Katerina  Maniadaki Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Katerina Maniadaki

Professor of Developmental Psychopathology
Athens University of Applied Sciences, Department of Social Work

I am a clinical child psychologist, expert on ADHD. I am a professor of developmental psychopathology and Head of the Department of Social Work at the University of West Attica. I am also the director of the Psychological Center for Developmental Disabilities "ARSI" in Athens. I have been working with children with ADHD and other developmental disorders since 1997.

Biography

Katerina Maniadaki, PhD, is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology and Head of the Department of Social Work at the University of West Attica. She has received her undergraduate degree in Philosophy, Pedagogy and Psychology from the University of Athens, her undergraduate degree in Psychology from the Université Louis Pasteur, her Master’s degree (D.E.S.S.) in Developmental Psychology from the Université René Descartes, and her PhD in Developmental Psychopathology on the subject of ADHD from the University of Southampton. Since 1996, she has been working as a clinical child psychologist at the Psychological Center “ARSI” in Athens. Her clinical and research interests include developmental psychopathology issues, mainly early identification, secondary prevention, and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. The main body of her work is on ADHD. She has published scientific books, edited collections, book chapters, and papers in Greek and international journals. She has presented more than 100 papers in scientific conferences and she is the coordinator of numerous training programs on ADHD for mental health professionals and educators. Her contribution in scientific research, culture, and humanity has been also recognized with the Universum Donna 2016 award from the international organization Universum Academy Switzerland.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    developmental psychopathology, childhood disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders, ADHD

Personal Interests

    Folc music, classical music, singing, theatre, writing

Websites

Books

Articles

Journal of Child Psychology

Editorial: Let’s talk about stuttering in a journal of child psychology


Published: Aug 29, 2017 by Journal of Child Psychology
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki

This paper is an editorial for a new journal of child psychology and it describes the author's views regarding the nature of stuttering, its close relationship with anxiety disorders and disordered beliefs and the clinical implications of this relationship.

Journal of Attention Disorders

Association between story recall and other language abilities in school children


Published: Jan 01, 2015 by Journal of Attention Disorders
Authors: Christina Papaeliou, Katerina Maniadaki and Efthymios Kakouros

The present study aimed to investigate the effect of working memory, vocabulary, and grammar on narrative comprehension in children with ADHD. It was shown that children with ADHD recall less information from the stories than did TD children, while they are less sensitive to the importance of the information they recall. Moreover, children with ADHD experience problems in answering factual questions.

Journal of Attention Disorders

Attention problems and learning disabilities in young offenders in detention


Published: Mar 05, 2012 by Journal of Attention Disorders
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki & Efthymios Kakouros

The aim of this study was to investigate the schooling history of young offenders detained in Greek Correctional Centers Schooling history of the young offenders was characterized by low attendance, high levels of dropouts, grade retention and academic failure. High co-existence of both psychosocial adversity and attention problems, indicating possible presence of ADHD, was found as well.

Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health

Social profiles and mental health problems of young offenders in detention


Published: Sep 19, 2008 by Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki & Efhtymios Kakouros

The aims of this study were to describe demographic and family characteristics of young incarcerated male offenders, to determine the prevalence of mental disorders and to compare native Greeks with immigrants on these variables. Results revealed over-representation of immigrants, high levels of psychosocial adversity (large family size, low parental educational level, poverty and family offending history) and high prevalence rates of externalizing disorders and internalizing disorders.

Early Child Development and Care

The relationship between ADHD and aggression in boys and girls


Published: Aug 18, 2006 by Early Child Development and Care
Authors: Efthymios Kakouros, Katerina Maniadaki, & Rania Karaba

This study explored prevalence rates of ADHD on a community‐based sample of preschoolers in Athens. Results revealed a prevalence rate of 14.3%, validating the existence of the disorder in preschoolers. Aggressive behavior was positively correlated with ADHD. Moreover, although girls without ADHD presented less aggressive behavior than boys, girls with ADHD displayed certain forms of aggressive behaviour more often than boys.

Journal of Child and Family Studies

ADHD symptoms and conduct problems: Similarities and differences.


