Donald  Joralemon Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Donald Joralemon

Professor
Smith College

Donald Joralemon has published on Peruvian shamanism, organ transplantation, medical ethics and end of life issues. He is the co-author, with Douglas Sharon, of Sorcery and Shamanism: Curanderos and Clients in Northern Peru (1993). Most of his work on organ transplantation appears in bioethics journals. His new book is Mortal Dilemmas: The Troubled Landscape of Death in America (2016). The fourth edition of his textbook, Exploring Medical Anthropology, is in print.

Biography

Donald Joralemon, Professor of Anthropology at Smith College (Northampton, Massachusetts, USA) has published on Peruvian shamanism, organ transplantation, medical ethics and end of life issues.   He is the co-author, with Douglas Sharon, of  Sorcery and Shamanism: Curanderos and Clients in Northern Peru (1993).  He won the Polgar Prize from the Society for Medical Anthropology for his article, “Organ Wars: The Battle for Body Parts” (1995).  Most of his work on organ transplantation appears in bioethics journals, including his co-authored (with Phil Cox) article “Body Values: The Case Against Compensating for Transplant Organs” in The Hastings Center Report (2003).  His article, “Dying While Living: the Problem of Social Death,” is in the edited collection Our Changing Journey to the End (2014) and “Ordering Chaos: The Process of Remembering Mass Murder,” was published in Mortality (2015). His new book is Mortal Dilemmas: The Troubled Landscape of Death in America (2016).  The fourth, heavily revised edition of his very successful textbook, Exploring Medical Anthropology, will be published in spring 2017.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Medical Anthropology
    Thanatology
    Medical Ethics
    Shamanism

Personal Interests

    Kayaking, dogs, hiking

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Mortal Dilemmas - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Mortality

Ordering Chaos: The Process of Remembering Mass Murder


Published: Feb 18, 2017 by Mortality
Authors: Donald Joralemon
Subjects: Health and Social Care, Anthropology - Soc Sci

The history of public memorials to the collective loss of life, whether related to military engagements or acts of terrorism, is characterized by passionate debate and intense disagreements over what and how to remember. A comparative analysis of the way these memory sites have been created in the United States reveals much about the meaning of the dead and the purpose of remembering.