Neil  Dooley Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Neil Dooley

Lecturer in Politics
University of Sussex

Neil Dooley is a Lecturer in Politics at the University of Sussex, where he teaches European Union Politics and International Political Economy. His research on the crisis in the eurozone periphery appears in New Political Economy, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal. Neil's work has been published in The Washington Post, The Conversation, and Le Monde Diplomatique.

Biography

Neil Dooley is a Lecturer in Politics in the Department of Politics at the University of Sussex, where he teaches European Union Politics and International Political Economy. Neil's primary research interest concerns the origins and political impact of the eurozone crisis in peripheral states, particularly Portugal, Greece and the Republic of Ireland. Neil is also working on EU27 perceptions of Brexit and the consequences of Brexit for Ireland. His articles appear in New Political Economy, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal and his first book The European Periphery and the Eurozone Crisis: Capitalist Diversity and Europeanisation is published by Routledge’s RIPE Series in Global Political Economy. Neil's work has been published in The Washington Post, The Conversation, and Le Monde Diplomatique.  

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    The eurozone crisis; with specific focus on the cases of Portugal, Ireland and Greece.
    European and Comparative Political Economy.
    Brexit; Consequences of Brexit for Ireland/Northern Ireland
    Europeanisation
    European Union and European Studies
    Theorising capitalist diversity and divergence

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - The European Periphery and the Eurozone Crisis (Dooley) - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

New Political Economy

Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf? Rethinking the Core and Periphery in the Eurozone Crisis


Published: Nov 21, 2017 by New Political Economy
Authors: Neil Dooley

This article shows that core–periphery scholarship is unable to adequately challenge the immaturity thesis due to its preoccupation with German ‘victimisation’ of the European periphery. By exploring country-specific direction of trade and capital lending statistics, I shows that there is little basis for the argument that Germany is to blame for the origins of the eurozone crisis in the individual countries of the European Periphery.

Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal

Divergence via Europeanisation: rethinking the origins of the Portuguese debt crisis


Published: Sep 26, 2017 by Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal
Authors: Neil Dooley

This paper explores the ways in which negotiation of European integration has been generative of institutional transformation leading to debt-led growth in Portugal. By combining Europeanisation with CPE, this article shows that, far from an inability to do so, in the case of Portugal, it has been the attempt to ‘follow the rules’ of European Integration that explains its damaging patterns of debt-led growth.

Millennium: Journal of International Studies

Growing Pains? Rethinking the ‘Immaturity’ of the European Periphery


Published: Aug 05, 2014 by Millennium: Journal of International Studies
Authors: Neil Dooley

Recent literature on the eurozone crisis has begun to rethink those explanations of its origins that rely on narratives stressing the ‘immaturity’ of the peripheral European states. These narratives, found in political, media and scholarly discourses, represent states like Ireland, Portugal and particularly Greece as to varying degrees profligate, corrupt and generally lacking the mature, efficacious and responsible political culture necessary for prudent fiscal governance.