Hania A.M. Nashef Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Hania A.M. Nashef

Professor
American University of Sharjah

Hania A.M. Nashef is a professor at the American University of Sharjah, UAE.Her publications include Palestinian Culture and the Nakba: Bearing Witness and The Politics of Humiliation in the Novels of J. M. Coetzee. She has also published a number of studies on the novels of J.M. Coetzee and José Saramago, published and presented on Palestinian literature, film and Arab film and media representations, and on the plays of Samuel Beckett.

Biography


Hania A.M. Nashef is a professor in the Department of Mass Communication at the American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. She has a Ph.D. in English Literature from University of Kent in the United Kingdom, a Master’s degree from Ohio State University in English Literature, and a Bachelor of Arts in English and French Literature also from OSU.  Prior to joining academic life, she worked in television in the UAE.

Her research interest is multidisciplinary, publishing on literature and media. Her publications have included articles on comparative, postcolonial/postmodern literature, media representations, and literary journalism.

Her most recent publication is Palestinian Culture and the Nakba: Bearing Witness (Routledge: 2019).  Her monograph The Politics of Humiliation in the Novels of J. M. Coetzee (2009) was also published by Routledge. Her publications also include a number of journal articles on J.M. Coetzee and José Saramago. She has also published on Palestinian literature, film, Arab media representations and virtuality.  She is currently working on literary journalism and film in the Arab world.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Postcolonial, comparative literature, film and media studies, literary journalism

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Palestinian Culture Nakba Nashef - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Prose Studies

Against a reading of a sacred landscape: Raja Shehadeh rewrites the Palestinian presence in Palestinian Walks


Published: Nov 24, 2020 by Prose Studies
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In his introduction to Palestinian Walks, Raja Shehadeh remarks that in spite of the great number of travelers to Palestine, travel literature, for the most part, willfully ignored the living experience and existence of the land’s inhabitants.The Biblical imagination, along with the orientalist gaze, informed the accounts. This vanishing homeland is a subject that dominates Shehadeh’s nonfiction narrative.

Quarterly Review of Film and Video

Giving a Face to the Silenced Victims: Recent Documentaries on Gaza


Published: Nov 11, 2020 by Quarterly Review of Film and Video
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Film and Video, Media and Cultural Studies, Middle East Studies, Art & Visual Culture

Often described as an open-air prison, the citizens of the Gaza Strip have long resisted a subaltern existence. Conditions in Gaza, and specifically since the Second Intifada of 2000, have increasingly worsened. A deafening silence by the world has resulted in a marked increase in documentaries. In these productions, Gazans convey their stories to the outside world and demand that their humanity is acknowledged.

Samuel Beckett Today / 2019 Aujourd’hui

“‘Nothing is Left to Tell’: Beckettian Despair and Hope in the Arab World"


Published: Oct 24, 2019 by Samuel Beckett Today / 2019 Aujourd’hui
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In the Arab world, Beckett’s plays or their adaptations have not only been popular with audiences and directors but have also inspired other literary and media genres. The Beckettian wait itself has become synonymous with the condition of the Arab person. In this paper, I discuss how in times of war, migrations, and despair, performances of Beckett’s plays abound.

Film International

“Coming of Age in Troubled Times: Son of Babylon and Theeb.”


Published: Jun 06, 2018 by Film International
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

In this article, I discuss two films that narrate the coming of age stories of two young boys during times of war. Through the eyes of these boys, we see countries and cultures unfolding. The first film is Jordanian director, Naji Abu Nowar’s debut film, Theeb (2014), set in 1916 in what is now southern Jordan, and Mohammed Al-Daradji’s film, Son of Babylon (2009). In both films, we witness not only boyhood journeys but also stories of countries that are yet to emerge.

