Glenda  Cooper Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Glenda Cooper

Lecturer in Journalism
City University of London

I'm a lecturer in journalism at City, University of London. I look at coverage of humanitarian disasters, the relationship between aid agencies and journalists and ethical issues surrounding use of user-generated content. Formerly I was the Guardian Research Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford and a staff journalist at the BBC, Independent, Daily Mail, Washington Post, Sunday Times and the Daily Telegraph.

Biography

Dr Glenda Cooper is a lecturer in journalism at City, University of London. Her research centres on humanitarian disasters, the relationship between aid agencies and journalists and the ethical issues surrounding use of user-generated content. She is the co-editor of Humanitarianism, Communications and Change (Peter Lang, 2015), and editor of The Future of Humanitarian Reporting (City University, 2014). Before that, she was the Guardian Research Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford and a staff journalist at the BBC, Independent, Daily Mail, Washington Post, Sunday Times and the Daily Telegraph.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Humanitarian Disaster reporting
    Relationships between aid agencies and journalists
    Ethics of use of UGC
    Aid agencies and the AidToo scandal

Personal Interests

    Outside academia I write plays and short stories. My most recent play looks at what would happen if the UK suffered a humanitarian disaster https://www.city.ac.uk/news/2018/september/aid-memoir-glenda-cooper

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Reporting Humanitarian Disasters in a Social Media Age; Cooper - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journalism Practice

“Our Relationship? It’s the Odd Mucky Weekend, Not a One Night Stand” Journalists and aid agencies in the UK, and the current challenges to sourcing in humanitarian disasters


Published: Dec 11, 2018 by Journalism Practice
Authors: Glenda Cooper

This paper draws on 40 semi-structured qualitative interviews with UK national journalists and aid agencies belonging to the UK's Disasters Emergency Committee to look at boundary (re)negotiations in journalism and the source-media relationship. It compares and contrasts what assistance journalists say they accept from aid agencies and what aid agencies report.

Interactions: Studies in Communication & Culture

Hurricanes and hashtags: How the media and NGOs treat citizens’ voices online in humanitarian emergencies


Published: Jan 07, 2015 by Interactions: Studies in Communication & Culture
Authors: Glenda Cooper

This article aims to answer how voices of citizens in crises are being mediated and mediatized, and what issues the use of this content raise around contextual integrity of privacy. It concludes by examining whether NGOs’ engagement online allows the voices of the marginalized to emerge.