Emily Ying Yang  Chan Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Emily Ying Yang Chan

Professor and Assistant Dean
Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Emily serves as Professor and Assistant Dean (Development) at Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is also Associate Director (External Affairs and Collaboration) at JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Director at Centre for Global Health (CGH) and Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC).

Biography

Emily serves as Professor and Assistant Dean (Development) at Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is also Associate Director (External Affairs and Collaboration) at JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Director at Centre for Global Health (CGH) and Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC). In 2016, CCOUC was recognised as International Centre of Excellence in Health and Community Resilience (ICoE-CCOUC) of Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR, a joint research programme of International Council for Science (ICSU), International Social Science Council (ISSC) and United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR)) and Emily has assumed ICoE-CCOUC directorship since then. She concurrently serves as Visiting Professor (Public Health Medicine) at Oxford University Nuffield Department of Medicine, Senior Fellow at Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and Visiting Scholar at FXB Center in Harvard University, and Honorary Professor at Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong. Emily is Co-chairperson of World Health Organization Thematic Platform for Health Emergency & Disaster Risk Management Research Group (WHO H-EDRM Research Group), member of Asia Science Technology and Academia Advisory Group of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR ASTAAG) and consultant in various technical consultation capacities for World Health Organization (WHO).

Awarded the 2007 Nobuo Maeda International Research Award of the American Public Health Association, Emily has published more than 200 international peer-reviewed academic/technical/conference articles and seven of these appeared in The Lancet and Bulletin of the World Health Organization. Her community public health resilience and disaster-health related papers have been used as policy references within the WHO and the Health Emergency Response Office of China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission.

Emily has been involved in professional technical public health specialist training programmes of the Hong Kong SAR Government (2011-present), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC) (2013-2015) and the Health Emergency Response Office of China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission (2013-2015). In addition, through the CCOUC China Ethnic Minority Health Project (EMHP) she established in 2009, her team has outreached almost 6,600 households in 23 remote, disaster-prone, resource-deficit rural settings in China and trained nearly 400 students and scholars from CUHK, HKU, Oxford University and Harvard University. Emily has also established research and training projects in Bhutan and Nepal. Moreover, the international online course “Public Health Principles in Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response” developed by her team to examine the application of public health principles in planning and responding to disaster and humanitarian crises has more than 4,000 students enrolled from six continents since its launch in May 2014.

Emily has extensive experience in serving as frontline emergency relief practitioner in the mid-1990s that spans across 20 countries. She was recognised as Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World (Junior Chamber International, 2005), Caring Physicians of the World (World Medical Association, Geneva, 2005), Leader of the Year 2015 (Community Service/Public Affairs/Environment and Conservation; Sing Tao News Corporation, 2016), and National Geographic Chinese Explorer (National Geographic Magazine, since 2016).

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Disaster and humanitarian medicine
    Climate change and health
    Global and planetary health
    Violence and injury epidemiology
    Remote and rural health
    Implementation and translational science
    Health needs and programme impact evaluation
    Evidence-based medical and public health interventions in resource deficit settings

Personal Interests

    Collecting books and maps
    Photography
    Travelling for both work and leisure purposes

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Public Health Humanitarian Responses Natural Disasters: Chan - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

PLOS Currents Disasters

Socio-demographic Predictors for Urban Community Disaster Health Risk Perception


Published: Jun 27, 2016 by PLOS Currents Disasters
Authors: Chan EY, Yue J, Lee P, Wang SS
Subjects: Health and Social Care

This research paper investigates the rates and predictors of disaster risk perception, awareness and preparedness, at individual and household levels.

Journal of Immigrants and Minority Health

Is previous disaster experience a good predictor for disaster preparedness in...


Published: Jun 01, 2014 by Journal of Immigrants and Minority Health
Authors: Chan EYY, Kim JH, Lin C, Cheung EYL & Lee PPY
Subjects: Health and Social Care

Disaster preparedness is an important preventive strategy for protecting health and mitigating adverse health effects of unforeseen disasters. This paper studies if previous disaster experience significantly increases household disaster preparedness levels in remote villages in China. It is based on the Ethnic Minority Health Project to examine health and disaster preparedness related issues in remote, rural, disaster prone communities in China.

The Lancet

Typhoon Haiyan and beyond


Published: Dec 07, 2013 by The Lancet
Authors: Chan EY, Liu S, Hung KK
Subjects: Health and Social Care

This paper examines the health impact of Super Typhoon Haiyan striking the Philippines in 2013. It concludes that how to mobilise community volunteers to engage in evidence-based post-disaster health actions remains a major operational challenge for governments, front-line workers, and academics, and gaps in technical knowledge must be tackled.

Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Hospital admissions as a function of temperature, weather phenomena and...


Published: Aug 01, 2013 by Bulletin of the World Health Organization
Authors: Chan EY, Goggins WB, Yue JSK, Lee P
Subjects: Health and Social Care

This study explores the relationship between weather phenomena and pollution levels and daily hospital admissions (as an approximation to morbidity patterns) in Hong Kong in 1998–2009. It finds that hospitalizations rise during extreme temperatures and suggests that public health interventions should be developed to protect children, the elderly and other vulnerable groups from excessive heat and cold.

Nature Geoscience

Bottom-up disaster resilience


Published: May 01, 2013 by Nature Geoscience
Authors: Chan EYY

This paper examines the potential of bottom-up disaster resilience building, using the case of 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China to highlight some of the successes of government-led schemes to mitigate the impact of natural disasters. It concludes that a stronger focus on individuals and local communities could reduce losses even further in the future.

Photos