Published: Jul 11, 2006 by Journal of Child and Family Studies
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki, Edmund Sonuga-Barke, Efthymios Kakouros & Rania Karaba

We compared maternal perceptions about ADHD behaviors and Conduct Problems (CPs), and the possible reactions elicited by such behaviors. The results showed that CPs were perceived as significantly more severe than ADHD behaviors. Moreover, ADHD behaviors were attributed to biological causes more often than CPs, and less strict rearing practices were chosen for ADHD symptoms. Mothers usually perceive ADHD behaviors and CPs as separate entities and may behave accordingly with their children.

Child: Care, Health and Development

Parental beliefs about the nature of ADHD behaviors


Published: Jun 15, 2006 by Child: Care, Health and Development
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki, Edmund Sonuga-Barke, Efthymios Kakouros, & Rania Karaba

This study compared beliefs of severity, impact and advice seeking for ADHD behaviors of parents whose preschool children present ADHD behaviors with those of parents whose children do not display such behaviours. Results showed that almost half of the parents who reported ADHD behaviors in their own child replied that they had never met a child exhibiting such behaviors. These parents also perceived such behaviors as being less severe and with less negative family impact.

European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Adults’ self-efficacy beliefs and referral attitudes for children with ADHD


Published: Apr 01, 2006 by European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki, Edmund Sonuga-Barke & Efthymios Kakouros

The aim of this study was to examine differences in mothers’ and educators’ self-efficacy beliefs and severity perceptions towards boys and girls with AD/HD their relationship to referral judgements. Mothers’ sense of self-efficacy was higher than educators’ and both samples had higher sense of self-efficacy towards girls with AD/HD than boys. Finally, perceived self-efficacy predicted severity perceptions and severity perceptions predicted referral decisions.

Child: Care, Health and Development

Parents’ causal attributions about Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder


Published: Apr 11, 2005 by Child: Care, Health and Development
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki, Edmund Sonuga-Barke, & Efthymios Kakouros

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of parent and child sex on parental causal attributions about ADHD and to investigate the interrelationships between these variables. Higher ratings of intentionality were conferred to boys than girls and these attributions were related to stricter responses towards boys. Parents who considered biological dysfunction as underlying ADHD, they mostly did so in the case of girls. Minimal effect of parent sex on causal attributions was found.

Child Psychiatry and Human Development

Maternal emotions and self-efficacy beliefs in relation to boys and girls with A


Published: Mar 09, 2005 by Child Psychiatry and Human Development
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki, Edmund Sonuga-Barke, Efthymios Kakouros, & Rania Karaba

This study examined the impact of child gender on mothers’ emotional responses to AD/HD, self-efficacy beliefs and perceived severity of ADHD. ADHD behavior elicited negative emotions and maternal self-efficacy was low, especially for male AD/HD. Perceived severity of the behavior was negatively correlated with maternal sense of self-efficacy. These findings suggest that mothers of “normal” children have fixed negative emotions and low sense of self-efficacy towards a child with ADHD.

Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

How Greek teachers perceive school functioning of pupils with ADHD


Published: Jan 05, 2004 by Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
Authors: Efthymios Kakouros, Katerina Maniadaki, & Christina Papaeliou

In this study teachers assessed school functioning in pupils with ADHD, combined (C), inattentive (IA) and hyperactive-impulsive (HI) subtypes and 26 controls. Results showed that C and IA pupils were evaluated as impaired in all areas of academic and social functioning. Inattentiveness and impulsivity had the strongest effect on academic functioning.

Child: Care, Health and Development

Trainee nursery teachers’ perceptions of disruptive behaviour disorders


Published: Oct 30, 2003 by Child: Care, Health and Development
Authors: Katerina Maniadaki, Edmund Sonuga-Barke, & Efthymios Kakouros

The aim of this study was to examine the role of gender-related expectations in the identification and referral of childhood Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs) by trainee nursery teachers. DBDs ascribed to girls were considered to be no more severe or of greater concern than those ascribed to boys. Judgements of severity were related to concern in the same way for boys and girls. However, DBDs were regarded as less typical for girls than boys.