Salvatore G Garofalo Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Salvatore G Garofalo

Adjunct Professor
City University of New York at Queens College

Salvatore Garofalo is a Lecturer for CUNY at Queens College. He specializes in teaching courses in technology to increase knowledge acquisition. His research interests integrate the development of scientific thinking across knowledge domains. He has worked intensely on evaluating the policy implications of standards on curriculum, assessment, and instruction. Currently, he is working on the development of spatial thinking with an emphasis on the impact of technology on cognitive functioning.

Biography

Salvatore Garofalo is a Lecturer for The City University of New York at Queens College. He specializes in teaching courses in technology and cloud-based applications to increase knowledge acquisition. His research interests integrate the development of scientific thinking across knowledge domains of biology and chemistry. He has worked intensely on evaluating the policy implications of standards on curriculum, assessment, and instruction. Currently, he is working on the development of spatial thinking from birth through adulthood with an emphasis on the impact of technology on cognitive functioning.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Integration of Science Education with Technology, Research Methods in STEM Education, and the Relationship of Cognitive Development and Spatial Thinking

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Spatial Intelligence *Ness & Farenga* - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

SAGE

Repositioning science reform efforts: Four practical recommendations from the fi


Published: Jun 03, 2016 by SAGE
Authors: Daniel Ness, Stephen J Farenga, Vishal Shah, Salvatore G Garofalo

In this article, the authors examine the research on reform efforts in science education and several past science education reform initiatives, which are then placed in the context of the time when each was endorsed and sanctioned. Based on unifying strands of inquiry regarding past science education reform efforts, the authors conclude with four general recommendations for progressive reform that are believed to be beneficial to authentic science learning experiences.