Aakash  Singh Rathore Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Aakash Singh Rathore

Director (IRNRD)
Professor, author & Ironman triathlete

Aakash Singh Rathore is a philosopher of international repute, author of 8 books, regular contributor to media, and India’s No.3 Ironman triathlete. He has taught at Jawaharlal Nehru University, Universities of Delhi, Rutgers, Penn, Toronto, Humboldt Berlin and LUISS Rome. He is International Fellow, ETHOS, Rome, and was Fellow, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla. He manages 3 major book series, and has authored/edited 20 books on political philosophy, law, literature, sports and wine.

Biography

Aakash Singh Rathore is a philosopher of international repute, author of eight books (including
A Philosophy of Autobiography: Body & Text, 2019), regular contributor to The Indian Express and Outlook magazine with bylines in The Times of India, Firstpost, Huffington Post, The Quint, and Scroll.in. He is also India’s number 3 Ironman triathlete, and has finished five gruelling Ironman Triathlons, known as the world’s most difficult one-day sporting event. He has featured on Asia News Network, News18, The Caravan, Pragati podcast, and NDTV 24X7.

​Rathore has taught at Jawaharlal Nehru University, the Universities of Delhi, Rutgers, Pennsylvania, Toronto, Humboldt Berlin, LUISS-Rome, and O.P. Jindal Global University. He is International Fellow of ETHOS, Rome, and Fellow at the Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla.

He is the Series Editor of Rethinking India (14 vols, Penguin/Vintage, forthcoming 2019-20) and editor of its first volume, Vision for a Nation: Paths and Perspectives​ (with Ashis Nandy). His 20 authored and edited books range from political philosophy, law, and religion to literature, sports, and wine. He is the Series Editor of Ethics, Human Rights and Global Political Thought (Routledge) and Religion and Democracy: Reconceptualizing Religion, Culture, and Politics in Global Context ​(Oxford University Press). Among his forthcoming solo works are Ambedkar's Preamble: A Secret History of the Constitution of India (Vintage/Penguin, 2020) and a radical study on Mind and Muscle. He is also Chief Editor, B. R. Ambedkar: The Quest for Justice (5 vols, Oxford University Press, 2020), and the author of B. R. Ambedkar: A Definitive Biography (Macmillan, forthcoming).

Rathore has spoken at The Times of India Delhi LitFest and other literature festivals in India and abroad, and appeared as a panelist on NDTV’s Conversations of the Constitution over two days of live sessions. He serves as advisor to several policymakers, thinktanks, educational and political bodies. He has delivered numerous talks, lectures, conferences, workshops and courses throughout India and abroad and has published over 50 journal papers. Rathore’s books have been reviewed and featured in Scroll.in, The Wire, Outlook, Caravan, EPW, The Hindu, The Indian Express, The Tribune, and numerous other popular print and online media. His Hegel’s India (Oxford University Press, 2017) was nominated for the TATA LITERATURE LIVE! AWARDS 2017 Book of the Year (non-fiction) and widely reviewed.

A social media influencer with over 36,000 Quora followers (of a blog on intersections between philosophy and physical culture: Mind & Muscle), 8,000 Instagram followers, 65,000 Twitter followers, and a YouTube channel with over 1,00,000 views, he engages with civil society, centres, universities, institutes at large as well as with academics, students, researchers, political workers and grassroots activists alike.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Philosophy, politics, India studies, caste, society, religion, law, phenomenology, psychology, classical and modern languages, literature, physical culture.

Personal Interests

    Physical culture, philosophy, law, politics, phenomenology, psychology, classical and modern languages, literature, oenology, music, theatre, art, performance, cinema, design, architecture, carpentry, wine making and beer brewing.

Websites

Books

Articles

The Caravan

Interview with Aakash Singh Rathore on Rethinking India book series


Published: Dec 15, 2019 by The Caravan
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, History, Sociology, Asian Studies

An articulation of the ideals of the Left, drawn from the Indian constitution, is needed to present a counter to the Right.

