Jim  Davis Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Jim Davis

Professor of Musicology
State University of New York at Fredonia

Jim Davis is Professor of Musicology and Chair of the Music History Area at the School of Music, State University of New York at Fredonia. His primary research focuses on the music and musicians of the American Civil War. He has also worked in the areas of music history pedagogy, American popular music of the 19th and 20th centuries, and the history of bands.

Biography

Jim Davis is Professor of Musicology and Chair of the Music History Area at the School of Music, State University of New York at Fredonia.  His primary research focuses on military music and musicians, and in particular the American Civil War.  He has also worked in the areas of music history pedagogy, American popular music of the 19th and 20th centuries, and the history of bands.
Davis received a BS in Music from the University of Colorado at Denver with an emphasis in scoring and arranging; an MM in composition from the University of Texas; and a PhD in music history and theory from Boston University.
Davis has presented papers at regional and national meetings of the American Musicological Society, International Musicological Society, Society for American Music, College Music Society, Society for Ethnomusicology, Society for Military History, and Music Library Association. His research has been published in American Music, Popular Music & Society, College Music Symposium, Journal of Military History, Nineteenth Century Studies, Journal of the History of Ideas, Journal of Band Research, and the Journal of American Culture. His articles on pedagogy have appeared in Music Docta, International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Journal of Aesthetic Education, and Philosophy of Music Education Review.  

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    American Music, Military Music, 19th-Century Bands, Music and Musicians of the American Civil War, Music History Pedagogy

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - The Arts and Culture of the American Civil War - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Popular Music and Society

'Our War-Songs' (1864): Popular Song and Music Criticism during the American Civ


Published: Aug 07, 2017 by Popular Music and Society
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Music, Media and Cultural Studies

Popular music journalism during the American Civil War faced two primary challenges: how to talk about war songs objectively in the midst of war, and how to overcome an elitist attitude that focused on European concert music. Theodore Hagen’s “Our War-Songs” (1864) overcame both obstacles, avoiding superficial patriotism to provide a bipartisan and respectful examination of war songs while endorsing commercial song as a meaningful genre.

Musica Docta

"Music History Pedagogy on the Ground Floor"


Published: Jan 01, 2016 by Musica Docta
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Education, Music

This article urges musicologists to consider ways in which to connect with pre-collegiate education. Ideas presented include connecting with local schools and national teacher organizations, creating courses and workshops, and looking for ways our research might be presented to a broader audience. Extending our outreach promotes the health of our discipline and strengthens our presence in the face of financial setbacks and imposed curricular revisions.

College Music Symposium

“Union Musicians and the Medal of Honor During the Civil War"


Published: Jul 08, 2014 by College Music Symposium
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Military & Security Studies

Soldier-musicians of the American Civil War were often placed in situations that tested their courage, and many rose to the challenge, performing feats of gallantry that earned them the countries highest honor. This article identifies the 28 army musicians who were awarded the Medal of Honor for actions that included assisting the wounded, hazardous reconnaissance duty, seizing or defending a position or flag, leading an attack, and, in one special case, using music to turn the tide of battle.

American Music

"Music and Gallantry in Combat During the American Civil War"


Published: Jul 01, 2010 by American Music
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Music, Military & Security Studies

Two iconic aspects of the American Civil War - courage and music - joined together on the battlefield in ways both obvious and subtle. The colorful terminology and imagery found in these descriptions of battlefield performances suggest a peculiar link between the notes and the fighting, one more complex than merely providing an adrenaline boost with patriotic music.

Journal of Music History Pedagogy

"Classroom Discussion and the Community of Music Majors"


Published: Jan 01, 2010 by Journal of Music History Pedagogy
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Education, Music

Viewing the community in which these young musicians live and learn through the lens of ethnomusi¬cology helps to explain how music majors perceive their role in the classroom, which in turn sheds light on why they may or may not engage in classroom discourse. An awareness of the social and professional dynamics surrounding music majors can help instructors handle student responses in a way that promotes engaging discussion in the music history classroom.

Journal of Military History

"Musical Reconnaissance and Deception in the American Civil War"


Published: Jan 01, 2010 by Journal of Military History
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Music, Military & Security Studies

Firsthand accounts reveal that select officers and enlisted men drew upon the communicative potential of military music during battle. Scouts realized that field musicians and brass bands conveyed valuable information about the enemy position, while creative officers used both the connotative and denotative potential of music to enhance tactical deceptions. These occurrences affirm the intrinsic role that music played in the lives of nineteenth-century Americans.

International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

“Dialogue, Monologue, and Soliloquy in the Large Lecture Class"


Published: Jan 01, 2007 by International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
Authors: James A. Davis
Subjects: Education, Music

Large lecture sections are a necessary component of the college or university curriculum; however, many educators are frustrated by the potential ineffectiveness of their lecture presentations. Examining the theatrical concepts of dialogue, monologue and soliloquy provides teachers with a conceptual platform from which to evaluate their own modes of communication while also encouraging a mindset that promotes a more personal and productive environment in their classrooms.