 The Journal of Commonwealth Literature

Challenging the myth of “a land without a people”: Mahmoud Darwish’s Journal of an Ordinary Grief and In the Presence of Absence


Published: May 22, 2018 by The Journal of Commonwealth Literature
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In his address at the Madrid Peace Conference, the Head of the Palestinian Delegation challenged the persistent myth that has defined Palestinian existence for at least a century by saying: “For too long the Palestinian people have gone unheeded, silenced...we have been victimized by the myth of ‘a land without a people.’” Here, I look at Mahmoud Darwish’s Journal of an Ordinary Grief and In the Presence of Absence, drawing on Edward W. Said’s After the Last Sky.

 Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies

A dialogue beyond the nation-state: Darwish's Mural and Shehadeh's A Rift in Time: Travels with my Ottoman Uncle


Published: Jan 25, 2018 by Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

I look at two voices that resist abstraction and invisibility, through an analysis of two texts that are concerned with issues of shrinking and imposed identity, Mahmoud Darwish's poem Mural and Raja Shehadeh’s in A Rift in Time: Travels with My Ottoman Uncle.

Comparative Literature Studies

Ideal Cities-Marred Individuals: J. M. Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus and José Saramago's A Caverna


Published: Dec 22, 2017 by Comparative Literature Studies
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In the final pages of Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus and Saramago's A Caverna, the main protagonists flee to an unknown destination from their respective "utopias." Both allegorical novels expose the ills of two guarded and structured communities. Here, I compare how both authorities function under the pretext of creating the ideal world, which ultimately results in safeguarding their own interests, and consequently perpetuating the anesthetized existence of their citizens.

Angelaki Journal of the Theoretical Humanities

Homo Sacer dwells in Saramago’s land of exception: Blindness and The Cave


Published: Dec 10, 2017 by Angelaki Journal of the Theoretical Humanities
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

Giorgio Agamben defines the sacred man or Homo Sacer as one who is not worthy of sacrifice. In modern times, banishment or banning by the law occurs when a state of exception is sanctioned by a totalitarian supremacy that suspends judicial power. Here, I discuss how the authorities in José Saramago’s Blindness and The Cave function within the law of exception, confining and defining space, and ultimately marking the Homo Sacer.

Prose Studies History, Theory, Criticism

Two memories: Darwish and Shehadeh recount their days under siege


Published: Dec 30, 2016 by Prose Studies History, Theory, Criticism
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In the 2002 siege of Ramallah, a man asks an Israeli soldier storming his house, “Do you consider me a human being?” The quotation is from Raja Shehadeh’s When the Bulbul Stopped Singing. In 1987, Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish published Memory for Forgetfulness, documenting the 1982 Israeli invasion of Beirut. The pervading question in both works is who is human. I argue how these texts provide a counter-narrative as they resist the Homo Sacer status.

Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication

Virtuality and différance in the age of the hyperreal


Published: Dec 22, 2016 by Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media Communication

In this article, I argue how the pervasiveness of media, in the form of mobile phones, tablets with their applications and social networking sites, singularly or in unison create and sustain the existence of the hyperreal. They succeed at once through an imagined call for urgency and an implosion of meaning that cannot be contained.

Transnational Cinemas

Demythologizing the Palestinian in Hany Abu-Assad’s Omar and Paradise Now


Published: Nov 22, 2016 by Transnational Cinemas
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

This article examines two internationally acclaimed films by Palestinian director Hany Abu-Assad, Al Janna Al Aan/Paradise Now and Omar. In both, Palestinians hover between security walls, refugee camps and occupied space, as they deal with issues of betrayal, frustration, martyrdom and treason, portrayals that ultimately demythologize the Palestinian individual.