The Quint

Dr BR Ambedkar, Not Nehru, Gave Us the Preamble to Constitution


Published: Dec 06, 2019 by The Quint
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, History, Asian Studies

Although Dr Bhim Rao Ambedkar is universally regarded as the chief architect of the Constitution, the specifics of his role as chairman of the Drafting Committee are not widely discussed. Totally neglected is his almost single-handed authorship of the Constitution's Preamble, which is frequently and mistakenly attributed to B.N. Rau rather than to Ambedkar. Pt Jawaharlal Nehru is also accredited as the author of the Preamble.

Outlook

[email protected]: The Man Who Saw Mahatma’s Fangs


Published: Oct 07, 2019 by Outlook
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, History, Asian Studies

Gandhi and Ambedkar may be forever irreconcilable, ­irrespective of so many recent attempts to reconcile them. Ambedkar himself remained unconvinced of any change in Gandhi’s position, despite the evidence that certain scholars have proffered to show that Gandhi moved closer to his position in the last years of his life.

The Book Review

India’s Epic Adventures in Peaceful Coexistence


Published: Sep 08, 2019 by The Book Review
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Literature, Sociology

A Review of Rethinking Pluralism, Secularism and Tolerance: Anxieties of Coexistence by Neera Chandhoke: What is so impressive about it, in addition to the perfection of the grounding of theory in fact and the interweaving of literature and philosophy into a crisp and clear normative political theory, is, more generally, the way that it holds up a mirror to ourselves.

Outlook

The Strongest Constitution


Published: Aug 21, 2019 by Outlook
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: History, Media and Cultural Studies, Sociology & Social Policy, Art & Visual Culture

A quirky compendium of cartoons and the accompanying detailed commentary spark a bumpy ride to the past, and elicits doubts, thoughts and insights. With over 122 cartoon images culled from archives, it is a feast for the eyes.

The Indian Express

In Good Faith: The Divine Patriarchy


Published: Jul 29, 2019 by The Indian Express
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality, Religion, Sociology, Philosophy, Anthropology - Soc Sci, Gender & Intersectionality Studies, Art & Visual Culture

Feminist theologians have long held that male depictions of gods serve to reinforce patriarchy. This elicits the question: Do goddesses serve in any way to subvert patriarchy?

Firstpost

India and the Indian: Will we never be able to achieve consensus on being legitimately Indian


Published: Jun 29, 2019 by Firstpost
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Sociology & Social Policy, Asian Studies, Social Psychology

Can ‘cold’ constitutional values like fraternity, secularism, liberty ever quell the rage that hatred and nationalism have fomented on the streets, and chill this propensity toward violence? Without reclaiming and disseminating these ideas, we will continue to be swept away by the exclusivistic sense of the nation, which we, in our fear and weakness, are permitting to define who gets to be a bona fide Indian — always with tragic consequences.

Outlook

Seen Through Different Glasses


Published: Jun 12, 2019 by Outlook
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Sociology & Social Policy, Asian Studies

A controversial introduction to Annihilation of Caste reappears as a book. It reflects the elite Left’s opportunistic appropriation of Ambedkar.

Outlook

Tone Down His Piercing Stare


Published: Jun 06, 2019 by Outlook
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Sociology & Social Policy, Asian Studies

Ambedkar’s inherently radical sharpness was blunted by the state to co-opt Dalits. This book promises to be a whetstone but reneges on it.

Scroll.in

Why Autobiographies are the Most Potent Books to Challenge What is ‘Normal’


Published: May 05, 2019 by Scroll.in
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Literature, Media and Cultural Studies, Sports and Leisure, Philosophy

Why autobiographies are the most potent books to challenge what is ‘normal’. The author of a book on the philosophy of autobiography writes why it’s a truly unique form of literature.

