Michelle A Holling Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Michelle A Holling

Professor
California State University San Marcos

Dr. Holling is professor of the Department of Communication at CSUSM. Anchoring her commitment to social justice are matters of voice, marginality, and identity that guide her work in the academy. From a critical rhetorical approach, she examines matters of race, vernacular voices, [email protected] communication, and gendered violence that manifest in many scholarly articles, book chapters, and two co-edited books namely, Race(ing) Intercultural Communication and Latina/o Discourse in Vernacular Spaces.

Biography

Dr. Holling is professor and chair of the Department of Communication at California State University San Marcos. She earned an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Communication from Arizona State University and her M.A. and B.A. in Communication from San Francisco State University. Guiding her scholarly, teaching, and service commitments are matters of voice, marginality, and identity that anchor in a concern for and dedication to social justice. As a scholar, she critically examines matters of race, vernacular voices, and gendered violence. As a professor in the classroom, she creates and includes content that privileges voices that are often marginalized. As president of a regional association, she implemented structural changes that are a beginning, and not an end, to making the discipline of communication more sustaining for all communication scholars.

More specifically, questions of identity, ideology and hegemony, representations, and vernacular voices underlie Dr. Holling’s scholarship, which is theoretically informed by critical rhetorical scholarship, (womyn of color) feminist theory, Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x communication, and race. As a result, her research reflects four strands: gendered violence; academe as a site of inquiry to explore issues of identity and agency; race and identity in rhetorical discourse; Chicana/o vernacular rhetoric; and counter-hegemonic efforts and oppositional politics. She co-edited two books entitled Race(ing) Intercultural Communication, with Dreama Moon (Routledge); and Latina/o Discourse in Vernacular Spaces, with Bernadette Calafell (Rowman & Littlefield). As well, she published 18 scholarly articles and book chapters. Further, she serves on, currently or previously, multiple editorial boards within the field of communication and as ad-hoc reviewer for journals external to the field. Based on her scholarly contributions, she has been a Distinguished Scholar and Visiting Speaker at universities in the U.S. In addition, her publications resulted in Scholar of the Year Award by the Latina/o Communication Studies Division and La Raza Caucus of the National Communication Association in 2009. Her research on Chicano masculinity earned her the B. Aubrey Fisher Outstanding Journal Article by the Western States Communication Association in 2007.

Her teaching interests span rhetoric, gender, and Chicana/os. Specifically, she teaches rhetorical theory, rhetorical criticism, feminist rhetorics, argumentation and dialogue, gender and communication, and Chicana/os-Latina/os in film and television. Finally, she maintains a demonstrated history of service at all levels. In February 2018, she completed her term as President of the Western States Communication Association (WSCA). During her tenure, she was the primary program planner for the 88th annual convention, hosted Janaya Khan of #BlackLivesMatter as the keynote speaker; created the interest group Communication, Identities, and Difference; and drafted an anti-discrimination and diversity statement that guides the Association. Previously she served as President-Elect, First Vice-President, and Second Vice-President of the WSCA. She also served as President of the Organization for Research on Women and Communication, the only national feminist organization in the field of communication.  

Websites

Books

Articles

Southern Communication Journal

You Initimidate Me as a Microaggressive Controlling Image to Discipline Womyn of Color Faculty.


Published: Jan 08, 2019 by Southern Communication Journal
Authors: Michelle A. Holling
Subjects: Education, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies

This essay rectifies limitations in existing microaggression literature by theorizing a particular controlling image as microaggressive. A controlling image operating within the academy is “you’re intimidating,” which carries representational meanings about Others that seeks to discipline womyn of color faculty. The intersectional nature of the controlling image is mired in power and contextual factors that reflect a racial–gendered microaggression.

Western Journal of Communication

Centralizing Marginality, Marginalizing the Center in the WSCA 2018 Presidential Address


Published: Sep 01, 2018 by Western Journal of Communication
Authors: Michelle A. Holling
Subjects: Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies

Guided by the 2017 WSCA conference theme of “Centralizing Marginality, Marginalizing the Center,” and sociopolitical imperatives confronting the nation and the Association, I argue for (continued) institutional transformation. Pursued are the gains following from centralizing marginality and marginalizing the center that solicits adoption of centralizing marginality and marginalizing the center as a way of seeing—a way of approaching—what we do and how we do it.

Women's Studies in Communication

So My Name is Alma. I Am the Sister of . . .”: A Feminicide Testimonio of Violence and Violent Identifications


Published: Oct 01, 2014 by Women's Studies in Communication
Authors: Michelle A. Holling
Subjects: Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies

This essay articulates the contours of a feminicidio testimonio that stages violence in order for listeners to identify with (and against) acts of violence. Necessitated is transforming listeners-to-witnesses, an embodied positionality rhetorically crafted prior to and during a feminicidio testimonio. Along with the form and content of a feminicidio testimonio, contextual antecedents prime listeners by representing violence and kinship and functioning as scenes for addressing listeners.

Journal of International and Intercultural Communication

Racist Violations and Racializing Apologia in a Post-Racism Era


Published: Oct 01, 2014 by Journal of International and Intercultural Communication
Authors: Michelle A. Holling, Dreama G. Moon, & Alexandra Jackson Nevis
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Communications Studies

In theorizing the dialectic of public acts of white racial offenses and the in/sufficiency of apologia associated with white racial discourse, we examine racist violations and racializing apologia from 24 white public figures in the U.S. from 1995-2012. Analysis of racist violations reveals that each offense undermines race as a social and political marker, whereas racializing apologia makes explicit the constant force of racialization and latent nature of whiteness in apologia strategies.