Paul J.  Palma Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Paul J. Palma

Adjunct Professor
Regent University

Dr. Paul J. Palma is a professor for the College of Arts and Sciences and School of Divinity at Regent University. His research centers on global Pentecostal-charismatic movements. His book, Italian American Pentecostalism and the Struggle for Religious Identity, was recently published with the Routledge Studies in Religion series.

Subjects: History, Religion

Biography

Paul J. Palma has been teaching theology and Christian history at Regent University for about ten years. In addition to publications for numerous scholarly venues, Paul is a contributing writer for CBN.com and the Pneuma Review. He has delivered conference papers for the American Academy of Religion, Society of Biblical Literature, American Catholic Historical Association, and the Society for Pentecostal Studies.

Paul earned his Ph.D. in historical theology from Regent University in 2017. Prior to doctoral studies, he completed graduate studies at Wheaton College (IL), Syracuse University, and Trinity School for Ministry (PA).

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Global Pentecostal-charismatic movements
    Italian Pentecostalism
    Theology of religions and interfaith dialogue
    The Quest for the Historical Jesus
    Luke-Acts

Personal Interests

    I enjoy spending quality time with my family, whether on walks together, going to the beach, fishing, or work around the yard.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Italian American Pentecostalism and the Struggle for Religious Identity: Palma - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

PENTECOSTUDIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL FOR RESEARCH ON THE PENTECOSTAL AND CHARISMATIC MOVEMENTS

New Faith, New Family: Contadini, Pentecostalism, and the Struggle for Social Identity in the New World


Published: Oct 26, 2018 by PENTECOSTUDIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL FOR RESEARCH ON THE PENTECOSTAL AND CHARISMATIC MOVEMENTS
Authors: Paul J. Palma
Subjects: History, Religion, Social Psychology

During the mass migration of 1870-1920, the peasantry of southern Italy flooded the urban centres of America. Accustomed to a rural-agrarian lifestyle and steeped in traditional religious beliefs, contadini (Italian peasants) found themselves isolated in the industrial centers of America. Separation from kin and the faith of their ancestors contributed to a psychological void that led contadini to seek new forms of Christianity for religious fulfillment.

Journal of the European Pentecostal Theological Association

Between abstention and moderation: The example of the Jerusalem Council and the Italian Pentecostal holiness ethic


Published: Aug 09, 2018 by Journal of the European Pentecostal Theological Association
Authors: Paul J. Palma
Subjects: History, Religion, Social Psychology

Italian Pentecostalism was forged in the early twentieth century among displaced migrants in the urban centers of America. Fleeing the oppressive conditions introduced by the new Kingdom of Italy, Italians sought refuge and new beginning in America. Pentecostalism afforded Italian immigrants a way to endure marginalization and poor living standards in the urban enclaves, achieved by means of a strong communal identity expressed through a unique holiness ethic.