Outlook

Ways of Holding the Chin Up


Published: Mar 27, 2019 by Outlook
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Literature, Sociology & Social Policy

To break millennia-old oppression, violence is a useful tool, says Awad. His life’s fight for Dalit rights is a fight to install equality in their minds. Taking autobiography as a universal literary form, rare achievements like Strike a Blow to Change the World are masterworks of the genre.

The Indian Express

The Flesh Made Word


Published: Jan 14, 2019 by The Indian Express
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Literature, Philosophy

In A Philosophy of Autobiography: Body & Text, I look at the autobiographies of iconic men and women (Nietzsche, Gandhi, Ambedkar, Maya Angelou, Ernest Hemingway, Elie Wiesel, Daya Pawar, Kamala Das, Yukio Mishima, Andy Warhol, and others). They depict the relationship between flesh and spirit in their experience and understanding.For that is what autobiographical writing in essence is, the transubstantiation of flesh into words that convey the spirit.

Outlook India

Muck and Dung in Furioso


Published: Oct 10, 2018 by Outlook India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Literature, Sociology, Asian Studies

Like Ambedkar, Bagul rudely tears off the romantic veil from villages and depicts a ruthless system of exploitation, indignities and hopeless rebellion. A review of Baburao Bagul’s 'Jevha Mi Jaat Chorli Hoti' (When I Hid My Caste), translated into English by Jerry Pinto.

The Indian Express

Plato and Sophists: Arguments for the Weak


Published: Aug 06, 2018 by The Indian Express
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Literature, Theater, Philosophy, Classical Studies, Art & Visual Culture

Sophists, decried thanks to Plato, may have been the first social reformers. I explore the intriguing conspiracy in my book 'Plato's Labyrinth' (2017).

Outlook India

Twin Cankers of the Nation


Published: Jul 25, 2018 by Outlook India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Religion, Sociology, Asian Studies

Neo-liberal Hindutva should be met by reformed Ambedkarists and Marxists in a fight to destroy caste and class, says Anand Teltumbde in his brilliant new book, Republic of Caste (2018).

The Indian Express

In Good Faith: The Task for the Political Philosopher


Published: May 28, 2018 by The Indian Express
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies

Political philosophers in India have been led toward the task of cultivating an authentic and vibrant Indian political philosophy. But what does this signify — what, exactly, is Indian political philosophy? This is the question that I have taken up in my recent book, 'Indian Political Theory: Laying the Groundwork for Svaraj' (2017).

The Indian Express

In Good Faith: Haunted by the Indian Spirit


Published: Jan 15, 2018 by The Indian Express
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: History, Literature, Religion, Philosophy, Asian Studies

Hegel wrote more about India than about the Greek world, exploring points of convergence and difference. An extract from my book 'Hegel's India: A Reinterpretation, with Texts' (co-authored with Rimina Mohapatra, 2017) that was nominated as the Book of the Year 2017 (Nonfiction), Tata Literature Live.

The Times of India

The Kafkaesque Character of Our Public Universities


Published: Nov 22, 2017 by The Times of India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Education, Literature, Sociology & Social Policy, Area Studies, Asian Studies, Urban Studies

What I have consistently experienced at public universities in India is a failure arising from a deficiency not in our purse but in our personnel. This perpetuates a vicious cycle that affects not only our personnel but also – given the economic impact of the brain drain that results from and itself perpetuates this vicious cycle – our purse and even our very ability to see the situation for what it is, for how baroque and insidious it really is.

Asia News Network

FEATURE: Indian nationalists doing disservice to patriotism, says think-tank expert


Published: Sep 18, 2017 by Asia News Network
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore and Lamat R. Hasan
Subjects: History, Sociology & Social Policy, Asian Studies

In an interview to Asia News Network, Aakash Singh Rathore explains the “rampant contradictions between actual economic and political practices versus the espoused rhetoric and ideology”. Rathore believes we need to redirect the gaze of Indian political theory back upon the lived experiences of Indian political life – also the subject matter of his book “Indian Political Theory: Laying the Groundwork for Svaraj” (Routledge, 2017).

