Páraic  Kerrigan Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Páraic Kerrigan

Lecturer
University College Dublin

Páraic Kerrigan is a Teaching Fellow in the School of Information and Communication Studies at University College Dublin. Prior to this, he was an Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Scholar and John and Pat Hume Scholar in the Department of Media Studies at Maynooth University, where he completed his doctorate in 2018. He has published widely across the fields of Media and Communication and Social Science.

Biography

Páraic Kerrigan is a Teaching Fellow in the School of Information and Communication Studies at University College Dublin. Prior to this, he was an Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Scholar and John and Pat Hume Scholar in the Department of Media Studies at Maynooth University, where he completed his doctorate in 2018. He has published widely across the fields of Media and Communication and Social Science.

His research interests cover three areas:

1. Media Industries and Production Cultures, particularly as they relate to issues of diversity and inclusion.
2. Queer Media and Communications, especially the intersection of queer identities and media technologies, with an emphasis on how the affordances of traditional and social media govern and discipline the visibility and representation of sexualities.
3. Information Science and Identity Management, with a focus on the modernisation of personal identity documents.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Communications
    -Digital Media
    -Media Industries
    -Media Work
    -Information Science
    -Production Cultures
    -LGBTQ Studies

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - LGBTQ Visibility, Media and Sexuality in Ireland - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Television & New Media

After Marriage: The Assimilation, Representation, and Diversification of LGBTQ Lives on Irish Television


Published: Nov 30, 2020 by Television & New Media
Authors: Páraic Kerrigan
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Media Communication

Since Ireland’s 2015 Marriage Equality referendum, emerging trends, variances and understandings of LGBTQ identities have begun to emerge on Irish television. At the crux of this post-marriage equality queer visibility lies a friction between the assimilation of queerness to an acceptable homonormative alternative to monogamous heteronormativity versus broader representations of indeterminate variety and fluidity.

 Media, Culture & Society

Camping it up and toning it down: gay and lesbian sexual identity in media work


Published: Mar 18, 2020 by Media, Culture & Society
Authors: Páraic Kerrigan and Anne O'Brien
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality, Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies, Media Communication

By its make-up, Irish screen production is heteronormative. This can be seen in terms of output, representation and production. Accordingly, this article argues that heteronormativity is a structuring dynamic in the identities of gay and lesbian media workers. Its impacts are two-fold and somewhat contradictory.

European Journal of Communication

Gay the right way? Roles and routines of Irish media production among gay and lesbian workers


Published: Feb 18, 2020 by European Journal of Communication
Authors: Anne O'Brien and Páraic Kerrigan
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality, Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies, Media Communication

This article explores how gay and lesbian identities are incorporated, or not, into the roles and routines of Irish film and television production.

 Journal of Librarianship and Information Science

An intersectional quantitative content analysis of the LGBTQ+ catalogue in Irish public libraries


Published: Jan 26, 2020 by Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
Authors: Pete Hicks and Páraic Kerrigan
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality, Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Information Science, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies, Media Communication

LGBTQ+ library materials are overwhelmingly representative of the gay, white, adult male experience, to the detriment of other groups within the LGBTQ+ community. Conducting a quantitative content analysis of the Dublin City Council Public Library catalogue through the lens of intersectionality theory confirms that the Irish public library system is not an exception to this trend.

Studies in Documentary Film

Projecting a queer republic: mainstreaming queer identities on Irish documentary film


Published: Oct 17, 2018 by Studies in Documentary Film
Authors: Páraic Kerrigan
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Media Communication, Art & Visual Culture

The focus of this article is on two documentaries produced by Ireland’s public service broadcaster RTÉ: Tuesday Report (1977) and Access Community Television (1984). It argues that mainstreaming approaches were a central representational strategy in these two documentaries that represented Irish gays and lesbians.

Journal of Radio & Audio Media

“Openness through Sound”: Dualcasting on Irish LGBT Radio


Published: Sep 20, 2018 by Journal of Radio & Audio Media
Authors: Páraic Kerrigan and Anne O'Brien
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality, Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Gender & Intersectionality Studies, Media Communication

This article explores how Ireland’s first LGBT radio station, Open FM, attempted to offer LGBT radio in a heteronormative media landscape.

Media History

OUT-ing AIDS The Irish Civil Gay Rights Movement’s response to the AIDS crisis (1984–1988)


Published: Aug 23, 2017 by Media History
Authors: Páraic Kerrigan
Subjects: History, Gender & Sexuality, Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Communication Studies, Media Communication

This article aims to fill this gap by presenting the findings of a study dealing with the AIDS epidemic in Ireland and how it was confronted through the alternative media platform of OUT magazine. Using issues of OUT, it argues that alternative media in Ireland were pivotal in generating vital public health information for the gay community, particularly when the mainstream press and Irish government were not providing the necessary resources.