Orbis Litterarum

Specters of Doom Saramago's Dystopias in Blindness and The Cave


Published: Apr 13, 2015 by Orbis Litterarum
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

Although Plato's Utopia is the non‐place that holds the promise of perfection, it remains the place in which citizens are categorized by a rigid structure. José Saramago, on the other hand, introduces us to a dystopia in his novel Blindness, in which one event leads to the ruin of a city. Meanwhile, in The Cave, which reverberates with Plato's “Simile of the Cave,” Saramago provides an unrelenting criticism of a city's landscape

International Journal of Multilingualism

أهلا, hello and bonjour: a postcolonial analysis of Arab media’s use of code switching and mixing and its ramification on the identity of the self in the Arab world


Published: Aug 22, 2013 by International Journal of Multilingualism
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

Code switching is a practice exercised by multilingual speakers, and is prevalent in postcolonial countries in which the colonial language has continued to exist alongside the native language. In the past, code switching in the Arab world has been confined to a few; with the changes of media, its domain has grown to include a larger number of people. I partly look at the role of the Arab media and its effect on identity formation drawing on postcolonial theory.

Interventions International Journal of Postcolonial Studies

Disconcerting Images: Arab Female Portrayals on Arab Television


Published: Dec 22, 2012 by Interventions International Journal of Postcolonial Studies
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Mass Communications

In this essay I propose to argue that a detailed study of female representation on Arab television would reveal an immature and regressive medium, solely interested in commodifying and in enfeebling the Arab female. Moreover, an interpretive discourse with postcolonial theory and an analysis of what constitutes the Arab identity will reveal why such female representations persist.

Altre Modernità

Abu Ghraib and Beyond: Torture as an Extension of the Desiring Machine


Published: Dec 22, 2012 by Altre Modernità
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

Robert J.C. Young states that Colonialism “was not only a machine of war … but also a desiring machine.” This poses the question as to whether torture does allow for the enactment of repressed desire by allowing it to surface by providing it with a venue in which it becomes acceptable; in Abu Ghreib and Guantanamo, prisoners, not only, were subjected to physical abuse but were also subjected to acts of sexual perversion as was revealed by the photos.

Critical Studies on Terrorism

The blurring of boundaries: images of abjection as the terrorist and the reel Arab intersect


Published: Dec 22, 2011 by Critical Studies on Terrorism
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

In her treatise on abjection, Julia Kristeva argues that the abject is located outside the self, remaining in a state of repulsion that threatens to destroy the self. Abject representations are prevalent in the way terrorists have been portrayed in the Western news media post-September 11, 2001. These images of abjection are problematic, as they consolidate the images we have seen in Hollywood films representing Arabs.This article examines the point at which these issues intersect.

Global Media and Communication

The abject/the terrorist/the reel Arab – a point of intersection


Published: Dec 08, 2011 by Global Media and Communication
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies

This paper proposes that such portrayals have been successful in placing the Arab within the abject, a priori not human. Initially, the paper will outline the portrayal of the Arab in film, before examining the point at which the images of the reel Arab and the real terrorist interconnect through a study of a number of terrorist images vis-à-vis these reel portrayals, and ultimately show how the images of terrorists aired in the news media have not deviated from these preset stereotypes.

Comparative Literature Studies

Becomings in JM Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians and José Saramago's Blindness


Published: Dec 22, 2010 by Comparative Literature Studies
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In the first epigraph, the magistrate from J. M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians is describing his condition following his arrest and fall fromgrace, and in the second, the blind doctor from José Saramago’s novel Blindness is commenting on the state to which he has deteriorated. Fall from power or a change in status paves the way to the process of “becoming-animal," a term is employed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari.

Ariel: a review of international English literature

Baal and Thoth: Unwelcome Apparitions in J. M. Coetzee’s The Master of Petersburg and Disgrace


Published: Dec 22, 2010 by Ariel: a review of international English literature
Authors: Hania A.M. Nashef
Subjects: Literature

In this essay, I would like to discuss the roles of two mythological deities, Baal and Toth, that symbolically acquire the role of specters in Coetzee’s Te Master of Petersburg and Disgrace, respectively. In Coetzee’s novels, these ancient gods no longer assume their original mythical role, but instead evolve as premonitions of evil and death. I will also argue why the afore-mentioned oriental gods can only be perceived here as evil.