Political Theology

Book Preview – Cultivating A New Indian Political Theory


Published: Jun 01, 2017 by Political Theology
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: History, Sociology & Social Policy, Asian Studies

I put forward a workable contemporary ideal of thin svaraj, i.e., political, and free of metaphysical commitment. The model is inspired by B.R. Ambedkar’s thoughts, as opposed to the thick conception found in the works of M.K. Gandhi, S.N. Balagangadhara, and others.The true challenge lies in carving out a space for authentic autonomy in indigenous or native theory that does not get immediately filled in by “fundamentalist” thought.

Huffington Post India

How to Save our Public Universities from Bureaucrats


Published: May 24, 2017 by Huffington Post India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Education, Sociology & Social Policy

Philosophy is a public good. Within the distributive model of justice, public goods should be equitably distributed, and it is only through properly functioning institutions that a just distribution of goods is accomplished. Are our public universities properly functioning institutions?

Huffington Post India

The Linguistic Incompetence of Today's Philosophers in India


Published: Apr 24, 2017 by Huffington Post India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Language Learning, Philosophy

The linguistic incompetence of today's philosophers in India: we are allowing, even encouraging, mediocrity instead of excellence. But as students of philosophy evolve into research students, doctoral candidates, and specialists, it becomes increasingly important toward the success of the philosopher that s/he should have more direct and authentic access to the writings s/he is aiming to be specialist of, and not through mere translations.

Huffington Post India

Indian Academia's Shunning of Ambedkar


Published: Apr 04, 2017 by Huffington Post India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Education, Sociology & Social Policy, Philosophy, Asian Studies, Social Psychology

Indian academia's shunning of Ambedkar reeks of social exclusion. Why is he untouchable by the standards of philosophy departments? Ambedkar, the philosopher: this is not a problem deriving from a lack of source material; this is not a problem deriving from limited resources—temporal, financial, administrative—within the discipline of academic philosophy; it is at bottom a social problem.

Firstpost

The 250-crore Necropolis


Published: Mar 05, 2017 by Firstpost
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Education, Philosophy

With what is possibly the richest philosophical heritage in the world, we have to assume that a lack of financial support from the government is an incomplete explanation for the profoundly pathetic state of philosophy in India today.

The Times of India

Dubai Ironman 70.3


Published: Feb 20, 2017 by The Times of India
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Sports and Leisure, Sport Psychology

26 January, the Dubai skyline appeared futuristic, bathed in the glow of the Burj Khalifa, lit up toe to dizzying tip in brilliant tri-colour to celebrate India’s Republic Day. I marveled at it, along with two other Indian athletes who came to Dubai to compete in the Ironman 70.3.

Scroll.in

From Philosopher to Ironman


Published: Dec 13, 2016 by Scroll.in
Authors: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Sports and Leisure, Sport Psychology

In September, Aakash Singh Rathore, formerly a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Delhi, finished the gruelling Ironman triathlon – known as the world’s most difficult one-day sporting event. The Ironman consists of a 3.86 km swim in open water (lake, river, or ocean), a 180.25 km bicycle ride, followed up by running a full marathon (42.20 km), raced in that order and without rest within 16 hours. This article reveals how and why he took on the world’s toughest triathlon.

News18.com

Meet Aakash Singh Rathore - an Indian Ironman and a JNU Professor


Published: Aug 08, 2016 by News18.com
Authors: News18.com
Subjects: Sports and Leisure, Sport Psychology

Every year at various venues around the world, thousands of ambitious and athletic men and women gather with nervous expectation, and pumped with adrenaline, at the starting line of the world's toughest triathlon, the Ironman. On July 31st, the IRONMAN 70.3 was held in Ecuador, at the port city of Manta. Dr. Aakash Singh Rathore, age 45, was there to represent India.

