Carla L. Peck Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Carla L. Peck

Professor
University of Alberta

Dr. Carla Peck is Professor of Social Studies Education in the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta and is Director of "Thinking Historically for Canada’s Future", a pan-Canadian research partnership. She researches teachers’ and students’ understandings of democratic concepts, teachers’ and students’ historical understandings, and is particularly interested in the relationship between students’ ethnic identities and their understandings of history.

Subjects: Education, History

Biography

Carla Peck is Professor of Social Studies Education in the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta and is Director of "Thinking Historically for Canada’s Future" SSHRC Partnership Grant. She researches teachers’ and students’ understandings of democratic concepts, teachers’ and students’ historical understandings, and is particularly interested in the relationship between students’ ethnic identities and their understandings of history. She has held several major research grants, has authored and co-authored numerous journal articles and book chapters, and has co-edited several books related to her research interests, including Teaching and Learning Difficult Histories in International Contexts: A Critical Sociocultural Approach, The Palgrave Handbook of Global Citizenship and Education, and Contemplating Historical Consciousness: Notes from the Field. Carla regularly works with teachers at the provincial, national, and international level and serves as a consultant on numerous boards and advisory groups for history and civic organizations. Strongly committed to social justice education, Dr. Peck has always sought ways to engage students of all ages in discussions about how to make the world a more equitable and just place to live. She views a solid grounding in history and historical inquiry as foundational to these discussions. Before Dr. Peck found her way to academia, she was an elementary school teacher in New Brunswick.

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Teaching and learning difficult histories - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Theory & Research in Social Education

On taking a more encompassing view: A response to den Heyer


Published: Mar 14, 2019 by Theory & Research in Social Education
Authors: Andrea Milligan, Lindsay Gibson, Carla L. Peck

This article responds to: den Heyer, K. (2019). On ethical judgments in history education: A response to Milligan, Gibson, and Peck published in the same issue.

Theory & Research in Social Education

Enriching ethical judgements in history education


Published: Nov 07, 2018 by Theory & Research in Social Education
Authors: Andrea Milligan, Lindsay Gibson, Carla L. Peck

This article explores the relationship between the philosophy of ethics, history education, and young people’s historical ethical judgments.

Education as Change

“But we didn’t live in those times”: Canadian students negotiate past and present in a time of war


Published: Sep 20, 2011 by Education as Change
Authors: Peter Seixas, Carla L. Peck, Stuart Poyntz

This article examines the ways in which students reason about past and present in relation to questions of ethnic identities and loyalty to the state in a time of war.

Theory & Research in Social Education

“It’s not like [I’m] Chinese and Canadian. I am in between”: Ethnicity and students’ conceptions of historical significance


Published: Jan 01, 2010 by Theory & Research in Social Education
Authors: Carla L. Peck

This article explores the relationship between students' ethnic identities and their ascriptions of historical significance to moments in Canada's past.

Curriculum Inquiry

Unreached and unreasonable: Curriculum standards and children's understanding of ethnic diversity in Canada


Published: Jan 01, 2008 by Curriculum Inquiry
Authors: Carla L. Peck, Alan Sears, A., Shanell Donaldson

This article traces the development of contemporary curriculum standards with regard to diversity and examines those standards in the context of a study of grade 7 students’ understanding of diversity in New Brunswick.