Andrew J. Cunningham Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Andrew J. Cunningham

Research Fellow
King's College London

Andrew has 23 years’ experience in the aid sector, including 14 years with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), ten years of which was in the field and 4 in HQ. Andrew’s specialty is in highly insecure contexts and civil society space in humanitarian crises. Since leaving MSF Andrew has completed his PhD in War Studies at King’s College London, where he is a Research Fellow. Andrew works as a consultant and trainer for humanitarian organisations and is a member of the Board of MSF Internation

Biography

Andrew Cunningham has twenty-three years’ experience in the humanitarian and development  field, beginning with working for the Peace Corps in Burundi 1989-1991 and then in the Rwandan refugee camps in Tanzania between 1994-1996. Following this he spent by fourteen years with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), ten years of which was in the field in a wide variety of contexts and geographical locations. Later he moved to the Amsterdam MSF headquarters to work in the Humanitarian Affairs Department where he collaborated on various projects related to the translation of humanitarian principles into viable humanitarian interventions. Andrew’s specialty in his MSF work was in highly insecure contexts, such as Chechnya, Afghanistan/Pakistan, and Somalia. Since leaving MSF Andrew has completed his PhD in War Studies at King’s College London, researching the relationship between states and international humanitarian organisations in the context of conflict. Andrew also has a BA in History from Keene State College, an MS in Applied Linguistics from Georgia State University, and an MSPH (Environmental Health Sciences) from Tulane School of Public Health. Andrew works as a consultant and trainer for various humanitarian organisations and is a member of the Board of MSF International. He is also a Research Fellow at the Conflict, Security and Development  Research Group at the War Studies Department, King's College London.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    The relationship between states and humanitarian and development NGOs.
    Civil society space in humanitarian contexts.
    Humanitarian principles and negotiated access.

Personal Interests

    The peace of gardening in an urban context.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - International Humanitarian NGOs & State Relations-Cunningham - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:9

Who is your constituency? The political engagement of humanitarian organizations


Published: Dec 01, 2017 by Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:9
Authors: Lockyear, C. and Cunningham, A.

How and with whom NGOs engage contributes to their identity and their ability to implement activities. The appropriateness of their political engagement, and the impact of such engagement on their identity, is frequently a source of confusion and contention within humanitarian organisations, particularly when it comes to consideration of the neutrality principle. This argues for the value of using the concept of constituency in analysing the political identity of a humanitarian organisation.

Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:7

Post-conflict contexts and humanitarian organizations: The changing relationship with states. Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:7


Published: Sep 01, 2017 by Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:7
Authors: Cunningham, A.

The operational space for humanitarian NGOs are conflicts. Post-conflict situations present far less clear-cut choices for humanitarian INGOs. This article queries whether humanitarian crises continue into post-conflict periods. A transition framework based on Koselleck’s definition of crisis is proposed to help organizations understand the war-to-peace, set against the literature on linking relief, rehabilitation, and development and Walter Benjamin’s conception of peace.

Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:4

Kidnapping and the limits of acceptance


Published: Jun 01, 2017 by Journal of International Humanitarian Action 2:4
Authors: Cunningham, A

For many humanitarian agencies, acceptance is the preferred security management tool. Humanitarian agencies have long been uncomfortable with the contradiction of using deterrence mechanisms in humanitarian operations. But in hyper-insecure contexts, is acceptance a viable option? This paper argues that in some contexts, the acceptance strategy no longer works. A ‘zone of exception’ framework is proposed based on the work of Carl Schmitt.

Disasters

Introduction: State sovereignty and humanitarian action


Published: Oct 01, 2013 by Disasters
Authors: Kahn, C. and Cunningham, A.

Introduction to the thematic of state sovereignty and humanitarian action