Photos

News

Rethinking Pluralism in India: A panel discussion

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Political Science, Politics & International Relations, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

Samruddha Bharat’s second Manthan discussion on “Rethinking Pluralism in India” (8 August 2019, India Islamic Cultural Centre) with:

1. Shri Hamid Ansari (India’s former Vice President);

2. Shri Sitaram Yechury (General Secretary, CPI-M);

3. Prof. Neera Chandoke (Political Theorist & Author);

4. Prof. Aakash Singh Rathore (Political Philosopher & Author);

5. Shri Gurdeep Sappal (CEO, Swaraj Express);

6. Shri Pushparaj Deshpande (Director, Samruddha Bharat)

Author Q&A with Aakash Singh Rathore

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Philosophy

Author Q&A with Aakash Singh Rathore

Aakash Singh Rathore, is the author of the recently released title, Indian Political Theory: Laying the Groundwork for Svaraj. An interesting new interpretation of a contemporary ideal of svaraj, this analysis takes into account influences from other cultures and sources as well as eschews thick conceptions that stifle imaginations and imaginaries.

We caught up with Aakash to discuss this exciting new title...

Aakash Singh Rathore, Author of Indian Political Theory - Singh Rathore

Aakash Singh Rathore is a professor, author and an Ironman triathlete. He is Visiting Professor at the Centre for Philosophy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India and Director of the International Research Network for Religion and Democracy (www.irnrd.org). 

He is also an International Fellow of the Center for Ethics and Global Politics in Rome, Italy. 

 

 

1. Congratulations on the publication of your book (Indian Political Theory)! What led you to write it?

I have planned to write this book since 2010, the year I published its predecessor, Indian Political Thought—A Reader (Routledge). That anthology showed the need for a dedicated monograph on the topic.

2. Can you describe your book in one sentence?

My book lays out the current field of indigenous Political Theory in India and suggests the most adequate methodology for its future direction. 

3. What makes your book stand out from its competitors?

What really makes my book stand out is that there are no competitors! This is the first and only book that exhaustively covers the terrain of contemporary (that is, living) Indian political theory and theorists.

4. Did anything take you by surprise or was completely new when researching the book?

The analogy between the ancient Indian idea of pratyahara and the ancient Greek notion of epoche was a pleasant surprise for me.

To be honest, the review of all the existing literature surprised me, in that I discovered how many ways the status quo can be reformulated – there are very few books with innovative solutions such as I offer.

5. Are there any relevant world issues that your book relates to at the moment?

All non-western countries are increasingly oriented toward nativism in Political Theory. Even in the process of democratization (as during the Arab Spring), the resurgence of fundamentalism (or, in India, of Hindu nationalism), is constant. This book addresses a methodology that is useful for the entire Global South. It pursues svaraj (authentic nativism) in a fully democratic vein without the threat of nationalism and fundamentalism. 

6. What sparked your particular interest in area of study?

All of my interest in the topic began by reading Bhikhu Parekh's essay, “The Poverty of Indian Political Theory”, and essay I took strong objection to and it goaded me on to produce 2 major books: both Indian Political Thought in 2010 (the reader that begins with the Parekh essay as the first chapter) and the present book, Indian Political Theory (2017).

The rise of nationalist and fundamentalist thought in the Global South shocks all social scientists. Very few solutions have been put forth. The uniqueness of this book is that it treats thoroughly of these developments.

7. How do you think the field of political thought is evolving today? What are some ongoing controversies?

The major controversy in social science throughout the entire Global South is about how to carve out a space for indigeneity and nativism/tradition without opening the doors to fundamentalism (or saffronization in India) and reactionary nationalism. My book provides a systematic answer.

8. What do you think is the future for political theory?

The discipline will continue to evolve, and the question is whether the centres of power (New York, Boston, London, Oxford) will diversify and pluralize, or will continue to be monolithic. As long as it is monolithic, then theory in the Global South will experiment with more and more types of nativism.

9. Tell us an unusual fact about yourself and your teaching.

It is certainly an unusual fact that I am an IronMan triathlete, and currently ranked number 2 in all of India. I am seeking to become number 1 for 2018.

