George  Carayannopoulos Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

George Carayannopoulos


University of Sydney

Dr George Carayannopoulos holds a PhD and is the Head of the Higher Degree Research Centre at the University of Sydney. George has held a number of senior positions in higher education management and research development within the humanities and health and medical sectors. He has a background in policy development, analysis and evaluation. His research areas include: public policy collaboration, crisis management, interagency coordination and researcher development.

Biography

Dr George Carayannopoulos holds a PhD and is the Head of the Higher Degree Research Centre at the University of Sydney. George has held a number of senior positions in higher education management and research development within the humanities and health and medical sectors. He has a background in policy development, analysis and evaluation. His research areas include: public policy collaboration, crisis management, interagency coordination and researcher development.

In recent years he has presented at a number of conferences including: the 2017 Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authorities Council (AFAC) Conference and the 2016 International Research Society for Public Management (IRSPM) Conference.

He is currently a member of the Australian Research Training Network Advisory Board and also a member of the NSW Executive Committee of the Australian Research Management Society.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Public Policy, Crisis Management, Coordination and Researcher Development

Books

Articles

Australian Journal of Public Administration

Whole of Government: the Solution to Managing Crises?


Published: Feb 11, 2016 by Australian Journal of Public Administration
Authors: George Carayannopoulos

During the past decade, disaster events have had a significant impact on the relevant communities as well as raising questions regarding the role of government and the bureaucratic coordination of planning and response processes. These events have placed a renewed focus on the ability of governments to plan, prepare, and respond in an effective way to crises. They have also tended to indicate that there remain serious challenges to government coordination.