Kristín  Loftsdóttir Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Kristín Loftsdóttir

Professor
University of Iceland

Kristín Loftsdóttir is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Iceland. Her research has focused on whiteness, gender, racial identity, migration, nationalism, Nordic exceptionalism and crisis, basing on work in Iceland, Niger and Belgium. She has published three monographs, edited six books and published in journals such as Ethnos, European Journal for Women’s Studies, Social Anthropology, and Identities and Social Identities.

Biography

Kristín Loftsdóttir‘s research focuses on  mobility, whiteness, gender, racial identity, postcolonialism, and crisis, specializing in Iceland and Europe. She has also conducted research on migrant work of indigenous community in Niger in West Africa and irregular migrants in Belgium and Northern Italy.

Loftsdóttir received recognition and award from the University of Iceland for outstanding research contribution in 2014. She is co-organizer of the project Mobilities and Transnational Iceland, that received grant of Excellence by RANNÍS – Icelandic Centre for Research in 2016 but is initiating a new project on the transnational connection between Iceland and the Canary Islands. Loftsdóttir has actively participated in various international collaborations and projects.  Earlier research includes, for example, the project Icelandic Identity in Crisis, funded by RANNÍS (leader), 2013 – 2015 and the HERA funded project Artic Encounters, 2013-2015 (team member).

Kristín Loftsdóttir’s most recent publication is the monograph Crisis and Coloniality at Europe’s Margins: Creating Exotic Iceland (Routledge, 2019). Her co-edited books include Messy Europe: Crisis, Race and Nation State in a Postcolonial World (Berghahn, 2018), Crisis in the Nordic Nations and Beyond (Routledge, 2014), Whiteness and Postcolonialism in the Nordic Region (Routledge, 2012). Her research has also published in journals such as Ethnos, European Journal for Women’s Studies, Social Anthropology, and Identities and Social Identities. Loftsdóttir has written about research methodology and her book (in Icelandic) The Woman who got spear on her head: The strangeness of methodology received Fjöruverðlaunin – Women’s Literature Award as scholarly book of the year in 2010. Loftsdóttir received recognition and award from the University of Iceland for outstanding research contribution in 2014.

Kristín Loftsdóttir has organized two museum exhibitions. The more recent one “Iceland in the World and the World in Iceland” focuses on racism and transnationalism in Iceland. It was set up in the National Museum of Iceland in fall 2016 – fall 2017. Additionally, Kristín has published two novels.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Nordic exceptionalism, postcolonialism, whiteness, gender, racial identity, mobility, crisis, migration, international development, tourism and nation branding.

Personal Interests

    Kristín Loftsdóttir’s hobbies are drawing, and reading.

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Crisis and Coloniality at Europe's Margins - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

 Social Identities

Within a ‘white’ affective space: racialization in Iceland and development discourses


Published: Apr 12, 2019 by Social Identities
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

By looking at international development in Iceland, the paper emphasizes that racialization takes place in different spheres of society where Icelandic racial subjectivities are shaped by global ideas of humanitarianism and international development that intersect with older Icelandic anxieties of belonging with sovereign northern European nations.

Social Identities

‘Europe is finished’: migrants lives in Europe’s capital at times of crisis


Published: Apr 12, 2019 by Social Identities
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

This article focuses on the idea of ‘Europe’ as seen from the point of view of Nigerien men who are living in Brussels without residency permits. Their narratives point to how current debates on migration and crisis tend to rely on an image of a disconnected world, which obfuscate Europe’s historical interconnections with those now seeking entrance into Europe.

Nora-Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research

The Exotic North: Gender, Nation Branding and Post-colonialism in Iceland


Published: Apr 12, 2019 by Nora-Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

This discussion stresses that looking at countries on the margins of European colonial rule can be useful when considering the wider dynamics of the present, reflecting the persistence of colonial discourses and how racism “endures”. The paper demonstrates how Iceland’s long association with the exotic and its gendered manifestations is currently being perpetuated by the tourist and state industries, under the influence of neo-liberal ideas about nation branding.

Focaal

Finding a place in the world Political subjectivities and the imagination of Iceland after the economic crash


Published: Apr 12, 2018 by Focaal
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir
Subjects: Anthropology - Soc Sci

The economic crash in Iceland created a sense of social and political collapse that extended far beyond the economic realm. In this article, I explore how ideas circulating in the wider European region about how Icelanders dealt exceptionally well with the crisis not only failed to reflect the lived effects of the collapse but also echoed long-standing nationalist ideals of Icelanders’ imagined reality of themselves.

Nordic Journal of Migration Research

Being “The Damned Foreigner”: Affective National Sentiments and Racialization of Lithuanians in Iceland


Published: Apr 12, 2017 by Nordic Journal of Migration Research
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

The article focuses on migrant workers from Lithuania in Iceland, and how they were racialized in the early 2000.

Ethnos

Building on Iceland's 'Good Reputation': Icesave, Crisis and Affective National Identities


Published: Apr 12, 2016 by Ethnos
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

My paper uses Icelandic discussions of the bankrupt bank to explore how individuals negotiate their imagination of the global and the national and how national identity can be reaffirmed in the context of crisis. The paper, furthermore, emphasises how crisis itself can be seen as constituting a field within which to exercise power, as well as a prism to investigate and understand national identities in a globalised world.

Interventions-International Journal of Postcolonial Studies

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE GLOBALLY CONCERNED EUROPEAN SUBJECT


Published: Apr 12, 2016 by Interventions-International Journal of Postcolonial Studies
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

This essay discusses international development in relation to spatial organization of the world, asking how development creates certain spaces of imagination where actions become meaningful while the wider context is made invisible, as well as allowing uncomfortable political issues – such as those concerning asylum seekers and the power of multinational corporations in creating poverty – within and outside the borders of the nation-state to become irrelevant.

Identitites

Global citizens, exotic others, and unwanted migrants: mobilities in and of Europe. Identities,


Published: Mar 14, 2016 by Identitites
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir
Subjects: Anthropology - Soc Sci

This article reflects on Europe’s problematic relationship with its ‘others’, asking in particular how the idea of the ‘exotic’ – constituting one of Europe’s ‘imperial ruins’ – intersects with the figure of the Muslim migrant. The Muslim migrant has in the present become in Europe a potent marker of otherness, which reflects how some cosmopolitan aspirations are perceived negatively in European discourses, revealing how mobility itself is racilized and gendered.

National Identities

‘The Danes don't get this’: the economic crash and Icelandic postcolonial engagements


Published: Apr 12, 2015 by National Identities
Authors: Kristín Loftsdóttir

This paper focuses on how Iceland's past as a Danish dependency was revisited in the economic boom period. The Danes were widely seen as the former colonial rulers who were ‘jealous’ of Icelanders’ success, in turn, giving the Icelandic national identity a stronger coherence.