A Thin Svaraj: Podcast

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, History, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

PODCAST  THE PRAGATI PODCAST

A Thin Svaraj

If Swaraj is your birthright, do you have it? What does Swaraj even mean? Do we have different concepts of self-rule? And how do we even spell the word — sva or swa?

Aakash Singh Rathore discusses his conception of ‘Thin Svaraj’ on Episode 58 of The Pragati Podcast.

Let My Nation Awake: Podcast

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

PODCAST  THE PRAGATI PODCAST

Let My Nation Awake

What does nationalism mean? How far has India come since 1947? What about the Indian nation gives you hope and despair?

On this special Independence Day Special of The Pragati Podcast, Nitin Pai and Dr Aakash Singh Rathore talk about the state of the Indian nation.

Indian Political Theory (Book Review - Political Theory)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

Book Review: Indian Political Theory: Laying the Groundwork for Svaraj, by Aakash Singh Rathore

Stuart Gray, Political Theory


‘Aakash Singh Rathore’s thoughtful book, Indian Political Theory: Laying the Groundwork for Svaraj, provides one of the most compelling versions of the first approach. . . . He defends a decolonial position and argues that pre-modern revivalist positions will inevitably privilege transitions of indigenous elites.’

Interpreting Hegel’s India (Book Review - Economic & Political Weekly)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, History, Philosophy and Religion, Religion, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

Interpreting Hegel’s India


‘A philosophical critique of Hegel will have to squarely confront this question, howsoever critical it may well be—and justifiably so—of Hegel’s specific historical, sociological, and politico-theoretical forays. After all, at stake in the latter is both the conceptualisation and expression of the modern condition in the shape of the free citizen (modern politics) having a human history as much as a “collective perfectibility.”’  

— Rahul Govind, Economic & Political Weekly


 

 

Indian philosophy, western perspective (Book Review - The Tribune)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

Indian philosophy, western perspective

Vijay Tankha


‘Hegel, as the authors in an excellent comprehensive introduction in the book show, wrote a great deal about India . . . While [they] offer a reinterpretation of Hegel’s writings on India, what is most compelling about this volume is reading an influential 19th-century thinker’s creation of the oriental outlook that was to dominate western scholarship and even fashion sustaining the self-image which many orientals imbibed under colonial rule.’

Giving Ourselves A Loud Voice (Book Review - Outlook)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies

Giving Ourselves A Loud Voice

Autonomy, or ‘svaraj’, in content/direction of political theory can’t be based on Western models, nor can the past provide it. Plunging into reality can.

 

Aakash Singh Rathore’s Indian Political Theory is a cry for a “svaraj in ideas”. Svaraj here is understood as autonomy and self-determination in both content and direction of political theory in India. There is some agreement among scholars in the non-Western world that political theory as it exi­sts today is primarily based on the experiences of (limited parts) the West and has no reference to the context, concerns or problems of societies markedly different. Rathore attempts to take this critique forward and his book is a brave attempt to re-found the discipline of Indian political theory.

Hegel’s India (Book Review - Marx & Philosophy Review of Books)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies

Marx & Philosophy Review of Books

Reviews

‘Hegel’s India: A Reinterpretation with Texts’

Reviewed by Karthick Ram Manoharan


‘Not only have Rathore and Mohapatra carefully collated Hegel’s writings on India, including translations of hitherto unfamiliar texts, in their brilliant reinterpretation of these writings, provide a justification, which is both sympathetic and critical, of Hegel’s engagement with India . . . Intellectuals and activists challenging entrenched casteism and the upsurge of Hindu fundamentalism in India will be eternally grateful for Hegel’s India.’


Hegel's Gita – A Philosopher Haunted by Indian Spirit (Book Extract - The Wire)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, Philosophy, Philosophy and Religion, Religion, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

Hegel's Gita – A Philosopher Haunted by Indian Spirit

An excerpt from Hegel's India: A Reinterpretation, about Hegel's little known writings on the Bhagvad Gita.

