Victoria Melangedd Redclift Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Victoria Melangedd Redclift

Lecturer in Sociology
University of Surrey

I am a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Surrey, where I work on the Sociology of ‘race’, ethnicity and migration with a particular focus on citizenship and political exclusion. I am the author of Statelessness and citizenship: Camps and the creation of ‘political space’ (Routledge, 2013), which was shortlisted for a BSA Phillip Abrams Memorial Prize, as well as New racial landscapes: Contemporary Britain and the neoliberal conjuncture (Routledge, 2014 – with James and Kim).

Biography

Victoria Redclift is a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Surrey, where she works on the Sociology of ‘race’, ethnicity and migration with a particular focus on citizenship and political exclusion. She is the author of Statelessness and citizenship: Camps and the creation of ‘political space’ (Routledge, 2013), which was shortlisted for the BSA Phillip Abrams Memorial Prize in 2014, as well as New racial landscapes: Contemporary Britain and the neoliberal conjuncture (Routledge, 2014 – with Malcolm James and Helen Kim). She won a Phillip Leverhulme Prize in 2014 and, along with an ESRC Future Research Leaders Grant for 2015, is currently conducting comparative research into experiences of citizenship among Bangladesh-origin Muslims in London, Birmingham and Los Angeles.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Statelessness and Citizenship: Redclift - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journal of International Migration and Integration

‘Subjectivity and citizenship: Intersections of space, place and identity among


Published: Sep 22, 2016 by Journal of International Migration and Integration
Authors: V.Redclift
Subjects: Sociology & Social Policy, Anthropology - Soc Sci

Drawing on the case of the 'Urdu-speaking' linguistic minority in Bangladesh, the paper examines the relationship between the material institution of citizenship and conditions of (physical) integration/segregation, and investigates a dissonance between the bureaucratic state recognition of citizenship and imaginations of that status among interviewees, the ‘identities of citizenship’ occupied at the local level.

Citizenship Studies

‘Abjects or agents? Camps, contests and the creation of ‘political space’’


Published: Sep 22, 2016 by Citizenship Studies
Authors: V.Redclift
Subjects: Sociology & Social Policy, Anthropology - Soc Sci, Asian Studies

Exploring differences of ‘camp’ and ‘non-camp’ based displacement, the article represents a critical evaluation of the way ‘political space’ is contested at the local level. In asking how and when a ‘stateless’ population is able to ‘access’ citizenship, through which processes and by which means, it reveals the tension, ambiguity and conceptual limitations of ‘statelessness’ and citizenship, unearthing a reality of partial, shifting and deceptively permeable terrain.

Ethnic and Racial Studies

‘Introduction: New racisms, new racial subjects?’


Published: Sep 22, 2016 by Ethnic and Racial Studies
Authors: V.Redclift
Subjects: Sociology & Social Policy, Anthropology - Soc Sci, Asian Studies

The articles in this volume reflect upon a very specific moment in the social architecture of British society: a moment that brings financial meltdown together with some sizeable shifts in the racial and ethnic landscape of the UK. As a ‘neo-liberal revolution’ heralds the end of public services and the end of the welfare state, it proclaims ‘the end of race’ as well.

Global Networks

‘Displacement, integration and identity in the postcolonial world’


Published: Sep 22, 2016 by Global Networks
Authors: V.Redclift
Subjects: Sociology & Social Policy, Anthropology - Soc Sci, Asian Studies

Using the case of the displaced ‘Urdu-speaking minority’ in Bangladesh, the article argues that the language of ‘integration’ is embedded in colonial narratives of ‘population’ versus ‘people-nation’ which structure exclusion not only through language and ethnicity, but poverty and social space. The voices of minorities navigating claims to belonging through these discourses sheds light on the shifting landscape of national belonging and the complicated accommodations required.