin!

While not my first visit to America, it will be my first to Milwaukee, and the first time I’ve been able to attend a Film and history conference.

When I saw the theme for this year’s conference in the call for papers – Gods & Heretics: Figures of Power and Subversion in Film & Television – I immediately thought of the individuals, organisations and publications I had read when researching Reframing the Past.

My paper is explores who the gods (and goddesses) and heretics of Screened History were and are, and the various acts of heresy and hubris (including my own) that have so characterised the field over the years:

Gods, heretics & hubris: reframing the past of history, film and television

In 2004 I began a journey to follow the footsteps of the ‘gods’ of film and history, to find the origins of the field so that I could try and understand where it had begun, and why historians working with film and television were still so often seen as ‘heretics’ by mainstream history. That journey resulted in a PhD – which saw me labeled a heretic by one examiner – and with the support of a number of the ‘gods’ of the field, it also resulted in the book Reframing the past: history, film and television. The book traced what historians have written about film and television from 1898 until the early 2000s. In an act of heresy (perhaps hubris) on my part, its central argument is that historical engagement with film and television should be reconceptualised as Screened History: an interdisciplinary, international field of research incorporating and replacing what has been known as ‘History and Film’.

My presentation will explore the challenges of being an outsider ‘looking in’ on a number of close-knit intellectual communities, of writing a ‘history’ from written documentation when some those of who lived it are still with us, and what the possibilities might be for future histories building on my heretical act. No longer ‘just’ a historian, but not ‘yet’ a film scholar, what does it mean to be a screened historian? Is it still the ultimate act of heresy?

So I am currently refining my paper and finalising the trip … might see you there!

University researcher releases major book about history, film and television

By: Mia Ellen Minack Treacey
Subjects: History, Media and Cultural Studies, Media, Journalism and Communications

A new book tracing what historians have written about film and television will be launched this Saturday, 12 March, by Dr Mia Treacey of Federation University Australia.

The book, Reframing the Past, will be launched at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI), at Federation Square, Melbourne.

It will be launched by Associate Professor Peter Howard of Monash University.

Reframing the Past traces what historians have written about film and television from 1898 to this century. Dr Treacey argues that historical engagement with film and television should be reconceptualised as screened history.     

“Combining a narrative of historical research on film and television with a reconceptualization of the field, the book will interest established scholars as well as new students to the field,” Dr Treacey, of Federation College, said.

The pioneering American historian in the field, Emeritus Professor Robert Rosenstone, has commented that:

"Treacey not only provides a much-needed and fascinating account of how for more than a century historians and critics have thought about the problems and possibilities of history in the visual media, she also makes a brilliant argument in favour of pulling together and reconceptualizing this sprawling, interdisciplinary area of study under the single title of Screened History".