 

The Wire 


It is little known that the great teacher of Karl Marx, German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel, wrote extensively on the Gita. Hegel’s long two-part essay entitled, “On the Episode of the Mahabharata Known by the Name Bhagavad-Gita by Wilhelm von Humboldt” is a detailed critique of not only the Indological work of Humboldt, but also of the philosophical foundations and teachings of the Gita itself.

Hegel’s India (Book Review - IIC Quarterly)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: History, Philosophy, Philosophy and Religion, Religion, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

‘A book that speaks of and to the times . . . Hegel’s India makes Hegel both accessible and pertinent to the Indian reader who may be looking to constructively find distinctions between Indian philosophy, religious doctrine and hegemony.’  

Navtej Johar, IIC Quarterly

Autumn 2017
Volume 44, Number 2 


FEATURE: Indian nationalists doing disservice to patriotism

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, History, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

FEATURE: Indian nationalists doing disservice to patriotism, says think-tank expert

NEW DELHI (ANN Desk) - Global political theory is in a time warp, incongruous with the realities of global politics. Scholar-writer-teacher Aakash Singh Rathore presents a compelling case for why Indian political theory needs to redirect its gaze. 

India is becoming increasingly intolerant. Voices of dissent are being crushed, there is increasing surveillance, and the debates over the making and unmaking of India are becoming shrill. 

In an interview to Asia News Network, Aakash Singh Rathore, who teaches Philosophy, Politics and Law in India and abroad, and is director of International Research Network for Religion and Democracy, explains these “rampant contradictions between actual economic and political practices versus the espoused rhetoric and ideology”.

Rathore believes we need to redirect the gaze of Indian political theory back upon the lived experiences of Indian political life – also the subject matter of his newest book “Indian Political Theory: Laying the Groundwork for Svaraj” (Routledge, 2017).

Indian Philosophy and the Oriental Spirit (Book Review - The Book Review)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, History, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

Indian Philosophy and the Oriental Spirit

by Ajay Gudavarthy

 

‘This is an important book at a significant time. It makes some incisive points on how the Anglophone world has refused to, and continues to ignore, the contributions of “far-reaching philosophical systems” that arose outside the so-called western traditions.’

The land of desire: Hegel’s India (Book Review - Indian Express)

By: Aakash Singh Rathore
Subjects: Asian Studies, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice

The land of desire

Hegel’s India: A Reinterpretation with Texts

Edited by Aakash Singh Rathore and Rimina Mohapatra

 

Reading Hegel is always challenging. But an anthology of his work on India highlights how, even in his most prejudiced criticism, he could shine a light on unusual questions.

It is wonderful to have access to these writings in one volume. The introduction gives a tour d’horizon of the sources Hegel consulted and the interpretive controversies surrounding his work on India.


Written by Pratap Bhanu Mehta, The Indian Express

Videos

Philosophy of Law

Published: May 30, 2017

Aakash Singh Rathore discusses Queer Theory in relation to Jurisprudence: Queering Law

Aakash Singh Rathore speaks on Indian Political Theory

Published: May 30, 2017

Introduction to the Philosophy of Law

Published: May 30, 2017

Toward in Indian Philosophy of Law -- A New Approach to Jurisprudence in India

PLURILOGUE: Politics & Philosophy Reviews

Published: Sep 10, 2017

An introduction to the international journal 'Plurilogue' (www.plurilogue.com) by one of the editors (Aakash Singh Rathore). 'Plurilogue' is an online journal devoted to timely reviews of scholarly books, journal issues and articles in philosophy and political science. It is a repository for high-quality analyses of the newest scholarly research, with reviews authored by new and established scholars and refereed by members of an international editorial board.

Justice: John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin

Published: Sep 10, 2017

This lecture discusses the contributions of the two major political philosophers John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin to the theory of justice.